BA (Hons) Business Management with People Management

Choose this Business Management degree with outstanding business links and valuable work placements.

Course detail

Start Date

September

Duration

4 years

Award Title

BA (Hons)

UCAS Code

N260

Business Management with People Management

Overview

What are the business challenges presented by shifting markets, ever-changing business models and emerging technologies? Which management skills do you need to deliver a high-level financially and sustainable organisational performance? 

People are the lifeblood of any organisation, which is why it’s vital for businesses to make sure employees are happy, healthy and able to work to the best of their abilities. In order to prosper in an aggressive global economy, companies must effectively guide, nurture and manage their workforce.

Gain a clear understanding of how complex organisations work by choosing this fascinating degree designed to give your career a head start. Learn to thrive in today’s fast-paced global economy. 

You will learn from tutors with an extensive professional or academic background in People Management, as well as guest speakers from industry. By going beyond the classroom and undertaking activities such as the international IBM Business Challenge, you’ll gain a greater understanding of the complexities of business management.

Why study this course here

  • UK University of the Year 2021 - Teaching Quality (The Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide)
  • UK Top 10 - Student Satisfaction & Teaching (Guardian Good University Guide 2021)
  • UK Top 10 Student Satisfaction (National Student Survey 2020)

From recruitment and talent management to developing strategies, you will develop a specialist knowledge of HR. When you graduate you will be ready to improve organisational productivity, performance and profits by managing people effectively.

So whether your ambition is to start your own business or work within an organisation, your skills will be relevant all over the world.

Online Open Days 2021

An Online Open Day is a great way to help you decide what and where you want to study.

Join us virtually on Wed 29 Sep or Sat 30 Oct to chat to lecturers and students, see the facilities for the course(s) you're interested in, and get a flavour of our city-centre campus.

BOOK YOUR PLACE

An Abertay Student on a yellow coloured background

Compete in real world business challenges

Students are asked to come up with solutions to real business problems set by organisations from a range of business sectors, including food and drink, banking, textiles, and telecoms.

Working in small teams, students have to apply their studies to practical problems currently being faced by those businesses, before pitching their solution back to the company. 

Take part in entrepreneurial initiatives

In addition to developing solutions to live business problems, in many of your modules you'll be encouraged to take part in entrepreneurial initiatives to gain additional experience of group working and industry exposure. This is also a great opportunity to work with students from other programmes of study.

Classroom environment - lecturer standing - students sitting listening

Identify a social/economic challenge

Entrepreneurial Brains Made on Campus (EBMC)

In association with Stuttgart Media University in Germany, students are tasked with identifying a social or economic challenge and finding a solution which they then present back to former students and industry professionals. The top teams are invited to Germany to participate in the final.

Compete in a social enterprise challenge

Sponsored by IBM, this UK-wide initiative sees our students competing against other UK universities in hope of winning recognition for the best solution to a social enterprise challenge through simulation activities. We've had five teams in the final over the past nine years!

Male standing talking in front of a projector screen

About Your Modules

The module information featured is intended as an example only, describing the modules our students are taking this year. Modules are reviewed annually and may be subject to change. If you receive an offer to study with us we will send you a Programme document  that sets out exactly which modules you can expect to take as part of your Abertay University degree programme. Please see Terms and Conditions for more information.

Modules

Year 1 Core Modules

You must study and pass all four core modules

Brief description

Introduction to the disciplines of financial and management accounting.

Indicative content:

  • Introduction to financial accounting & management accounting: Accounting theory and practice; Different branches of accounting; Differences between financial and management accounting.
  • Different types of business organisation: The key concepts in financial accounting and the regulatory framework of financial accounting.
  • Basic financial accounting practice: Production of income statement and balance sheet for a sole trader including basic adjustments; Financial ratios.
  • Cost behaviour and measuring operational performance: Classification of costs and revenues and understanding implications of cost behaviour; Using marginal costing to support short-term decision-making; Measuring relevant costs and revenues for decision-making; Limiting factors, close-down, make or buy and other short-term decision; CVP analysis for a single product.
  • Information for planning, control and decision-making: The budgeting process; Preparation of cash budgets; Behavioural aspects of budgeting; Sources of management information.
  • Study techniques: Revising for exams.

Brief description

Introduction to the human resource management function within organisations

Indicative content

  • Personnel management to human resource management - a historical perspective: The origins of personnel management, emergence of HRM, hard and soft HRM.
  • The role of line managers and HRM practitioners: The range and scope of HR activities, distinction between operational and strategic HR activities, the role of the line manager in HR activities.
  • Employee resourcing: Human resource planning; pre recruitment activities, recruitment, selection, employer branding.
  • Employee development: Talent planning; training and development methods, designing learning and development, induction.
  • Employee relations: Control, power and authority in the employment relationship, HRM and employee relations, employee voice, employee participation.
  • Employee reward: Forms of reward, management of reward, reward systems, base pay. incremental pay schemes, contingency pay.
  • Performance management: measuring performance, performance appraisal, dealing with poor performance.

Brief description

Introduction to the management of people and ideas and how different theories and practices can be used to enhance individual and organisational performance.

Indicative content:

  • Management in context: Organisations as social and economic entities; The influence of social and economic factors on individual and organisational performance; The impact of material and time scarcity on performance.
  • People management: Selection; Motivation; Employees development; Teamwork; Stress; Workplace diversity and equal opportunity; Unconscious bias; Ethical leadership.
  • Ideas management: Creating climate for creativity and innovation; Knowledge sharing networks; Knowledge management.
  • Using research in management practice: Employee opinion survey; Research design; Use of research findings in managerial decision making.

Brief description

Analysis of microeconomic structures and market failures and an introduction to macroeconomic indicators and macroeconomic theory.

Indicative content

  • Demand-supply analysis: Product pricing decisions; Elasticity of demand; Demand forecasting; Cost estimation and forecasting; Input markets ; Labour markets and wages; Commodity markets and prices.
  • Market structure and potential failure: Perfect competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Deadweight loss and policies to limit excessive market power.
  • The macroeconomic environment: Macroeconomic conditions and indicators; Macroeconomic Theory and policy; Policy impact assessment; Exchange rate and business.
  • Strategic business decisions: Globalisation: Market entry and exporting decisions; Political risks; Theories of FDI; Outsourcing decisions. Vertical Integration. Diversification decisions. Application to business plans.

Years 1 Option Modules

You must study and pass one option module from Term 1 and two  option modules from Term 2.  

Brief description

The fundamentals of contemporary marketing theory and practice.

Indicative content:

  • Making sense of marketing: The nature of marketing within the contemporary environment.The digital transformation of the marketing function.
  • The marketing environment: Methods of evaluating the marketing environment including the use of digital tools and market research. The importance of customers, competitors and other stakeholders in the marketing environment to business performance. 
  • The marketing mix: The evolution of the marketing mix and the informed alignment of the elements of the mix to support organisational goals and objectives. 
  • Managing the marketing practice: The influences and issues involved in making marketing decisions e.g. globalisation, sustainability and understanding the customer.

Brief description

Introduction to the key theories, concepts and functions of management.

Indicative content:

  • Organisational structure and work design: Organisational structure, division of labour, job design.
  • Management theories: Evolution of management theories including, classical, motivational, systems, quality movement, knowledge management.
  • Leadership theories: Foundation of leadership including trait, behavioural and situational theories.
  • Management in practice: Managers’ roles and competencies, management functions – planning, leading, organising, controlling.

Brief description

Introduction to the nature and sources of law in Scotland.

Indicative content:

  • The origin and nature of law: Theories on the origin and nature of law. Law and other systems of rules. Distinguishing the Civil and Common Law systems. The emergence of Scots Law.
  • Fundamental legal concepts: The nature of obligations, legal rights and legal duties. The nature and concepts of Constitutions, separation of powers and the rule of law. Jurisdiction.
  • Sources of law: Institutional writers, legal treatises and authoritative writings. Custom. Roman Law. Legislation. Case law. Investigating and comparing paper and electronic sources.
  • The system for making and amending law: The legislative process in Scotland, the UK and the EU.
  • The system for interpreting and applying the law: The role of lawyers and the nature of legal services. The role of Judges and Courts. The Civil and Criminal Court system of Scotland. The Court system in the UK and EU. Hierarchy and precedent. Role of Tribunals.
  • Legislative interpretation: The approaches to interpreting legislation in the UK, Scotland and the EU. Rules of interpretation.
  • Case law interpretation: How and why cases are reported. Locating sources. The doctrine of Precedent. Ratio decidendi and obiter dicta. Distinguishing cases. Comparing Scottish, English and EU cases.
  • Construction and communication of legal argument: The nature of legal researching. How to research a legal issue. Developing a legal opinion or argument. Presentation technique. The conventions of legal writing. Citation, abbreviations, terminology.
  • Introduction to library-based information services and research skills: Layout of the library; library resources; Virtual library and catalogue; Virtual library information service; recording and citing sources; using IT applications.
  • Choosing and using specialist sources of information: Specialist sources of information for professional practice (Westlaw, LexisNexis, Pebble+); abstracting and indexing services; press reports; information services outwith the library (electronic journals, internet). Referencing; the conventions of legal writing, citation, abbreviations, terminology.

    Brief description

    Develop a range of skills, knowledge and techniques within the natural, technological and social sciences that are relevant to the study of environmental sustainability and concurrently, life in the twenty-first century. 

    Indicative content

    • The Challenge of Sustainable Development: Problems associated with life in the 21st Century and the relationship to scientific provisionalism and uncertainty are discussed.
    • The Genesis of Sustainable Development Concept: Developments associated with the Club of Rome are outlined while Limits to Growth and the Tragedy of the Commons are discussed.
    • Evolution of Sustainable Development: The Reo Summit and Suitability, and Policy Developments thereof will be discussed.
    • Mainstreaming Sustainability: Sustainability and Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience, as individual and social concerns, will be evaluated. And their role in transformation will be discussed.
    • Communicating Sustainability: Human well-being, Environmental Justice, Environmental Policy and the practicalities of Sustainability in Scotland are discussed.
    • Sustainable Development in Practice: Community Empowerment associated with Land Reform. Energy Production and Food Production in Tayside..
    • Ethics and Sustainability Policy: Active citizenship and Globalisation.
    • Innovating Locally, Transforming Globally: Transformations that are required to embrace Sustainability.
    • Active Relationship for Sustainable Futures: Thinking Globally, acting locally.

    Brief description

    Social, managerial, economic, political and technical challenges and opportunities associated with emerging renewable energy innovation, production, supply and consumption.

    Indicative content

    • Renewable Energy Nontechnical Challenges and Opportunities: Social and political challenges and opportunities of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Economic and environmental challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Strategic and managerial challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption.
    • Renewable Energy Technological Challenges and Opportunities:. Geotechnical and Geophysical information. Technical limitations and challenges of energy distribution systems and energy storage. Current technological development trend, collaborative innovation in renewable energy.

    Brief description

    Introduction to tax.

    Indicative content

    • Introduction to taxation: General introduction to UK tax system; Administration of tax system; Tax evasion; Tax avoidance; HMRC Charter; Introduction to Income tax.
    • Sources of income: Basis of assessment and allowable expenditure; Capital expenditure; Personal allowances and reliefs; Income and losses arising from property; Employee’s liability for National Insurance contributions.
    • Income from employment: Basis of assessment; Employment income; Non-taxable employment income; Deductible expenses; Administration of the Pay As you Earn (PAYE) system; Benefit-in-kind.
    • Income from self-employment: The calculation of trading profits; Disallowed and allowable expenditure; Trading income allowance ; Basis periods for trading income; Commencement of trade; Cessation of trade; Change of accounting date; Capital allowances; Trading losses and relief; partnerships.

    Brief description

    Skills and knowledge required to manage the finance of an event.

    Indicative content

    • Sources of funding: Determining where funding will come from for your event; funding policies; funding applications to external sponsors; convincing sponsors of the benefits of funding your event.
    • Budgeting and breakeven: Understanding the types of costs involved in the project;  Preparing a simple budget and analysing a complex (pre-prepared) budget; Creating a break-even analysis.
    • Controlling finances: Pre-event controls, operational controls, post control mechanisms..

    Brief description

    The importance of digital technology in the marketing function in today’s organisation. 

    Indicative content: 

    • Introduction to digital marketing: Discussing the impact of digital transformation on the marketing function. Creating digital strategies that are integrated within the wider marketing strategy and support the organisational goals and objectives.
    • Understanding the digital marketing environment: Examining the internal and external facets of the digital environment that the company operates within including competitors, the digital consumer and the wider digital landscape.
    • The planning process: Exploring the models and methods of planning your digital strategies based on audit data, social listening and company objectives. 
    • Media and tools planning : Selecting the appropriate tools and media to use to support the implementation of the digital marketing strategy.

    Year 2 Core Modules

    You must study and pass all four core modules

    Brief description

    Business Analytics is generally thought to comprise three broad categories: descriptive analytics, predictive analytics, and prescriptive analytics. You need no prior higher education experience in statistics.

    Indicative content

    • Descriptive statistics: Descriptive statistics to summarize data. Modifying data using Excel, measures of location, measures of variability, measures of association between two variables and data cleansing.
    • Data visualisation: The most common forms of visualising data and when each form is appropriate. The human mind can process visual images such as charts much faster than it can interpret rows of numbers.
    • Probability - modelling uncertainty: Basic relationships of probability, conditional probability, random variables and probability distributions.
    • Descriptive data mining: Cluster analysis, association rules and text mining.
    • Statistical inference: Sample selection, point estimation, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis tests.
    • Simple linear regression: The least squares method and the fit of the model.
    • Multiple linear regression: Extension of the simple linear regression model to incorporate multiple independent variables. Statistical inference in regressions, categorical independent variables, model fitting and prediction using regression models.
    • Time series analysis and forecasting: Time series patterns, forecast accuracy, moving averages and using regression analysis for forecasting.

    Brief description

    Human resource management theory and practice.

    Indicative content

    • Introduction to HRM: Theoretical perspectives to HRM; practical approaches to HRM.
    • Context and HRM: National, international, occupational, organisational and individual contexts of HRM in theory and in practice.
    • Strategic HRM: Introduction to strategic human resource management; ‘best fit’ and ‘best practice’ approaches.
    • HRM, work and wellbeing: Fair work; dignity at work; mental health and stress at work; the benefits and challenges of flexibility.
    • HRM, equality and diversity: Inequalities in the labour market and in the workplace; managing diverse workforce.
    • Managing conflict in the workplace: Conflict in the employment relationship; misbehaviour, discipline and grievance procedures; bullying and harassment; disputes.
    • Contemporary HRM trends and future challenges: Continuity and change in work and employment; gig economy; (ir)responsible HRM.

    Brief description

    The tools and techniques associated with managing projects. Carry out an investigation into a project failure and recommend alternative actions which could have been taken.

    Indicative content

    • Project management and project teams
      Intepreting project specifications and objectives, and the requirements of project stakeholders; Key project challenges for individuals and groups: reviewing the key priorities of time and project management; Understanding the role of a project leader; Understanding team work and how effective teams function; Creating and contributing to effective project teams; Managing teams through project delivery; maintaining goal focus, and managing problems
    • Project analysis and planning: Analysing project requirements and sub-tasks. Estimating timelines; deadlines and milestones and activity durations. Constructing a project schedule. Resourcing projects. Allocating and smoothing resources. Using Gantt charts to allocate and monitor resource allocation. Project management tools. Using project management software.
    • Managing projects: Dealing with project risk. Evaluating the probability and potential impact of risk; contingency planning for risk management; project tracking and revision to completion. Evaluating project delivery and management: Analysing the effectiveness of project management processes and the impact of project delivery and non-delivery.
    • Project management methodologies: The use of project management methodologies such as Prince2 and SCRUM.

    Brief description

    Introduction to research methods for real world research.

    Indicative content

    • Introduction to research: Explaining the nature and purpose of research; Classifying the different types of research (quantitative qualitative, mixed methods) and how they map within the different philosophical paradigms (positivism, interpretivism, pragmatism).
    • Dealing with practical Issues: Identifying the main stages in the research process; Identifying/generating a research topic and setting research objectives; Developing a research strategy; Identifying ethical issues in conducting research.
    • Searching and reviewing the literature: Explaining the purposes of a literature review and defining the main steps in conducting it; Searching, evaluating, organizing and synthesizing relevant literature.
    • Data collection and analysis: Approaches to qualitative and quantitative data collection; Data collection using a mixed-methods design.
    • Writing a research proposal: Purpose and structure of a research proposal.
    • Descriptive statistics: Summarisng and visualising data sets; Exploring the relationships between variables.
    • Inferential statistics: Hypothesis testing; Selected hypothesis tests.

    Year 2 Option Modules

    You must study and pass one option module of your choosing from Term 1 and two from Term 2.  

    Brief description

    The way in which people's lives are inter-twined with the `digital revolution from a sociological perspective.

    Indicative content

    • Everyday digital life: The sociological significance of the incorporation of digital technology within everyday practices. Examples of such practices include: shopping and consumption, education, and games and entertainment.
    • The digital self: The use and impact of digital technology on the ways in which online identities are fashioned, primarily through the use of social media.
    • Contemporary issues: Controversial and/or contemporary issues such as: the use/abuse of 'big data', bots and the Turing Test, higher education and the 'University of Google', trust and reputation online, data-mapped selves.

    People, Planet, Profit

    Brief description

    Develop a range of skills, knowledge and techniques within the natural, technological and social sciences that are relevant to the study of environmental sustainability and concurrently, life in the twenty-first century. 

    Indicative content

    • The Challenge of Sustainable Development: Problems associated with life in the 21st Century and the relationship to scientific provisionalism and uncertainty are discussed.
    • The Genesis of Sustainable Development Concept: Developments associated with the Club of Rome are outlined while Limits to Growth and the Tragedy of the Commons are discussed.
    • Evolution of Sustainable Development: The Reo Summit and Suitability, and Policy Developments thereof will be discussed.
    • Mainstreaming Sustainability: Sustainability and Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience, as individual and social concerns, will be evaluated. And their role in transformation will be discussed.
    • Communicating Sustainability: Human well-being, Environmental Justice, Environmental Policy and the practicalities of Sustainability in Scotland are discussed.
    • Sustainable Development in Practice: Community Empowerment associated with Land Reform. Energy Production and Food Production in Tayside..
    • Ethics and Sustainability Policy: Active citizenship and Globalisation.
    • Innovating Locally, Transforming Globally: Transformations that are required to embrace Sustainability.
    • Active Relationship for Sustainable Futures: Thinking Globally, acting locally.

    Brief description

    Social, managerial, economic, political and technical challenges and opportunities associated with emerging renewable energy innovation, production, supply and consumption.

    Indicative content

    • Renewable Energy Nontechnical Challenges and Opportunities: Social and political challenges and opportunities of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Economic and environmental challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Strategic and managerial challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption.
    • Renewable Energy Technological Challenges and Opportunities:. Geotechnical and Geophysical information. Technical limitations and challenges of energy distribution systems and energy storage. Current technological development trend, collaborative innovation in renewable energy.

    Brief description

    Introduction to tax.

    Indicative content

    • Introduction to taxation: General introduction to UK tax system; Administration of tax system; Tax evasion; Tax avoidance; HMRC Charter; Introduction to Income tax.
    • Sources of income: Basis of assessment and allowable expenditure; Capital expenditure; Personal allowances and reliefs; Income and losses arising from property; Employee’s liability for National Insurance contributions.
    • Income from employment: Basis of assessment; Employment income; Non-taxable employment income; Deductible expenses; Administration of the Pay As you Earn (PAYE) system; Benefit-in-kind.
    • Income from self-employment: The calculation of trading profits; Disallowed and allowable expenditure; Trading income allowance ; Basis periods for trading income; Commencement of trade; Cessation of trade; Change of accounting date; Capital allowances; Trading losses and relief; partnerships.

    Brief description

    Skills and knowledge required to manage the finance of an event.

    Indicative content

    • Sources of funding: Determining where funding will come from for your event; funding policies; funding applications to external sponsors; convincing sponsors of the benefits of funding your event.
    • Budgeting and breakeven: Understanding the types of costs involved in the project;  Preparing a simple budget and analysing a complex (pre-prepared) budget; Creating a break-even analysis.
    • Controlling finances: Pre-event controls, operational controls, post control mechanisms.

    Brief description

    The impact of festivals and events on their host communities.

    Indicative Content

    • Introduction: The theoretical background: Basic concepts, ideas, principles of festivals, events and communities; Forces-Stressors-State-Impact-Response (FPSIR) model)
    • Types of events: Local community events to mega and online events
    • Impact of events: Nature of impacts, impact assessments; Economic, social, environmental, tourism, political, psychological
    • Future of events: Introduction to the future, industry perception of events future; future trends and issues. Live streaming.
    • Stakeholders: Stakeholder theory Corporate Social Responsibility theory, 
    • Case studies in events.

    Brief description

    The importance of digital technology in the marketing function in today’s organisation. 

    Indicative content: 

    • Introduction to digital marketing: Discussing the impact of digital transformation on the marketing function. Creating digital strategies that are integrated within the wider marketing strategy and support the organisational goals and objectives.
    • Understanding the digital marketing environment: Examining the internal and external facets of the digital environment that the company operates within including competitors, the digital consumer and the wider digital landscape.
    • The planning process: Exploring the models and methods of planning your digital strategies based on audit data, social listening and company objectives. 
    • Media and tools planning: Selecting the appropriate tools and media to use to support the implementation of the digital marketing strategy.

    Year 3 Core Modules

    You must study and pass all three core modules.

    Brief description

    How companies can improve their competitiveness by using digital solutions.Exploiting technology to transform service delivery through Internet portals, intra-corporate connected environments, social networks. Transforming internal processes and ways of working with partners are strategic issues considered by most organisations, both large and small. 

    Indicative content

    • Meaning and scope of e-business and e-commerce: Introduction and overview: current trends and issues. The evolution of e-business.
    • Analysis of firm's external environment: The macro-environment and implications for e-business ventures. Defining industry, segments and target markets for e-business.
    • Analysis of firm's internal environment: The meaning of core competence in e-business; the four virtual spaces of the ICDT framework for interaction with customers; the meaning of the company's value chain and value network.
    • Foundations of value creation in e-business: Understanding of what the value is and elements that contribute to value creation; the value grid and levers of e-value creation.
    • Dealing with disruptive innovations in e-business: Successful imitation and the barriers to imitation; how companies can assess the threat of a disruptive innovation; the ways to deal with a disruptive innovation in e- business. The trade-off between richness and reach in e-business; customer relationship management in the digital context; the concept of mass-customisation.Business models and revenue models in digital business; Digital transformation: a blend of digital technology, people, innovation and creativity; Doing digital (i.e. tactical solutions) vs being digital (i.e. strategic solutions); Implementation by creating a competitive advantage; Protecting digital business from imitation.

    Brief description

    The effective mobilisation of a workforce and how organisations can only function if they are able to assemble together individuals and teams of people with the necessary skills, attitudes and experience to meet their objectives. 

    Indicative content

    • Introduction - The theoretical background: Employment Markets and Regulations. Resourcing Strategy. The Future of Work. Fairness and Diversity.
    • The context of employee resourcing: Introduction; people and work; Global employment markets and regulation. The Fu.ture of work. Fairness and Diversity 
    • Human resource/Talent planning: The meaning, purpose and importance of long and short term talent planning and succession planning; building long term organisational performance.
    • Job analysis - producing a job description: The meaning and importance of job analysis and role analysis; methods of conducting a job and role analysis and competency framework; job descriptions; person specifications.
    • Recruitment - attracting the right people: The recruitment process: defining requirements; attracting applicants; sending and receiving information; making contacts. Recruitment methods: Advertising; the use of the internet and social media; Application forms and CVs; Internal and external recruitment.
    • Selection - choosing the right people: The selection process; sifting applications; shortlisting candidates; interviewing and other methods; Making an offer.
    • Employee retention: Employer branding; Induction; Talent management strategies.
    • The management of retirement, redundancy and dismissal practices: Retirement. Dismissals. Redundancy.

    Brief description

    The challenges facing contemporary business organisations in an operating context in which they are expected not only to demonstrate an economic contribution and shareholder value, but increasingly, to do so in a manner that reflects the interests of a range of stakeholder groups and being sustainable.

    Indicative Content

    • The changing context of business: The changing nature of organisations: from industrial to post-industrial society; globalisation structures, processes and arguments; 
    • Sustainable business practice: Corporate social responsibility and The Business and Society Relationship; Corporate Citizenship: Social Responsibility, Responsiveness, and Business Performance 
    • Employee well being at work: Employees as stakeholders: issues relating to privacy, safety and employee well-being 
    • The role of third sector organisations; Social and economic exclusion and business; understanding the conditions of inequality and social exclusion; factors influencing social mobility, The social contribution of third sector organisations
    • Corporate social responsibility:  Public Policy and governance: public and third sector 

    Brief description

    Current thinking on the effects of globalisation and culture on management practice and how national cultures shape the processes of employee development and organisational performance.

    Indicative content

    • Introduction: The theoretical background: The meaning and importance of managing across− cultures, perceptions and models of culture and cultural differences in organisation theory and management studies. The context and dimensions of managing across cultures, convergence and divergence theories, and classification of the different approaches to managing in different countries.
    • Managing in the Anglo−Saxon countries: Analysing the Anglo-Saxon approach to management; Managing in the USA and the UK
    • Managing in Asian countries: Effects of Confucianism, Communism and economic dynamism on management and organisation in East Asia countries; Managing in China, Japan and South Korea.
    • Managing in Western European countries: Analysing the Francophone, the Germanic and other European models of management. The impact of the EU integration and expansion on employment and labour markets. Managing in France and Germany.
    • Managing in Less Developed countries: From colonialism to dependency: the impact of international trade, transfer of knowledge and technology, ideologies and religious beliefs on management (mismanagement) and organisation in less developed countries. Managing in selected African and Middle−Eastern countries.
    • Contemporary issues of cross−cultural management: Global ethics and global labour markets: Gender, race, disability and age concerns. International organizations' responses to changing demographics; International organisations' responses to skills shortages. International approaches to managing diversity; and the use of IT in International HRM.

    Year 3 Option Modules

    You must study and pass one option module of your choosing from Term 1 and two from Term 2.

    Brief description

    The individual contract of employment at common law, and under statute, and the regulation which applies to that contract.

    Indicative content

    • Formation of the Contract of Employment: Definition; form; jurisdiction and choice of law, continuous employment; fixed-term, retiring age.
    • Administration of Employment Law: The Tribunals system; the Department for Business Innovation and Skills and other agencies active in this field e.g. ACAS, Equality and Human Rights Commission.
    • Terms of the Contract: Minimum statutory requirements; express, implied, custom, collective agreements. Terms imposed by the common law and modified by statute. Employment protection provided by statute: e.g. suspension from work; family friendly working rights; pay; insolvency of employer; National Minimum Wage; working hours.
    • Discrimination in Employment: General; Equality Act 2010 and protected characteristics of gender reassignment, race, disability, age, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation, pregnancy and maternity, and marriage and civil partnership; equal pay
    • Discipline and Grievance: Works' rules and procedures; ACAS recommended practice.
    • Transfer of a Business: UK implementation of EU Directives; rights of transferred employees.
    • Termination of the Contract of Employment: Notice; dismissal: wrongful, unfair; redundancy; remedies.

    Brief description

    The role of relationship building and customer experience management to business performance. 

    Indicative content

    • Defining the nature of customer relationship management: The use of data and insights to drive the strategic, operational and analytical aspects of relationship management. Aligning customer relationships with organisational visions and objectives. 
    • Understanding customer relationships: Understanding the benefit of relationships to customers and to organisations. The use of technology to evaluate the customer lifecycle, develop customer loyalty and enhance the value of the customer relationship. 
    • Customer portfolio management: The process of using data and insight to support segmenting, targeting and profiling customers andw to analyse the value of the various segments and provide them with tailored, relevant acquisition or retention strategies. 
    • Customer experience management: Using various digital tools to support the delivery of customer-experienced value. Exploring how value of a customer experience is determined and by whom.  The difference between customer experience management and customer relationship management.

    Brief description

    The societal and political pressures organisations face to rapidly reach achieve zero carbon emissions. Develop the skills needed to evaluate an organisation's current environmental impact and create and implement a new strategy to reduce this impact. 

    Indicative content

    • Examine why environmental stewardship is important for any business to pursue, and why that importance will likely grow stronger in the future.
    • Methods for evaluating an organisations current environmental impact
    • Defining initiatives that fill gaps between the current state and the future vision and constructing a roadmap for achieving the vision.
    • To introduce and explain business process transformation methodologies, with supporting technology and tools, that focus on increasing operational efficiency and reducing waste. E.g. IBM’s Green Sigma methodology.
    • Frameworks for developing and implementing a green strategy, and illustrate the benefits many organisations have realised in each strategic area.

    Brief description

    The theory of policy development and its effects on organisations and vice versa. 

    Indicative content

    • What is public policy: The process by which governments translate their political vision and ideologies into programmes and actions to deliver outcomes and desired changes in the real world. 
    • The policy process: The foundations, importance and goals of public policy. The stages of the policy cycle and the political factors that influence them.
    • Theories of power and the policy process: Apply the theory such as, Rational Actor Theory and Institutional theory to real-world policy case studies. 
    • How organisations shape and impact on policy: How organisations and industry representatives such as lobbyists can inform, persuade, pressure and influence governments, policy makers and public policy to help serve their interests. 
    • Public policy and the operation of organisations: How public policies and government influence markets for sustainable businesses; Why public policy is important to sustainable business and business more generally; Key influencers and the impacts of relationship of public policy and why public policymaking does not always serve the public interest.

    Brief description

    Overview of successful events management; key considerations and stakeholder participation

    Indicative content

    • Event Management as an industry: The current economic position of the industry.  Recent events and how the industry is changing.  The impact of technology on the industry.  Types of events; The 5 ‘Cs of event management.
    • Digital presentation: Creating and facilitating a Microsoft Teams meeting; using online tools for presentation of information (e.g. Moovly, Prezzie, videos). 
    • Concept: Event Entrepreneurship Who, what, where, when and why.  Deciding on the theme/branding for the event; Understanding your audience and how you will ‘reach’ them through your branding and advertising.  Considering how the audience impacts on issues such as venue choice and how you will fulfil expectations.
    • Coordination: Creating a schedule of activities; Finding, booking and organising suppliers; front and back of house staff recruitment and training; understanding stakeholder groups and managing them accordingly.
    • Control: Conformance with legislation and regulatory frameworks e.g. supplier contracts, health & safety, employment How the budget should be managed; Making sure you have accounted for all costs;  Getting quotes; sponsorship; additional revenue opportunities.
    • Culmination:  Ensuring everything is ready for opening ; Managing people movement/control; Back-up planning.
    • Closeout: Reviewing what has happened and learning from mistakes.

    Brief description

    Spend a specified time in a business environment working in an area related to your programme.

    Indicative content

    • Placement preparation
    • Placement briefing: Responsibilities of all parties involved; expectations; professional conduct. of placement; requirements of professional conduct.
    • Experiential learning: Supervised Placement carried out 1 day per week for 10 weeks(preferred structure)or 10 day block; feedback; employer assessment, student reflection on performance while on placement.
    • Placement check: Discussions will take place between the placement tutor, student and employer to ensure satisfactory progress is being made.
    • Placement presentation: Prepare a Poster presentation focused on your placement learning and employability skills development, and on learning through experience to peers and employers.
    • Business investigation/Business project: Research within the placement organisation, a business/management issue, or participate in a workplace project and report on the findings/outcomes.

    Brief description

    The skills and knowledge needed to launch a small business successfully. Acquire the personal and professional skills needed in order to develop a professional career and/or to succeed as entrepreneurs in Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs).

    Indicative content

    • An introduction to entrepreneurship and an analysis of the skills and qualities associated with successful entrepreneurs.
    • Generating successful business ideas.
    • Environmental scanning.
    • Developing a credible business plan that includes evaluating business ideas. Assessing risk and uncertainty; identifying potential customers, markets and market segments; assessing operations, USP and competition; price vs quality and profits.
    • Presenting the business idea.

    Brief description

    How the complexities, dynamics and uncertainties of the contemporary business environment impacts on the organisation of work and the contemporary employment relationship. .

    Indicative content:

    • The future working context: The changing context of work, post bureaucratic society, Millennial, and high performance work contexts.
    • The new employment relationship and new forms of control: Flexible work and the precariat, The changing nature of capital - emotional and aesthetic labour; The psychological contract.
    • Conflict in the workplace: The changing nature of power and politics in organisational decision-making and management practice. The changing nature of contemporary employee relations; organisational misbehaviour and counter-productive work behaviours. 
    • Human capital development: The learning organisation and organisational learning, technology mediated work processes, talent sourcing and human capability and knowledge management; career planning and development, rewards and recognition.
    • Outcomes: Learning from high performance organisations; Engaging employees, employee engagement and discretionary effort; building organisational resilience.

    Year 4 Core Modules

    You must study and pass all five core modules

    Brief description

    Prepare for graduate recruitment by ensuring you have the professional skills required in the workplace.

    Indicative content

    • Analysing the job market: Determining the type of job you would like to move into. Thinking about sectors and finding out what employers want. 
    • Skills audit: Undertaking a skills audit. 
    • Preparing for work: Understanding the trends in your chosen field of employment and employers’ requirements for staff. 
    • Topic specific activity: Options for study of different skills and knowledge.

    Brief description

    The main concepts, approaches and tools of strategic management in the contemporary business environment. The fundamentals of operations management, such as the supply network, inventory management, and the use of technology in operations processes. 

    Indicative content

    • Operations management in its organisational context: The operations function within the organisation and its relationship with other functional areas; The role of the operations manager.
    • Performance Objectives, Operations Strategy and Operations Design: Measuring operations performance, operations strategy, different types of strategies, formulation of operations strategy, product and service innovation, Types of Innovation, stages of product and service innovation, 4Vs.
    •  Capacity Management: Demand v. production, models of capacity planning, measuring capacity (utilisation and efficiency calculations).
    • Inventory Management: Why hold stock? Costs of inventory, ABC analysis, economic order quantity, inventory management strategies.
    • Technology in Operations processes: E-supply chain, IT application in supply chain system, enterprise resource planning, technology strategies.
    • Supply Chain Management: The supply network; designing the supply chain (make or buy); supply chain stages; uncertainly and risk factors, purchasing and supply, materials and distribution management, logistics, balancing flow within a supply chain, managing bottlenecks and restrictions. Supply chain measures, six sigma, strategic alliances and collaborative partnerships, characteristics of supply chains in the contemporary global economy.
    • Outsourcing: Make or buy decisions in sourcing strategy; supplier selection; outsourcing supply chain management; co- ordinating supply and managing supplier relationships & partnerships, supply chain risks management.
    • The customer interface: Meeting customer requirements, forecasting demand, lean operations and JIT, lean principles, reducing waste.
    • Strategy and the organisation: Strategic analysis; strategic thinking; levels of strategy.
    • Strategy context: Industry analysis: turbulences and dynamics. Porter’s five forces.
    • Business level strategy: Business level strategy and sources of competitive advantage.
    • Corporate level strategy: Generic strategies; hybrid strategy; value chains.

    Brief description

    Overview of employee relations theory, practice and processes. It combines a theoretical approach to knowledge development in an applied and practitioner-oriented fashion. 

    Indicative content

    • The changing nature of employee relations: From industrial to employee relations; Employee relations theoretical explanations; Employee relations and the global economy; Employee Relations – parties their roles and functions,
    • Employee relations in context: Local, National and International dimensions of employee relations; Trade unions, employer organisations and their role in employee relations; Employee relations and the law.
    • The employment relationship: HRM and employee relations – learning from practice; Perspectives on power in employee relations; Partnership approaches to workplace relations; Organisational processes and the design and implementation of employment relations,
    • Employee engagement: History of engagement; Definitions; HR approaches to employee engagement; enablers; Communication within employee relations and employee engagement and the role of ‘voice’.
    • Employee relations and engagement: Learning from practice. HR practitioners (public-private), CiPD and TU.

    Brief description

    Undertake some practical research in response to a current business need of a real company and produce a suitable management report with recommendations.

    Indicative content

    • Analysing a problem: Using different analysis techniques such as data flow diagrams, entity relationship modelling and process mapping, examine problems to better understand the current position of the business.
    • Innovation and innovation techniques: Using different creativity and innovation tools to help find solutions to business problems.
    • Innovation for global growth (IGG): Work with multiple organisations - public, private and third sector, on a challenge they currently face. This will provide a scoping opportunity for the problem and a chance to test possible solutions. Prior to this event discussions on professional behaviour and communication will take place.
    • Developing and presenting the solution: Take the solutions identified during IGG and further investigate their suitability. Develop one or more solution to provide an implementation plan for the organisation.

    Brief description

    The strategic aspects of HRM and how the subject relates to other management functions in the delivery of organisational objectives. Aspects of HRM within the context of organisations' globalised operations.

    Indicative content:

    • Theoretical approaches to the study of HRM: Problems and controversies. An integrative and international perspective.
    • Business strategy and strategic decision making: Strategic implementation and HRM. The relationship between managing people and other key business functions.
    • Employee resourcing: Strategic aspects of resourcing an organisation; Human Resource Planning; Strategic approaches to recruitment and selection; Selection methods and techniques.
    • Strategies for human resource development: Performance appraisal and performance management; Models and approaches to employee development; The national and international context; Management development approaches and methods.
    • Strategic reward systems: Financial and non-financial elements; strategic approaches to reward management.
    • Employee relations: Strategic aspects of employee relations; trade unions and collective bargaining; employee voice; industrial action and the settlement of industrial disputes.

    Year 4 Option Modules

    You must study and pass one option module of your choosing. 

    Brief description

    Introduction to international trade. A practical guide to sell abroad profitably including the legal regimes applicable.

    Indicative content

    • Introduction to world trade: The economic rationale for international trade, barriers to trade and international markets. World Bank data, current trade developments.
    • Building the foundations for exporting: Are you ready for export? Writing an export Business Plan, prepping for exports.
    • Creating and using online marketing platforms: Online fundamentals, creating a social media and networking presence, marketing your business worldwide.
    • Mapping your export journey: Choosing a product to export, exploring your territory, preparing and adapting your product for the export marketplace.
    • Managing the transactions: Transport, logistics and fulfilment options; pricing and preparing quotations; getting paid.
    • Some policies of the institutions and organisations: For example the Generalised System of Preferences and the incorporation of Development issues into International Trade regulation.
    • The effect on business of the International Regulation: To include the Vienna Sales Convention 1980, with a UK focus, letters of credit, cross border guarantees, international carriage of goods, by land, sea and air.

    Brief description

    Contemporary accounting, business and management issues and to gain an in-depth understanding of current thinking. 

    Indicative content

    • Business and management: Contemporary issues in general management 
    • Human resource management: Contemporary issues in human resource management, organisation theory and structure
    • Marketing: Contemporary issues in marketing  
    • Accounting and finance: Contemporary issues in accounting and finance

    Brief description

    The challenges of managing in complex international business environments.

    Indicative content:

    • Introduction - The theoretical background: Globalisation and international business; Analysis of international external business environment; political factors; economical factors; social factors; technological factors and implications for international managers; International trade theories and practices.
    • International business strategies: Strategy and international business; Country evaluation and selection; Export and Import strategies; Direct investments and collaborative strategies.
    • International and cross-cultural management: International Dimensions of Culture: Understanding various dimensions of culture; Hofstede's (1980) National Culture Approach and Trompenaars (1993) Cultural Dimensions. Implications for International Managers. managing employee relations in multiple contexts. 
    • Managing in international contexts: Culture and negotiations: Understanding the relationship between culture and negotiations; how to reconcile possible conflicts regarding differences in culture and negotiations. 
    • Contemporary issues in managing international business: Managing international work assignments, Understanding the implications of CSR on MNE decision making.

    How the Course Works

    It’s flexible

    Tailor what you study to suit your own interests and career aspirations. This degree is part of a larger portfolio of 12 courses covering business, accounting and marketing.  

    The first two years covers a common curriculum including the basics of business, accounting, and marketing meaning there’s the flexibility to swap between all of or some of the courses depending when you join.

    The course options within the Business Management

    stream are:

    Joining us in Year 1: You can choose to specialise within business management, add one of the  extra subjects above to it, or even move to a marketing or accounting course in year 2. In year 3 you can still move within any of the courses in the Business Management stream.

    Joining us in Year 2 or 3: You can transfer within the Business Management stream at the start of both years, except for Business Management with Law.

    Shape your own learning journey

    Our academics will provide advice and full support about transferring, and help you choose your modules as you progress through the years. 

    Your chosen specialism will be reflected in your degree title e.g. BA (Hons) Business Management with Analytics - or if you choose not to specialise, you will graduate in BA (Hons) Business Management.

    Transfering between the courses is straightforward, so only apply for one of them.

    Learning and Assessment

    You’ll be assessed via a combination of methods:

    • Portfolio projects
    • Presentations
    • Examinations
    • Group work
    • Simulations
    • Work assessments.

    We also have international partner institutions, from the US to Asia, and all stops in between, where you can study in English for a term or a year. This is an excellent opportunity to boost your CV, as it shows your willingness to experience different cultures and methods of working.

    Entry Requirements

    Please note: All applicants must have passes in English and Maths or Lifeskill Maths - National 5 grade C or GCSE grade C/4 or equivalent.  National 5 ESOL is accepted in lieu of National 5 English.

    Below are the literate subjects we accept for entry on this course:

    One of the following: Business Management; Classical Studies; Economics; English; ESOL; Geography; History; Media Studies; Modern Studies; Philosophy; Politics; Psychology; Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies; Sociology

    If there is a subject that does not appear, please contact our Admissions Office (admissions@abertay.ac.uk) who will be able to confirm whether or not it would be considered for entry.

    Please visit our Entry from College pages for suitable College courses.

    See information about studying and applying to Abertay for International students.

    Qualification TypeGrade RequirementsEssential Subjects
    Higher (standard entry)BBBBLiterate subject
    Higher (minimum entry) We may make you an offer at the minimum entry grades if you meet the criteria. Find out if you're eligible for minimum entry (see below).BBCLiterate subject at B
    A-LevelCCCLiterate subject
    Irish HighersB2B2B2B2 or H3H3H3H3Literate subject
    International Baccalaureate28 PointsLiterate subject at S5 or H4
    BTEC Extended DiplomaMMMBusiness (all pathways), Enterprise & Entrepreneurship, IT (Business), Travel & Tourism
    AHEAD-Successful completion of the relevant stream of our AHEAD programme
    SWAP AccessBBBAccess to (one of the following):- University Study, Community, Education & Humanities, Arts & Social Science and Primary Teaching, Languages with Business, Languages, Arts & Social Science, Humanities & Primary Education, Arts & Humanities, Humanities, Humanities (Teaching), Degree Studies
    Qualification TypeGrade RequirementsEssential Subjects
    Advanced HigherBBBBusiness Management
    A-LevelBBBBusiness Studies
    BTEC Extended DiplomaDDDBusiness, Business (Management) or Business (Marketing)
    HNC-Our Entry from College pages list approved HNC courses
    QualificationGrade RequirementsEssential Subjects
    HND-Our Entry from College pages list approved HND courses

    We accept a wide range of qualifications from applicants from across the world. Please select your country from the searchable list below to view different qualification entry requirements. If you have different qualifications to those listed, please contact us using the form below.

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    Academic Requirements

    Applicants will typically be required to achieve CCC at A-Level, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma with an overall score of 28 points, to include any essential subject(s) at S5 or H4.

    English language: English B at S5 or H4 is accepted. For English A, no grade is specified. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically require a High School GPA of 3.0, plus one of the following:

    • SAT (I) score of 1100
    • 3 AP Tests at grades 333
    • 3 SAT Subject Tests at 600
    • ACT Composite score of 25

    A combination of AP/SAT II tests may be used, provided they are in different subjects.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) with 6 units as follows: 4 units at III, 2 units at IV, to include any essential subject(s) at III.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the European Baccalaureate with an overall grade of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

    English language: English Language 1 at grade 6 or English Language 2 at grade 7 are accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the NECO in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 54%/2.00, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%/2.70.

    English language: English at C6 or higher in the NECO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the WAEC in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 54%/2.00, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%/2.70.

    English language: English at C6 or higher in the WAEC is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomë e Maturës Shtetëore with an overall grade of 7.5, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Technique / Commercial with an overall grade of 14, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat de l'Enseignement Secondaire with an overall grade of 14, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants with national school qualilfications will typically be required to pass the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 12/20, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Trayecto Técnico Profesional with an overall grade of 6.5, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Técnico Superior/Universitario with an overall grade of 6.5, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Araratian Baccalaureate at Extended Level with grades CCC, to include any essential subjects.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary General Education wih an average of 13 and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 64%, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Year 12 Certificate plus ATAR rank of 77 or Overall Position of 11, to include any essential subject(s) at Year 12 with grade B, grade 3 or Sound Achievement.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Reifeprüfung/Maturazeugnis with an overall grade of 2.8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

    English language: English at grade 2 in the Reifeprüfung/Maturazeugnis is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Tam Orta Tahsil Hazzinda Aggestat with an average of 4, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 62%, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Shahadat Al-Thanawaya Al-Aama/General Secondary Education Certificate with an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree or post-secondary diploma in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65% or 2.25 (on the 4 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Intermediate/Higher Secondary School Certificate at an average of 2.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 50% or C+, to include any essential subject(s) at 60% or grade B.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of General Secondary Education at an average of 6, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 6.0, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur with an overall grade of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma van secundair onderwijs with an overall grade of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Abschlusszeugnis der Oberstufe des Sekundarunterrichts with an overall score of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma de Bachiller at 64%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 63%, to include any essential subject(s) at 70%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Certificate of Secondary Education at an average of 4.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70%, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificado de Conculsão de Segundo Grau with an average score of 8.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.0.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificado de Conclusão de Ensino Médio with an average score of 8.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.0.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass Brunei A Levels in 3 subjects at grades CCC, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma za Sredno Obrazonvanie with an average score of 4.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma of Upper Secondary Education at average of C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalaureat or Baccalaureat Technique at an overall grade of 12, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 12.

    Applicants will typically be required to complete the Secondary School Diploma or Diplôme d'Études Collégiales with five grade 12 subjects at an average of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Licencia de Education at an average of 4.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 4.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

    Applicants will typically be required to complete Senior Middle/High School Certificate/Diploma at an average of 75%, to include any essential subject(s) at 77%; and pass GAOKAO with 500 points (based on the 750 points scheme).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Bachiller Academico at an average of 3.25, and the first year of a university degree or Tecnico Universitario in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.3, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Svjedodžba o Maturi with an overall grade of 3.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Apolytírio Lykeíou with an overall grade of 17.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 17.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vysvědčení o maturitní zkoušce with an overall grade of 2.4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3 (Dobrý).

    Applicants will typically be required to complete the Studentereksamen (STX), including 3 Level A subjects an overall grade of 7, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

    English language: Studentereksamen English Level A or B at grade 7 is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Bachiller at an average of 7.0, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 13 / 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Gumaasiumi lõputunnistus with an average score of 3.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4; and pass 3 state examinations at a minimum of 55% (or 2 states examinations plus C1 Advanced English CAE or IELTS).

    English language: 75% in the English state examination is accepted, or C1 Advanced English CAE or IELTS (overall score 6.0 with no band lower than 5.5). For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to complete the Studentsprogv at an overall grade of 7, to include any essential subject(s) at Level A grade 7.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Ylioppilastutkinto/Studentexamen at an overall grade 4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

    English language: Advanced English at grade 5 within the Ylioppilastutkinto/Studentexamen is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Général/Professionnel/Technologique at an overall grade 12, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 13.

    English language. English at grade 14 in the Baccalauréat Général/Professionnel/Technologique is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Option Internationale du Baccalauréat at an overall grade 11, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 13.

    English language. English at grade 13 in the Option Internationale du Baccalauréat is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sashualo Skolis Atestati (Secondary School Certificate) at an average grade of 7, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Shualo Specialuri Sastsavleblis Diplomi (Special School Leaving Diploma) at an average grade of 7, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Abitur with an overall grade of 2.4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 11.

    English language: Abitur English at grade 10 is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Greek Apolytirion of Geniko Lykeio at grade 17 and 3 Pan-Hellenic exams at an average of 16, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 17.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Hong Kong HKDSE at 3333 in 4 core subjects, with elective subjects at 333 (for 3 electives) or 43 (for 2 electives), to include any essential subject(s) at 3.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Érettségi Bizonyítvány at an overall grade 4.0, with 2 higher subjects at grade 4, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Stúdentspróf at an overall grade 6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 6.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Indian Senior School (Year 12) exam at an average of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan/Madrasah Aliyah (SMK / MA) at 71%, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Post School Qualification Diploma 1 at 2.2, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants from Ireland should check the UK Year 1 Entry tab for entry requirements with Irish Highers.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Te'udat Bagrut or Bagrut with at least 2 subjects at level 5 and 1 subject at level 4 at an average of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at Level 5 with 65%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma di Esame di Stato at 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8 (on the 10 point scale) or grade 16 (on the 20 point scale).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Upper Secondary School Leaving Certificate at grade 3.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Completed Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70% / 2.33, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) at an average of B, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 50%, to include any essential subject(s) at 55%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.4, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Atestas par vispārējo vidējo izglītību with an average score of 7, to include 3 state exams at a minimum of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 70%.

    English language: 80% in the English state exam is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Libanais or Baccalauréat II with 12, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 12.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Brandos Atestatas with an average score of 7 with a minimum of 70% in 3 state exams, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.

    English language: 80% in the English state exam is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplôme de Fin d'Études Secondaires at an overall grade of 42, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 44.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Higher Secondary Education with 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 73%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Ensino Secundário Complementar with grade 2.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Cambridge Overseas Higher School Certificate (COHSC) with grades CCC, to include any essential subject(s) at grade C.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Malawian School Certificate of Education at grade 5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 60%, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM) with a minimum of 3 subjects at BCC or 2.30 GPA, to include any essential subject(s) at grade B/3.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Unified Examination Certificate (UEC) with 4 subjects at 70% / B5 B5 B5 B5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 75%/B5.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Matriculation Certificate Examination with grades BC at Advanced level and CCCC at Intermediate level, to include any essential subject(s) at Advanced level grade C.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomă de Bacalaureat with an overall grade of 6.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary Education at 70%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 70%, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Higher Secondary Education Certificate (HSC) with 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Voorbereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO) with an overall score of 6.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

    English language: English at grade 8 in HAVO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Secondary School Leaving Diploma/Matura with an overall grade of 3.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vitnemål for Vidergaende Opplaering with an overall average of 3.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

    English language: English at grade 4 in the Vitnemål for Vidergaende Opplaering is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Higher Secondary School Certificate at an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 60%/2.5, to include any essential subject(s) at 68%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Matura with an average score of 60%, to include 3 Advanced subjects at a minimum of 50%, to include any essential subject(s) at Advanced level with a score of 70%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma/Certificado Nível Secundário de Educação with an overall grade of 14, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 16.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Qatar Senior School Certificate (Shahadat Al-Thanawaya Al-Aama) at an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 2.0/70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 2.5/75%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomă de Bacalaureat with an overall grade of 7, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Attestat o Srednem Obrzovanii (Certificate of Secondary Education) at an average of 4, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.5, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Secondary Education Certificate (Tawjihiyah) with an average of 60%, and either the post-secondary diploma or first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.0/70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 75%.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass Singapore GCE A-Levels with grades CCC, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 75%/B5.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vysvedčenie o maturitnej skúške at grade 2.4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

    English language: English at B2 level at grade 2 in the Vysvedčenie o maturitnej skúške is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Maturitetno spričevalo at grade 3.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the National Senior Certificate (with Matriculation Endorsement) with 4 subjects at 5555, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Bachiller with an average score of 6.8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sudan School Certificate with an average of 60%/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%/B, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Avgangsbetyg/Slutbetyg fran Gymnasieskola with an average score of 15.5, to include any essential subject(s) at level 5 grade B.

    English language: English Level 5 at grade B or English Level 6 at grade C in the Avgangsbetyg/Slutbetyg fran Gymnasieskola is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificat de Maturité or the Maturitätszeugnis or the Attestato Di Maturità with an overall grade of 4.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass Maturitätszeugnis with an overall grade of 4.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Attestato Di Maturità with an overall grade of 4.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.4, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to complete the Certificate of Secondary Education/Maw 6 with an average of 70%/3.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3; or complete the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 2.0, to include any essential subject(s) at 2.5.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the High School Diploma at an average of 55%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 2.9 (on the 5 point scale) or 55 (on the 100 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.5, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65% / 2.2 (on the 4 point scale) / 4.0 (on the 5 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Secondary Education Certificate Examination at 65%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 2.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.3.

    Applicants will typically require a High School GPA of 3.0, plus one of the following:

    • SAT (I) score of 1100
    • 3 AP Tests at grades 333
    • 3 SAT Subject Tests at 600
    • ACT Composite score of 25

    A combination of AP/SAT II tests may be used, provided they are in different subjects.

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma of Academic Lyceum at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 60%, to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Técnico Superior Universitario, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 50% / 6.1 (on the 10 point scale) / 12 (on the 20 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

    Applicants will typically be required to pass the Zimbabwe General Certificate of Education at Advanced Level with grades CCC, to include any essential subject(s).


    English Language Requirements

    All courses at Abertay University are taught in English. If your first language is not English, you will need to demonstrate that you meet our English language requirements. Accepted English language qualifications include:

    IELTS - overall score of 6.0 with no band lower than 5.5

    TOEFL - overall score of 78 (individual elements: L-17, R-18, S-20, W-17)

    Cambridge FCE/CAE/CPE - overall score of 169 on Cambridge Grading Scale

    International Baccalaureate - English B at S5 or H4, English A no specific grade required

    European Baccalaureate - English Language 1 at grade 6 or English Language 2 at grade 7

    You do not need to prove your knowledge of English language if you are a national of certain countries. Please see English Language Requirements for the full list of accepted qualifications and further details.

     

    If your academic qualifications aren't listed above, or if you have any further questions, please contact our international team using the form below. There is also lots of useful information for international applicants on our international pages.


    Contact our International Team

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    Not sure if you're eligible for entry?

    If you have the potential and motivation to study at university, regardless of your background or personal circumstances, we welcome your application.

    We understand some people have faced extra challenges before applying to university, which is why we consider the background in which your academic grades have been achieved when making an offer.

    If you expect to receive passes in three Scottish Highers (grades A-C) and have either ...

    • Been in care;
    • Participated in a targeted aspiration-raising programme such as LIFT OFF, LEAPS, FOCUS West, or Aspire North;
    • No family background of going to university;
    • Attended a school or lived in an area where not many people go to university;

    ... then we encourage you to submit an application.

    Fees and funding

    The course fees you'll pay and the funding available to you depends on factors such as your nationality, location, personal circumstances and the course you are studying. 

    More information

    Find out about grants, bursaries, tuition fee loans, maintenance loans and living costs in our undergraduate fees and funding section.

    Scholarships

    There are a range of scholarships to help support your studies with us.

    As well as Abertay scholarships for English, Welsh, Northern Irish and international students, there are corporate and philanthropic scholarships available. Some are course specific, many are not. There are some listed below or you can visit the Undergraduate scholarship pages.

    View all

    The Robert Reid Bursary

    Two £1,000 awards for students who have overcome challenges to attend university.

    Abertay International Scholarship

    This is an award of up to £12,000 for prospective international undergraduate students.

    Abertay rUK Scholarship

    This is a £4000 award for prospective undergraduate students applying from England, Wales or Northern Ireland.

    Careers

    When you graduate with a Business Management degree, you can expect to enter careers in a wide-range of sectors. Graduates from our business school have enjoyed graduate trainee success in organisations such as BT, while others have gone on to work for household names such as:

    • Rolls Royce
    • Alliance Trust
    • Scottish Government
    • NCR
    • Atlas Copco
    • Scottish and Southern Energy (SSE)

     

    Choose Your Path

    The roles our graduates have taken range from Human Resource Manager, Project Planning and Risk Officer, Business Analyst and CEO of their own company. Others have taken a different route into primary and secondary education, teaching the business professionals of the future.

     

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    Industry Links

    The School of Business, Law & Social Sciences has a rich history of working with employers from a range of backgrounds at all levels of study. The capstone to this is the Innovation for Global Growth (IGG) initiative in the final year of your degree.

    This provides a unique opportunity for you to test your employability skills with significant industry, commerce and public sector employers. Previous client organisations have included Heineken, Michelin, Tokheim, NCR, RBS, NHS Scotland, Harris Tweed and Thorntons.

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    Get inspired

    Meet some of our Business graduates and find out what they've gone on to do.

    Headshot of graduate smiling

    Katie MacDonald

    Katie is a Business Graduate at Babcock International Group.

    Find out more

    A photo of Amelie Mariage

    Amélie Mariage

    Named as one of Forbes 30 under 30 social entrepreneurs in 2016.

    Find out more

    Vikki in FIFA Assistant Referee uniform holding a whistle and cards

    Vikki Allan

    Vikki is a Service Delivery Manager and FIFA Assistant Referee.

    Find out more

    Unistats

    Unistats collates comparable information in areas students have identified as important in making decisions about what and where to study. The core information it contains is called the Unistats dataset (formerly the Key Information Set (KIS)).

    Ready for more? Take the next step

    Virtual Open Day

    Talk to lecturers, engage with current and past students, and see our perfect city centre campus.

    Get a Prospectus

    Our undergraduate prospectus is a great read if you are thinking about doing your degree at Abertay.

    Find out how to apply

    Everything you need to apply from UCAS deadlines to entry requirements.

    Ask a Question

    Get all of your questions answered: call us, email us or chat online. We are here to help!