Stephen Annis

Stephen is a Paralegal at Blackadders and he’ll soon be a Trainee Solicitor.

BA (Hons) Criminological Studies, 2014

Tell us about your job and what it involves?

I joined Blackadders about 3 years ago. First I was in Residential Conveyancing, and then about a year after that I got the chance to move into Commercial, which is a bit more in depth. It’s maybe not as fast paced, but it’s something I enjoy and I think it’s something I’ll look into as a career path.

I start as a Trainee Solicitor next month I’ll be on a training contract for the next two years.

That kind of job must be all consuming?

Yes! There’s no requirement to work after hours but if you have a case that needs it, you do it. Simple as that. You’re the one the client is going to phone the next day in the office to ask if something has been done.

Can it be difficult to wind down?

It can be. Everyone has their own way of dealing with things and their own hobbies outside of work. It’s certainly not the worst profession for it, but it can become your life to some extent.

How did you end up in your current job?

I studied Criminology at Abertay and quite liked the legal aspect of it. Rather than drift into a graduate scheme, I thought I’d try and pursue that as a career. I then did an accelerated law degree at Robert Gordon University so I could work while I studied. I joined Blackadders at the start of my second year.

How did your time at Abertay help you get to where you are now?

Obviously I studied Law at a later date and that gave me the hard skills I needed for the profession, but I think my time at Abertay gave me some of the softer skills - crucially analysis and critical thinking. They’re very useful to have and they set you apart. 

I’d never experienced anything like my dissertation and probably won’t again. It was quite unique and it was good to have that relationship with your fellow students.
Stephen Annis | Blackadders | Paralegal

 

Did anyone or anything have a lasting impact on you during your time here?

The whole idea of critical thinking and not taking things at face value. That’s what a lot of criminological theory is underpinned by; the idea that you should question things. That helps in the legal profession – and really, helps in every profession.

What’s your most memorable moment from your time as a student here?

Doing my dissertation. I’d never experienced anything like it and probably won’t again. It was quite unique and it was good to have that relationship with your fellow students. We were all doing this at the same time and no one really knew what they were doing! You also have that relationship with your mentor and I think that’s one thing that sticks out to me.

Do you have any advice for our current students?

Do what you want to do. I could easily have thought that it was too much bother to pursue what I wanted to do, which was law. You might say I took more of an unusual path to get there, but I’d say it’s worth doing that in the end. I love what I do and that’s the main thing.

 

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