BA (Hons) Accounting and Finance

Professionally accredited by three industry bodies, this Accounting and Finance degree will prepare you for a challenging and rewarding career in the financial world.

Course detail

Start Date

September

Duration

4 years (full-time)

Award Title

BA (Hons)

UCAS Code

N400

Why study Abertay's BA (Hons) in Accounting and Finance?

Join our professionally accredited Accounting and Finance degree and learn how to work at the financial heart of any business. Become empowered to solve problems, make decisions and manage, lead and grow all types of organisations. 

This degree is designed to give you the knowledge and hands-on experience you need to work in accounting and finance. Get set to think in different ways, unleash your creativity and explore the financial core of the business world. 

We prepare you to hit the ground running thanks to live business projects and simulations set by companies such as Sky, Enterprise Rent-A-Car and Children 1st.

  • All the skills you need for a career in accountancy, taxation, auditing and corporate finance.
  • Professional body accreditation from CIMA, ACCA and AIA.
  • The key management skills necessary to deliver a financially and environmentally sustainable performance across a wide range of organisations.
  • An enhanced CV filled with activities such as the IBM Universities Business Challenge and Entrepreneurial Brains Made on Campus (EMBC) in association with Germany’s Stuttgart Media University.
  • If you want to start your own business, or work as a freelancer, Bell Street Ventures is on campus to help you.
  • You have the option of international study and a work placement.

Why study this course here:

  • Sunday Times UK University of the Year 2020 for Teaching Quality.
  • Guardian University Guide 2020 Top 10 in the UK for Student Satisfaction with TeachingCourse and Feedback.
  • National Student Survey 2020 Top 10 UK Universities for Student Satisfaction.

We put employability at the forefront by focusing on current themes in business management. You will develop the knowledge and transferrable skills required to become a professional manager in a digital environment.

So whether your ambition is to start your own business or work within an organisation, your skills will be relevant all over the world.

Always-On Online Open Day

We aim to immerse you in student life here at Abertay and give you a true feel for our courses and our amazing academic community.

Experience our Always-On Open Day anytime for a mix of:

  • Subject and course presentations and videos.

  • Campus tours, info on applying, funding, student support and accommodation.

  • What the city of Dundee is like to live in.

Take time to soak it all in.

SEE ONLINE OPEN DAY

 

An Abertay Student on a yellow coloured background

How the Course Works

It’s flexible

Tailor what you study to suit your own interests and career aspirations. This degree is part of a larger portfolio of 12 courses covering business, accounting and marketing.  

The first two years covers a common curriculum including the basics of business, accounting, and marketing meaning there’s the flexibility to swap between all of or some of the courses depending when you join.

The course options within the Accounting stream are:

Joining us in Year 1: You can choose to specialise within Accounting, add one of the  extra subjects above to it, or even move to a marketing or business course in year 2. In year 3 you can still move within any of the courses in the Accounting stream.

Joining us in Year 2 or 3: You can transfer within the Accounting stream at the start of both years except for Accounting and Finance with law.

Shape your own learning journey

Our academics will provide advice and full support about transferring, and help you choose your modules as you progress through the years. 

Your chosen specialism will be reflected in your degree title e.g. BA (Hons) Accounting and Finance with Law - or if you choose not to specialise, you will graduate in BA (Hons) Accounting and Finance.

Transfering between the courses is straightforward, so only apply for one of them.

Learning and Assessment

You’ll be assessed via a combination of methods:

  • Portfolio projects
  • Presentations
  • Examinations
  • Group work
  • Simulations
  • Work assessments.

We also have international partner institutions, from the US to Asia, and all stops in between, where you can study in English for a term or a year. This is an excellent opportunity to boost your CV, as it shows your willingness to experience different cultures and methods of working.

Take part in entrepreneurial initiatives

In addition to developing solutions to live business problems, in many of your modules you'll be encouraged to take part in entrepreneurial initiatives to gain additional experience of group working and industry exposure. This is also a great opportunity to work with students from other programmes of study.

tow females studying together using books and paper notepads

Compete in International business competitions

In association with Stuttgart Media University in Germany, students are tasked with identifying a social or economic challenge and finding a solution to this which they then present back to former students and industry professionals. The top teams are invited to Germany to participate in the final.

Work on UK wide initiatives

Sponsored by IBM, this UK-wide initiative sees our students competing against other UK universities in hope of winning recognition for the best solution to a social enterprise challenge through simulation activities. We've had five teams in the final over the past nine years!

Male & female working together in front of a laptop

Solve real world business problems

Students are asked to come up with solutions to real business problems set by organisations from a range of business sectors, including food and drink, banking, textiles, and telecoms. Working in small teams, students have to apply their studies to practical problems currently being faced by those businesses, before pitching their solution back to the company. 

About Your Modules

The module information featured is intended as an example only, describing the modules our students are taking this year. Modules are reviewed annually and may be subject to change. If you receive an offer to study with us we will send you a Programme document  that sets out exactly which modules you can expect to take as part of your Abertay University degree programme. Please see Terms and Conditions for more information.

Modules

Year 1 Core Modules

You must study and pass all four core modules

Brief description

Introduction to the disciplines of financial and management accounting.

Indicative content:

  • Introduction to Financial Accounting and Management Accounting: Accounting theory and practice: different branches of accounting. The differences between financial and management accounting.
  • Different Types of Business Organisation: The key concepts in financial accounting and the regulatory framework of financial accounting.
  • Basic Accounting Practice: The production of Income Statements and Balance Sheets for a sole trader, including basic adjustments and financial ratios.
  • Cost Behavious and Measuring Operational Performance: The classification of costs and revenues and understanding implications of cost behaviour. Using marginal costing to support short term decision-making. Measuring relevant costs and revenues for decision-making; limiting factors, close-down, make or buy and other shirt-term decisions. CVP Analysis for a single product. 
  • Information for Planning, Control and Decision-making: The budgeting process. Preparation of cash budgets. Behavioural aspects of budgeting. Sources of management information.
  • Study techniques: Revising for exams.

Brief description

Introduction to the key theories, concepts and functions of management.

Indicative content:

  • Organisational and work design: Organisational structure, division of labour, job design.
  • Management theories: Evolution of management theories including, classical, motivational, systems, quality movement, knowledge management.
  • Leadership theories: Foundation of leadership including trait, behavioural and situational theories.
  • Management in practice: Managers roles and competencies, management functions: planning; leading; organising; controlling.

Brief description

Introduction to finance and statistics.

Indicative content:

  • Types of data: Different types of data: cross-sectional vs time series, qualitative vs quantitative.
  • Key concepts: Key statistics concepts, including descriptive vs inferential statistics, population-case-sample and variable.
  • Descriptive statistics-qualitative variables (using SPSS): Summarising and visualising one qualitative variable and using cross-tabulation to analyse the relationship between two qualitative variables.
  • Descriptive statistics-quantitative variables (using SPSS): Analysing one quantitative variable (using SPSS and manual calculations); analysing one quantitative variable between groups; and analysing the relationship between two quantitative variables using Scatter Diagram, Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient and Linear Regression.
  • Time series analysis (using Excel): The concepts of trend, seasonality and randomness. How to use time series plots to understand data movements over time. How to calculate the linear trend and seasonal component of linear time series and use those to forecast future time series values.
  • Time value of money: Why money has a higher value today than in the future. Develop a set of tools to use throughout the rest of the module. Analysing single cash flows and annuity cash flows.
  • Bond valuation: What bonds are, how to price them and why they are important to the firm.
  • Stock valuation: What stocks are, how to price them and why they are important to the firm. The main stock markets in the world.
  • Risk and return: Portfolio theory. Learn how to characterise and estimate risk and return.

Brief description

ADD BMT108 Business Economics

Indicative content

  • Content topics in bullets in bold like this: With content description not bold 

Year 1 Option Modules

You must study and pass one option module of your chosing from Term 1. From Term 2 you must study a mandatory module, Introduction to Tax (ANF206) plus one more module of your choosing

Brief description

The fundamentals of contemporary marketing theory and practice.

Indicative content:

  • Making sense of marketing: The nature of marketing within the contemporary environment.The digital transformation of the marketing function.
  • The marketing environment: Methods of evaluating the marketing environment including the use of digital tools and market research. The importance of customers, competitors and other stakeholders in the marketing environment to business performance. 
  • The marketing mix: The evolution of the marketing mix and the informed alignment of the elements of the mix to support organisational goals and objectives. 
  • Managing the marketing practice: The influences and issues involved in making marketing decisions e.g. globalisation, sustainability and understanding the customer.

Brief description

Introduction to the human resource management function within organisations.

Indicative content

  • Personnel management to human resource management- a historical perspective: The origins of personnel management, emergence of HRM, hard and soft HRM
  • The role of line managers and HRM practitioners: The range and scope of HR activities, distinction between operational and strategic HR activities, the role of the line manager in HR activities
  • Employee resourcing: Human resource planning; pre recruitment activities, recruitment, selection, employer branding
  • Employee development: Talent planning; training and development methods, designing learning and development, induction
  • Employee relations: Control, power and authority in the employment relationship, HRM and employee relations, employee voice, employee participation
  • Employee reward: Forms of reward, management of reward, reward systems, base pay. incremental pay schemes, contingency pay
  • Performance management: measuring performance, performance appraisal, dealing with poor performance.

Brief description

Introduction to tax.

Indicative content

  • Introduction to taxation: General introduction to UK tax system; Administration of tax system; Tax evasion; Tax avoidance; HMRC Charter; Introduction to Income tax.
  • Sources of income: Basis of assessment and allowable expenditure; Capital expenditure; Personal allowances and reliefs; Income and losses arising from property; Employee’s liability for National Insurance contributions.
  • Income from employment: Basis of assessment; Employment income; Non-taxable employment income; Deductible expenses; Administration of the Pay As you Earn (PAYE) system; Benefit-in-kind.
  • Income from self-employment: The calculation of trading profits; Disallowed and allowable expenditure; Trading income allowance ; Basis periods for trading income; Commencement of trade; Cessation of trade; Change of accounting date; Capital allowances; Trading losses and relief; partnerships.

Brief description

Develop a range of skills, knowledge and techniques within the natural, technological and social sciences that are relevant to the study of environmental sustainability and concurrently, life in the twenty-first century. 

Indicative content

  • The Challenge of Sustainable Development: Problems associated with life in the 21st Century and the relationship to scientific provisionalism and uncertainty are discussed.
  • The Genesis of Sustainable Development Concept: Developments associated with the Club of Rome are outlined while Limits to Growth and the Tragedy of the Commons are discussed.
  • Evolution of Sustainable Development: The Reo Summit and Suitability, and Policy Developments thereof will be discussed.
  • Mainstreaming Sustainability: Sustainability and Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience, as individual and social concerns, will be evaluated. And their role in transformation will be discussed.
  • Communicating Sustainability: Human well-being, Environmental Justice, Environmental Policy and the practicalities of Sustainability in Scotland are discussed.
  • Sustainable Development in Practice: Community Empowerment associated with Land Reform. Energy Production and Food Production in Tayside..
  • Ethics and Sustainability Policy: Active citizenship and Globalisation.
  • Innovating Locally, Transforming Globally: Transformations that are required to embrace Sustainability.
  • Active Relationship for Sustainable Futures: Thinking Globally, acting locally.

Brief description

Social, managerial, economic, political and technical challenges and opportunities associated with emerging renewable energy innovation, production, supply and consumption.

Indicative content

  • Renewable Energy Nontechnical Challenges and Opportunities: Social and political challenges and opportunities of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Economic and environmental challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Strategic and managerial challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption.
  • Renewable Energy Technological Challenges and Opportunities:. Geotechnical and Geophysical information. Technical limitations and challenges of energy distribution systems and energy storage. Current technological development trend, collaborative innovation in renewable energy.

Brief description

Skills and knowledge required to manage the finance of an event.

Indicative content

  • Sources of funding: Determining where funding will come from for your event; funding policies; funding applications to external sponsors; convincing sponsors of the benefits of funding your event.
  • Budgeting and breakeven: Understanding the types of costs involved in the project;  Preparing a simple budget and analysing a complex (pre-prepared) budget; Creating a break-even analysis.
  • Controlling finances: Pre-event controls, operational controls, post control mechanisms.

Brief description

The importance of digital technology in the marketing function in today’s organisation. 

Indicative content: 

  • Introduction to digital marketing: Discussing the impact of digital transformation on the marketing function. Creating digital strategies that are integrated within the wider marketing strategy and support the organisational goals and objectives.
  • Understanding the digital marketing environment: Examining the internal and external facets of the digital environment that the company operates within including competitors, the digital consumer and the wider digital landscape.
  • The planning process: Exploring the models and methods of planning your digital strategies based on audit data, social listening and company objectives. 
  • Media and tools planning : Selecting the appropriate tools and media to use to support the implementation of the digital marketing strategy.

Year 1 Core Modules

You must study and pass all six core modules

Brief description

Business Analytics is generally thought to comprise three broad categories: descriptive analytics, predictive analytics, and prescriptive analytics. You need no prior higher education experience in statistics.

Indicative content

  • Descriptive statistics: Descriptive statistics to summarize data. Modifying data using Excel, measures of location, measures of variability, measures of association between two variables and data cleansing.
  • Data visualisation: The most common forms of visualising data and when each form is appropriate. The human mind can process visual images such as charts much faster than it can interpret rows of numbers.
  • Probability - modelling uncertainty: Basic relationships of probability, conditional probability, random variables and probability distributions.
  • Descriptive data mining: Cluster analysis, association rules and text mining.
  • Statistical inference: Sample selection, point estimation, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis tests.
  • Simple linear regression: The least squares method and the fit of the model.
  • Multiple linear regression: Extension of the simple linear regression model to incorporate multiple independent variables. Statistical inference in regressions, categorical independent variables, model fitting and prediction using regression models.
  • Time series analysis and forecasting: Time series patterns, forecast accuracy, moving averages and using regression analysis for forecasting.

Brief description

Different forms of taxation and calculations. 

Indicative content

  • Pension contributions: Registered pension schemes: Tax relief for contributions  by scheme members; Tax relief for contributions  by employers; Annual allowance charge; Lifetime allowance charge.
  • Chargeable gains for individuals: Introduction to capital gains tax; Calculation of capital gains/losses and liabilities arising on disposals; basis of assessment; Rates of CGT; Administration of CGT; Chattels and wasting assets; Gains and losses on the disposal of shares and securities; CGT reliefs.
  • Corporation tax and corporate groups: Introduction to corporation tax; Scope of corporation tax; Accounting periods; Taxable total profits; Trading income; Corporate chargeable gains; Computation and payment of  the corporation tax liability; Corporation tax losses; Close companies and investment companies; consortia; Groups of companies and reconstructions. 
  • Value added tax: Principles; Taxable persons and supplies; exemptions, zero rated, partly exempt businesses; Registration and Deregistration; Accounting for VAT; Administration of VAT.
  • Inheritance tax: Chargeable transfers of value; The use of exemptions in deferring and minimising inheritance tax liabilities; Inheritance tax payable on chargeable lifetime transfers; Inheritance tax payable on death; Valuation; Business property relief; Agricultural property relief; Administration of Inheritance tax.
  • Overseas taxation: Residence and domicile; Double taxation relief ; Diverted profits tax ;controlled foreign companies; Overseas aspects of personal and corporate taxation.

Brief description

Techniques used in financial and management accounting.

Indicative content

  • Basic financial accounting: Double-entry bookkeeping. Internal Control: errors - their prevention, detection and correction; accounting ledger systems, trial balance, suspense accounts and journals. 
  • Incomplete records: Preparation of final accounts of a limited company from incomplete records, and prepare bank reconciliation statement. 
  • Accounting for costs: Accounting for material: FIFO, LIFO, Weighted Average. Accounting for labour: labour costs, idle time, incentives and labour turnover. 
  • Pricing methods and pricing decisions: Cost plus, target costing, price skimming, penetration pricing 
  • Budgeting: The context of budgets. Approaches to budgeting. Interpreting and acting on budgets. Preparation of functional budgets from given data. Budgeting and performance analysis in not-for-profit organisations and the public sector 
  • Taxation: The impact of taxation on companies, calculating corporation tax.

Brief description

The fundamental areas of civil law.and an understanding of the 'legal system' in general. 

Indicative content

  • Legal systems: The nature of law; the distinction between civil and criminal law;sources of law; the structure of the courts; impact of EU law on Scots law.
  • Contract: Nature and formation; essential features and validity; terms of the contract; breach of contract; extinction of contractual obligations.
  • Delict: Nature of delict; culpa and negligence; strict and vicarious liability; Consumer Protection Act 1987; defences to an action in delict.
  • Employment law and business organisations: Nature of employment and contractual relationship; unfair and wrongful dismissal; health and safety in the workplace. Business Organisations and legal framework - Law of Agency, Partnerships and Company law.

Brief description

The basics of management accounting in its role in shaping long term decisions, in planning and in control and presenting reports to management.

Indicative content

  • Further issues in costing: Overhead allocation, apportionment and absorption; compilation of process costing statements and joint costing statements using FIFO and Weighted Average considering opening and closing stocks; throughput costing.
  • Marginal costing: Cost-volume profit analysis for multi-product. Absorption and Marginal costing compared.
  • Capital investment appraisal: Investment appraisal methods; Net Present Value, Payback, Internal Rate of Return and Accounting Rate of Return. Strengths and weaknesses of these methods. Sensitivity analysis applied to capital investment appraisal. 
  • Working capital: The nature and importance of working capital. Management of working capital. Determining working capital needs. 
  • Variance analysis: Calculation and interpretation of variances. Reconciliation of actual to planned performance by means of variances. Distinguish between planning and operational and operational variances. Role of MRP and ERP systems in supporting standard costing systems.Material mix and yield variances, sales mix and quantity variances.

Brief description

This module seeks to expose students¿ to regulatory frameworks that underpin the preparation of financial statements for different forms of business organisations. It also seeks to develop students¿ ability to prepare partnership accounts and limited liability companies¿ general-purpose financial statement based on relevant standards issued by the IASB.

Indicative content

  • Introduction to accounting and reporting frameworks: Accounting framework for a sole trader, a partnership and a limited liability company.
  • Partnerships: Legal background. appropriations, admissions/retirements, dissolutions and conversion to a limited company.
  • Financial statements for limited liability companies: Preparation and presentation of general purpose financial statements based on the provisions of relevant IASs/IFRSs issued by IASB.
  • Accounting treatments for current assets (inventories IAS2, trade receivables)
  • 5. Accounting treatments for non-current assets (tangible/intangible/impairment IAS36)
  • Calculation and interpretation of accounting ratios and trends; Earnings per shareIAS33 limitations of ratios. 
  • Prepare and report financial performance to address financial information users and stakeholder needs. 
  • Financial Reporting and basic group accounting with associates IFRS3, IFRS10

Year 3 Core Modules

You must study and pass all three core modules

Brief description

The use of management accounting for management control and advanced numerical techniques in decision-making.

Indicative content:

  • Control: Divisional performance appraisal. Transfer pricing. Aspects of modern management practice and accounting issues within different sectors (including social enterprise). Business Plans and management reports. Life-cycle costing.
  • Decision analysis: An introduction to Activity Based Costing and Activity Based Management. Decisions under uncertainty, including decision trees and the value of information.
  • Strategic management accounting techniques: Value Management: value chain analysis, economic value added. The use of strategic management accounting techniques within an organisation: target costing, linear programming, Learning Curve and Experience Curve and Regression analysis and cost estimation and other forecasting techniques. Performance analysis in NPF organisations and the public sector.

Brief description

Introduction to corporate finance. Gain knowledge of the main sources of corporate finance and the ability to apply key techniques to use and manage finance in large and small organisations.

Indicative content:

  • Time value of money: Future Value and Present Value; Annuities and Perpetuities; Quotes rates, Effective Annual Rate and Annual Percentage Rate.
  • Bond valuation: Bond Pricing; Bond Ratings; Interest Rate Risk; Determination of Bond Yields.
  • Equity valuation: Ordinary and Preference Shares; Cash Flow Valuation.
  • Capital budgeting: Net Present Value, Payback Rule and Other Investment Criteria; Pro forma Financial Statements; Special Cases of Discounted Cash Flow; Scenario Analysis; Sensitivity Analysis; Break-Even Analysis.
  • Risk and return: Expected Returns and Variances; Systemic and Unsystematic Risk; Diversification and Portfolio Risk; Systemic Risk and Beta; the Security Market Line and CAPM.
  • Cost of capital: The Cost of Equity; the Cost of Debt and Preference Shares; the Weighted Average Cost of Capital.
  • Financial leverage and capital structure policy: The effect of Financial Leverage; Capital Structure and the Cost of Equity; Modigliani & Miller Propositions and the value of the firm; Optimal Capital Structure; the Pecking-Order Theory.
  • Dividends and pay-out policy: Cash Dividends and Dividend Payments; Does Dividend Policy Matter? Low vs. High-Dividend Pay-out; Shares Repurchases.
  • Short-term financial planning and management: Reasons for holding Cash; Understanding Float; Investing Idle Cash; Determining the Target Cash Balance; Optimal Credit Policy; Inventory Management.

Brief description

The application of financial accounting theory and practice to current issues in accounting, and the development of international financial accounting theory and practice.

Indicative content:

  • Statements of cash flows IAS7: Preparation of statements of cash flows. Cash and cash equivalents; classification of cash flows by activities, Indirect and direct methods. The Interests, dividends and taxes on cash flows. Working capital changes and cash flows.
  • Accounting for groups: The conceptual basis of accounting for the investment of one entity in another entity; preparation of group accounts including inter- company balances, unrealised profit on inter-company sales and acquisitions during the year.
  • Accounting treatments under IAS and IFRS: Provisions IAS37, post balance sheet events IAS10 Leases, IAS17, IFRS16 Financial instruments. IAS32, IAS39, IFRS7, IFRS9.

Year 3 Option Modules

You must study and pass one option module from Term 1 and two from Term 2

Brief description

How companies can improve their competitiveness by using digital solutions.Exploiting technology to transform service delivery through Internet portals, intra-corporate connected environments, social networks. Transforming internal processes and ways of working with partners are strategic issues considered by most organisations, both large and small. 

Indicative content

  • Meaning and scope of e-business and e-commerce: Introduction and overview: current trends and issues. The evolution of e-business.
  • Analysis of firm's external environment: The macro-environment and implications for e-business ventures. Defining industry, segments and target markets for e-business.
  • Analysis of firm's internal environment: The meaning of core competence in e-business; the four virtual spaces of the ICDT framework for interaction with customers; the meaning of the company's value chain and value network.
  • Foundations of value creation in e-business: Understanding of what the value is and elements that contribute to value creation; the value grid and levers of e-value creation.
  • Dealing with disruptive innovations in e-business: Successful imitation and the barriers to imitation; how companies can assess the threat of a disruptive innovation; the ways to deal with a disruptive innovation in e- business. The trade-off between richness and reach in e-business; customer relationship management in the digital context; the concept of mass-customisation.Business models and revenue models in digital business; Digital transformation: a blend of digital technology, people, innovation and creativity; Doing digital (i.e. tactical solutions) vs being digital (i.e. strategic solutions); Implementation by creating a competitive advantage; Protecting digital business from imitation.

Brief description

The societal and political pressures organisations face to rapidly reach achieve zero carbon emissions. Develop the skills needed to evaluate an organisation's current environmental impact and create and implement a new strategy to reduce this impact. 

Indicative content

  • Examine why environmental stewardship is important for any business to pursue, and why that importance will likely grow stronger in the future.
  • Methods for evaluating an organisations current environmental impact
  • Defining initiatives that fill gaps between the current state and the future vision and constructing a roadmap for achieving the vision.
  • To introduce and explain business process transformation methodologies, with supporting technology and tools, that focus on increasing operational efficiency and reducing waste. E.g. IBM’s Green Sigma methodology.
  • Frameworks for developing and implementing a green strategy, and illustrate the benefits many organisations have realised in each strategic area.

Brief description

The theory of policy development and its effects on organisations and vice versa. 

Indicative content

  • What is public policy: The process by which governments translate their political vision and ideologies into programmes and actions to deliver outcomes and desired changes in the real world. 
  • The policy process: The foundations, importance and goals of public policy. The stages of the policy cycle and the political factors that influence them.
  • Theories of power and the policy process: Apply the theory such as, Rational Actor Theory and Institutional theory to real-world policy case studies. 
  • How organisations shape and impact on policy: How organisations and industry representatives such as lobbyists can inform, persuade, pressure and influence governments, policy makers and public policy to help serve their interests. 
  • Public policy and the operation of organisations: How public policies and government influence markets for sustainable businesses; Why public policy is important to sustainable business and business more generally; Key influencers and the impacts of relationship of public policy and why public policymaking does not always serve the public interest.

Direct entrants to stge 3 can also choose this module as one of their two.

ANF206 Tax 2

Brief description

Introduction to financial markets and institutions. The role, functions and tools of the financial services industry in the context of both domestic economies and the world economy and international trade.

Module content:

  • Money and the financial system: The Six Parts of the Financial System; What is Money and How Can We Measure It? The Payment System.
  • Bond markets and interests rates: The Bond Market and the Determination of Interests Rates; Ratings and the Risk Structure of Interests Rates; The Yield Curve; Theories of the Term Structure of Interests Rates.
  • Stock markets and derivatives: The Essential Characteristics of Common Stock; Measuring the Level of the Stock Market; Investing in Stocks for the Long Run; What are Derivatives?; Forwards and Futures; Options; Swaps.
  • Financial institutions: The Role of Financial Intermediaries; Information Asymmetries and Information Costs; Bank Management; Bank Risk: Where it comes from and what to do about it?
  • Central banking and monetary policy: Understanding the Central Bank's Balance Sheet; Monetary Base; the Money Multiplier and Money Supply; Monetary Policy; Unconventional Monetary Policy Tools.
  • Regulation and financial crises: The Need for Regulating the Financial System; The Government Safety Net; Regulation and Supervision of the Financial System; Financial Crises.
  • Foreign exchange: Exchange Rates Determination and Foreign Exchange Markets.
  • Current topics on financial markets and institutions: The Euro Debate; Socially Responsible Investment; Islamic Finance; Microcredit.

Brief description

Spend a specified time in a business environment working in an area related to your programme.

Module content:

  • Placement preparation: Placement workshops (max 3 x 1 hour) to prepare for the placement, including CV preparation. Discuss placement options with placement tutor.
  • Placement briefing: Responsibilities of all parties involved; expectations; professional conduct.
  • Experiential learning: Supervised placement carried out 1 day per week for 10 weeks (preferred structure) or 10-day block; feedback; employer assessment, student reflection on performance while on placement.
  • Placement check: Discussions between the placement tutor, student and employer to ensure satisfactory progress is being made.
  • Placement presentation: Poster presentation on your placement learning and employability skills development, and on learning through experience to peers and employers.
  • Business investigation/Business project: Research within the placement organisation, a business/management issue, or participate in a workplace project and report on the findings/outcomes.

Brief description

The challenges facing contemporary business organisations in an operating context in which they are expected not only to demonstrate an economic contribution and shareholder value, but increasingly, to do so in a manner that reflects the interests of a range of stakeholder groups and being sustainable.

Indicative content

  • The changing context of business: The changing nature of organisations: from industrial to post-industrial society; globalisation structures, processes and arguments; 
  • Sustainable business practice: Corporate social responsibility and The Business and Society Relationship; Corporate Citizenship: Social Responsibility, Responsiveness, and Business Performance 
  • Employee well being at work: Employees as stakeholders: issues relating to privacy, safety and employee well-being 
  • The role of third sector organisations; Social and economic exclusion and business; understanding the conditions of inequality and social exclusion; factors influencing social mobility, The social contribution of third sector organisations
  • Corporate social responsibility:  Public Policy and governance: public and third sector 

Brief description

The skills and knowledge needed to launch a small business successfully. Acquire the personal and professional skills needed in order to develop a professional career and/or to succeed as entrepreneurs in Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs).

Indicative content

  • An introduction to entrepreneurship and an analysis of the skills and qualities associated with successful entrepreneurs.
  • Generating successful business ideas.
  • Environmental scanning.
  • Developing a credible business plan that includes evaluating business ideas. Assessing risk and uncertainty; identifying potential customers, markets and market segments; assessing operations, USP and competition; price vs quality and profits.
  • Presenting the business idea.

Year 4 Core Modules

You must study and pass all five core modules

Brief description

Financial accounting in the context of international business and the financial reporting and accounting complications caused by multinational business activities. 

Module content: 

  • International financial reporting and harmonisation: Drivers for international financial reporting; accounting as an international language of business; general financial reporting models; the process of harmonisation and the theory of international disclosure.
  • The concept of valuation in accounting: Income measurement and capital maintenance; Income measurement under the conditions of certainty and uncertainty.
  • Accounting for changing prices: Criticism against historical cost accounting; current purchasing power accounting; replacement cost accounting; realisable value accounting and current value accounting; fair value measurement and IFRS 13.
  • Accounting treatments for Government Grants.
  • Accounting treatments for pensions and foreign currency transactions.

Brief description

Corporate finance issues. Develop the ability to critically evaluate and synthesise issues in the control and decision- making process of multinational corporations.

Indicative content:

  • The international financial environment: Overview of the MNC and the environment in which it operates (Goals of the MNC, international flow of funds, international financial markets).
  • Exchange rates: Factors that affect exchange rates (Determination of exchange rates, links between inflation, exchange rates and interest rates). 
  • Managing exchange rate risk: Functions involved in managing exposure to exchange rate risk (measuring exposure to exchange rate movements, hedging that exposure). 
  • Management of long-term assets and liabilities: How MNCs manage long-term assets and liabilities (information needs, capital budgeting, cost of capital, country risk, long-term financing decisions, international portfolio investment). 
  • MNC portfolio investment: Domestic and international investment in real projects and financial investments.

Brief description

Prepare for graduate recruitment by ensuring you have the professional skills required in the workplace.

Indicative content

  • Analysing the job market: Determining the type of job you would like to move into. Thinking about sectors and finding out what employers want. 
  • Skills audit: Undertaking a skills audit. 
  • Preparing for work: Understanding the trends in the chosen field of employment and employers’ requirements for staff. 
  • Topic specific activity: Options for study of different skills and knowledge.

Brief description

The analytical tools to make sound investment decisions. 

Indicative content

  • The investment environment: The risk-return trade-off and the efficient pricing of financial assets are central to the investments process. The role of financial markets and their degree of efficiency is an important factor to support investors.
  • Fixed-income securities: Debt securities are often called fixed-income securities because they promise either a fixed stream of income or one that is determined according to a specified formula. These securities have the advantage of being relatively easy to understand because the payment formulas are specified in advance and there is no uncertainty about the size and time of their payments.
  • Equity valuation: The price of a stock depends on the dividend and earnings that can be expected from the firm. In analysing a firm’s prospects, it often makes sense to start with the broad economic environment, examining the state of the aggregate economy and even the international economy. This analysis combined with the appropriate equity valuation model provides the guidance to the investor to operate in financial markets.
  • Portfolio theory and practice: Introduction to Risk, Return and the Historical Record. Risk Aversion and Capital Allocation to Risky Assets. Optimal Risky Portfolios.
  • Options, futures and other derivatives: Introduction to Option Markets. Option Valuation. Futures Markets. Futures, Swaps and Risk Management.
  • Behavioural finance and technical analysis: Understanding the behavioural critique. Technical Analysis and Behavioural Finance.

Brief description

Students will be expected to undertake some practical research in response to a current business need of a real company and produce a suitable management report with recommendations.

Indicative content

  • Analysing a problem: Using different analysis techniques such as data flow diagrams, entity relationship modelling and process mapping, examine problems to better understand the current position of the business.
  • Innovation and innovation techniques: Using different creativity and innovation tools to help find solutions to business problems.
  • Innovation for global growth (IGG): Work with multiple organisations - public, private and third sector, on a challenge they currently face. This will provide a scoping opportunity for the problem and a chance to test possible solutions. Prior to this event take part in discussions on professional behaviour and communication.
  • Developing and presenting the solution: Take the solutions identified during IGG and further investigate their suitability. Develop one or more solutions to provide an implementation plan for the organisation.

Year 4 Option Modules

You must study and pass one option modules of your choosing.

Brief description

The essential components of modern corporate finance, equity investment and ethical and professional standards.

Indicative content

  • Capital budgeting: Investment appraisal methods, strengths and weaknesses of these methods, cash flow projections, project analysis and evaluation, sensitivity analysis.
  • Capital structure: MM propositions without taxes and with taxes, agency theory and agency costs, pecking order theory, trade-off theory, market timing theory etc., practical issues in capital structure policy.
  • Working capital management: Inventories management, accounts receivable management, accounts payable management, cash management, treasury management, working capital funding strategies.
  • Corporate governance: Definitions, agency theory, conflict between managers and shareholders, conflict between majority shareholders and minority shareholders, a variety of governance mechanisms, such as ownership structure, board of directors, executive compensation, corporate control market, and shareholder activism etc., corporate governance codes around the world.
  • Portfolio management and cost of capital: Capital allocation line (CAL), capital market line (CML), security market line (SML), the beta coefficient, the market risk premium, and the Sharpe ratio, WACC, CAPM, APT, Fama & French three-factor model.
  • Market efficiency and equity valuation: Weak market efficiency, semi-strong market efficiency, strong market efficiency, behavioural finance, discounted dividend valuation, free cash flow valuation, market-based valuation, residual income valuation, private company valuation, applications and processes of equity valuation.
  • Ethics and professional conduct: Components of the Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct, responsibilities required by the Code and Standards, practices and procedure designed to prevent violations of the Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct, CFA research objectivity standards.

Brief description

The analytical tools to make sound investment decisions. 

Indicative content:

  • The investment environment: The risk-return trade-off and the efficient pricing of financial assets are central to the investments process. The role of financial markets and their degree of efficiency is an important factor to support investors.
  • Fixed-income securities: Debt securities are often called fixed-income securities because they promise either a fixed stream of income or one that is determined according to a specified formula. These securities have the advantage of being relatively easy to understand because the payment formulas are specified in advance and there is no uncertainty about the size and time of their payments.
  • Equity valuation: The price of a stock depends on the dividend and earnings that can be expected from the firm. In analysing a firm’s prospects, it often makes sense to start with the broad economic environment, examining the state of the aggregate economy and even the international economy. This analysis combined with the appropriate equity valuation model provides the guidance to the investor to operate in financial markets.
  • Portfolio theory and practice: Introduction to Risk, Return and the Historical Record. Risk Aversion and Capital Allocation to Risky Assets. Optimal Risky Portfolios.
  • Options, futures and other derivatives: Introduction to Option Markets. Option Valuation. Futures Markets. Futures, Swaps and Risk Management.
  • Behavioural finance and technical analysis: Understanding the behavioural critique. Technical Analysis and Behavioural Finance.

Brief description

Introduction to international trade. A practical guide to sell abroad profitably including the legal regimes applicable.

Indicative content:

  • Introduction to world trade: The economic rationale for international trade, barriers to trade and international markets. World Bank data, current trade developments.
  • Building the foundations for exporting: Are you ready for export? Writing an export Business Plan, prepping for exports.
  • Creating and using online marketing platforms: Online fundamentals, creating a social media and networking presence, marketing your business worldwide.
  • Mapping your export journey: Choosing a product to export, exploring your territory, preparing and adapting your product for the export marketplace.
  • Managing the transactions: Transport, logistics and fulfilment options; pricing and preparing quotations; getting paid.
  • Some policies of the institutions and organisations: For example the Generalised System of Preferences and the incorporation of Development issues into International Trade regulation.
  • The effect on business of the International Regulation: To include the Vienna Sales Convention 1980, with a UK focus, letters of credit, cross border guarantees, international carriage of goods, by land, sea and air.

Brief description

Contemporary accounting, business and management issues and to gain an in-depth understanding of current thinking. 

Indicative content

  • Business and management: Contemporary issues in general management 
  • Human resource management: Contemporary issues in human resource management, organisation theory and structure
  • Marketing: Contemporary issues in marketing  
  • Accounting and finance: Contemporary issues in accounting and finance

Entry Requirements

Please note: All applicants must have passes in English and Maths - National 5 grade C or GCSE grade C/4 or equivalent.  National 5 ESOL is accepted in lieu of National 5 English. National 5 Lifeskill Maths is not accepted in lieu of Maths.

Below are the literate subjects we accept for entry on this course:

One of the following: Business Management; Classical Studies; Economics; English; ESOL; Geography; History; Media Studies; Modern Studies; Philosophy; Politics; Psychology; Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies; Sociology

If there is a subject that does not appear, please contact our Admissions Office (admissions@abertay.ac.uk) who will be able to confirm whether or not it would be considered for entry.

Please visit our Entry from College pages for suitable College courses.

See information about studying and applying to Abertay for International students.

Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
Higher (standard entry) BBBB Literate subject
Higher (minimum entry) We may make you an offer at the minimum entry grades if you meet the criteria. Find out if you're eligible for minimum entry (see below). BBC Literate subject
A-Level CCC Literate subject
Irish Highers B2B2B2B2 or H3H3H3H3 Literate subject
International Baccalaureate 28 Points Literate subject at S5 or H4
BTEC Extended Diploma MMM Business, Hospitality, Enterprise & Entrepreneurship
AHEAD - Successful completion of the relevant stream of our AHEAD programme
SWAP Access BBB Access to (one of the following):- University Study, Community, Education & Humanities, Arts & Social Science, Languages with Business, Languages, Arts & Social Science, Arts & Humanities, Humanities, Humanities (Teaching), Degree
Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
Advanced Higher BBB Accounting and Business Management
A-Level BBB Accounting and Business Studies
BTEC Extended Diploma DDD Business (Accounting)
HNC - Our Entry from College pages list approved HNC courses
Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
HND - Our Entry from College pages list approved HND courses

Non-country specific qualifications

 

International Baccalaureate

28 points including S5 or H4 in one of the required subjects:

Country Specific Requirements

We accept a wide range of qualifications from applicants from over the world. Select your country from the below options.