Sport and Exercise

Abertay's Sport and Exercise degree lets you study a diverse range of topics – from sport psychology and coaching, to community development and service provision.

Course detail

Start Date

September

Duration

4 years (full-time)

Award Title

BSc (Hons)

UCAS Code

C600

Why study Abertay's BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise?

Dive in to a rich pool of diverse sport and exercise topics – from scientific support, coaching and service provision to duty of care and community development, this programme has been designed to reflect an ever-evolving employment market.  

Gain a deeper understanding of the sciences that underpin sport, and discover how the body responds to sport by exploring topics including physiology, psychology and biomechanics, as well as social policy and sport development. 

You can choose from a range of study programmes that address the physiology and psychology of performance, the science of training practices, the development and social impact of sport and exercise (for example, on health and wellbeing), and the evaluation and analysis of sports performance.

You’ll be given access to our Human Performance Laboratory, Strength and Conditioning Suite and Motion Tracking Laboratory. This means you will be able to use equipment such as the environmental chamber, gas analysis, force platform and 2-D cameras.

This degree provides you with topical information, an ability to translate theory to practice, and the opportunity to gain relevant employment experience within the industry, while still providing you with the flexibility to follow your own interests. 

This course regularly scores over 90% for Overall Student Satisfaction in the National Student Survey, and rated an impressive 96% in 2020

Abertay is widely regarded as THE place to come for high quality teaching. But don't take our word for it:

  • Sunday Times UK University of the Year 2020 for Teaching Quality.
  • Guardian University Guide 2020 Top 10 in the UK for Student Satisfaction with TeachingCourse and Feedback.
  • National Student Survey 2020 Top 10 UK Universities for Student Satisfaction.

Always-On Online Open Day

We aim to immerse you in student life here at Abertay and give you a true feel for our courses and our amazing academic community.

Experience our Always-On Open Day anytime for a mix of:

  • Subject and course presentations and videos.

  • Campus tours, info on applying, funding, student support and accommodation.

  • What the city of Dundee is like to live in.

Take time to soak it all in.

SEE ONLINE OPEN DAY

 

An Abertay Student on a yellow coloured background

How the Course Works

Learning and Assessment

The degree combines lectures, small group work, and practical activities. You also undertake work placements to reinforce the link between theory and practice.

You’ll be encouraged to evaluate information and challenge commonly held ideas about sport and exercise, as well as being invited to research your own areas of interest and expertise.

Assessment uses a combination of examination and coursework to help you develop a variety of intellectual and practical skills, such as being able to put forward a position based on evidence, or being able to discuss and promote ideas within a group.

Entry Requirements

Please note: All applicants must have a pass Maths - National 5 grade C or GCSE grade C/4.  National 5 Lifeskill Maths not accepted in lieu of Maths.

Please visit our Entry from College pages for suitable College courses.

Republic of Ireland applicants, click on the UK tabs and scroll down to find your Entry Requirements.

See information about studying and applying to Abertay for International students.

Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
Higher (standard entry) ABBB To include at least one of the following: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, PE‌ and Maths
Higher (minimum entry) We may make you an offer at the minimum entry grades if you meet the criteria. Find out if you're eligible for minimum entry (see below). BBC To include Biology or Chemistry or Physics or PE or Maths at B
A-Level BCC To include at least one of the following: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, PE‌ and Maths
Irish Highers H2H3H3H3 To include at least one of the following: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, PE‌ and Maths
International Baccalaureate 29 Points To include at least one of the following: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, PE‌ and Maths
BTEC Extended Diploma DMM Sport, Sport and Exercise Sciences
AHEAD Successful completion of the relevant stream of our AHEAD programme
SWAP Access ABB Access to: Life Sciences, Health & Life Sciences, Sciences, Biological Sciences, Biological & Biomedical Sciences, University Study (to include all 4 Human Biology units)
Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
Advanced Higher ABB To include PE and Biology or Chemistry or Physics
A-Level ABB To include PE and Biology or Chemistry or Physics
BTEC Extended Diploma D*DD Sport or Sport & Exercise Sciences
HNC/HND Our Entry from College pages list approved HNC/HND courses
Qualification Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
HND Our Entry from College pages list approved HND courses

Not sure if you're eligible for entry?

If you have the potential and motivation to study at university, regardless of your background or personal circumstances, we welcome your application.

We understand some people have faced extra challenges before applying to university, which is why we consider the background in which your academic grades have been achieved when making an offer.

If you expect to receive passes in three Scottish Highers (grades A-C) and have either ...

  • been in care
  • participated in a targeted aspiration-raising programme such as LIFT OFF, LEAPS, FOCUS West, or Aspire North
  • no family background of going to university
  • attended a school or lived in an area where not many people go to university

... we encourage you to submit an application.

Your Journey Starts Here

In the first two years, you’ll follow a core curriculum that provides a basis for more specialised study in the final two years. 

At the end of the second year of study, you’ll choose a route leading to BSc (Hons) in one of the following specific named awards:

  • BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science
  • BSc (Hons) Physical Activity and Health
  • BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise
  • BSc (Hons) Sports Development and Coaching
  • BSc (Hons) Strength and Conditioning

Practical activities and work placements will enable you to contextualise theory to real life applications – including volunteering with the Active Schools programme – and work towards National Governing Body, or industry qualifications.

Male using an exercise bike

About Your Modules

All modules shown are indicative and reflect course content for the current academic year. Modules are reviewed annually and may be subject to change. If you receive an offer to study with us we will send you a Programme document  that sets out exactly which modules you can expect to take as part of your Abertay University degree programme. Please see Terms and Conditions for more information.

Modules

Year 1 Core Modules

You must study and pass all four core modules​

Brief description

The key social issues in sport and exercise contexts.

Indicative content:

  • Recognising and defining the disciplines within social science: The major disciplines within social science in the context of sport and exercise (e.g., sociology of sport, sport development, sport history).
  • Discrimination in sport: Sources of discrimination in sport and exercise contexts (e.g., gender, class, ethnicity, LGBTI).
  • Sport Political Ideology: How political systems impact upon and use sport.
  • Ethics and sport: Moral and ethical issues in sport and exercise. This context provides a unique environment for moral and ethical issues.
  • Qualitative methodologies: Qualitative research and how this type of research has developed our understanding of sport and exercise.

Brief description

Skeletal and muscular anatomy and the fundamentals of biomechanics applied within a physical activity and health perspective.

Indicative content:

  • Anatomy: The structure and function of healthy bones, joints, tendons and ligaments. Identify major muscle groups and the relationship between muscles (i.e. agonist, antagonist, synergist and fixator).
  • Kinesiology: The normal patterns of movements available at peripheral joints within healthy individuals. Content will include axes of rotation and lever systems within the human body.
  • Kinematics: Basic linear biomechanical principles regarding the description of motion including, vectors, displacement, velocity and acceleration and the ability to accurately calculate these.
  • Kinetics: Newton’s laws of motion, forces, movement of mass, momentum and impulse and the moment of inertia.
  • Analysis of human movement: Biomechanical measures of human movement, including stability and balance within a healthy population. Additionally methods of accurate recording using 2D motion analysis.

Brief description

Introduction to physiology.

Indicative content:

  • Introduction to systems and cells: Organisation of the human body, structure and function of cells.
  • Nervous system and muscle contraction: Basic structure of the nervous system. This will include an introduction to motor and sensory nerves, skeletal muscle structure, muscle fibre types, motor units and muscle excitation and contraction.
  • Bioenergetics and metabolism: Use of carbohydrates and fats as fuels to provide energy at rest and during exercise. Influence of selected hormones on metabolism and fuel use.
  • Cardiovascular system: Anatomy and basic physiology of the cardiovascular system including the structure of the heart and blood vessels. An introduction to the electrical activity of the heart.

Brief description

The determinants and consequences of physical activity as well as interventions to increase participation and decrease sedentary behaviours.

Indicative content:

  • Psychological determinants of exercise: Exercise motivation; self−competencies; social physique anxiety; attitudes and beliefs about health.
  • Psychological outcomes of exercise: Mechanisms and hypotheses; self−esteem; mood enhancement through activity; harmful psychological effects of exercise.
  • Models of health behaviour: Health belief model, Attitudinal−based theories, Self− efficacy and competence−based theories, Self− determination, transtheoretical model.
  • Physical activity promotion: Individual/group and community interventions.

Year 1 Option Modules

You must study and pass one option module of your choosing

Brief description

The major practical and theoretical principles that underpin leadership roles in physical activity and sport. 

Module content:

  • Role: The concept of leadership in sport and physical activity, and how we define these roles. The various contexts in which they operate and the issues of role ambiguity and role conflict.
  • Approach: How the attitude held by an individual acts as the guiding principle for the training and development of their participants. Identify your own leadership philosophy/style and the strengths/weaknesses of this.
  • Planning training sessions: The key stages in the planning of a sport/exercise sessions. The importance of systematic, integrated and serial sessions and the underpinning need to consider the context and participants.
  • Practical instruction: Engage in leading sessions as both a coach/instructor and as a participant. Work in a range of contexts and attempt to overcome different limitations within them.
  • Evaluation: Identify the success/failure of training sessions, the ongoing implications of this, and the limitations of the evaluation process itself.

Years 1 and 2 Elective Modules

You must study and pass one elective module of your choosing

Brief description

Introduction of the concept of smart cities - hard infrastructure, social capital including local skills and community institutions, and digital technologies to fuel sustainable economic development and provide an attractive environment for all.

Module content:

  • Social impacts
    There is an overall need for theoretical and methodological plurality in how we assess the impact and value of future cities in terms for individual and societal well−being. Gaps in our understanding relate to the complex ways individuals and groups engage with built and natural settings, the cultural goods and consequent benefits that may arise and the inequalities associated with these cultural benefits.

 

  • Security

Different types of cyber-attacks that could be launched against a Smart City. Impact of cyber-attacks. Approaches to securing the smart grid and critical infrastructure, i.e. improving cyber resilience.

 

  • Sustainable urban food production

Includes the long established allotments movement to large scale projects based on sustainability throughout the food chain. Urban food production includes the long established allotments movement. The demand for urban growing also responds to the densification and intensification of living areas, due to population rise, migration and demographic aging with lower housing and ‘garden’ space standards placing greater importance on collective production.

 

  • Energy, waste and water

At present, water and wastewater facilities are often the largest and most energy intensive responsibilities owned and operated by local governments, representing up to 35% of municipal energy use. Future cities will need to utilise more sustainable methods of water and waste water management and renewable energy production.

 

  • Digital technologies

Digital technologies will play a major role in creating sustainable and resilient cities offering a vehicle for more inclusive decision−making process and promoting dialog amongst architects, urban planners, the public and technologists.

Brief description

Develop a range of skills, knowledge and techniques within the natural, technological and social sciences relevant to the study of environmental sustainability and life in the twenty-first century. Understand the critical issues that confront humanity and begin to discern appropriate responses

Module content:

  • The Challenge of Sustainable Development
    Problems associated with life in the 21st Century and the relationship to scientific provisionalism and uncertainty are discussed.
     
  • The Genesis of Sustainable Development Concept
    Developments associated with the Club of Rome are outlined while Limits to Growth and the Tragedy of the Commons are discussed.
     
  • Evolution of Sustainable Development
    The Reo Summit and Suitability, and Policy Developments thereof will be discussed.
     
  • Scientific Inquiry and Sustainable Development
    We will look at controversial issues like climate change, oil peak, and food production and the role of science in helping delimit them as problematic will be outlined.
     
  • Mainstreaming Sustainability
    Sustainability and Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience, as individual and social concerns, will be evaluated. And their role in transformation will be discussed.
     
  • Communicating Sustainability
    Human well-being, Environmental Justice, Environmental Policy and the practicalities of Sustainability in Scotland are discussed.
     
  • Sustainable Development in Practice
    Community Empowerment associated with Land Reform. Energy Production and Food Production in Tayside are looked at.
     
  • Ethics and Sustainability Policy
    Active citizenship and Globalisation are discussed.
     
  • Innovating Locally, Transforming Globally
    Transformations that are required to embrace Sustainability will be analysed and discussed.
     
  • Active Relationship for Sustainable Futures
    Thinking Globally, acting locally.

Brief description

How lifestyle can effect physical and mental well-being. Reflect on your own lifestyle choices and how to incorporate good health behaviours into your life.

Module content:

  • Sleep and stress
    The impact of sleep and stress on health and performance. Completion of sleep diaries and questionnaires related to sleep patterns and stress.
     
  • Physical activity
    Current physical activity recommendations, components of physical fitness.
     
  • Physical inactivity
    Understanding why people are inactive. The link between physical inactivity, obesity and type 2 diabetes.
     
  • Physical activity and mental well-being
    The effects of physical activity on mental well-being.
     
  • The effect of carbohydrate consumption and exercise on blood glucose
    Measurement and recording of blood glucose in response to the carbohydrate ingestion and exercise.
     
  • Simple health and fitness testing
    Measurement and recording of data. Tests will include blood pressure, strength, endurance and flexibility. Data will be compared with normative values for these tests.

Brief description

Develop critical thinking skills that form the basis for progression across the academic disciplines of the university. Learn how to recognise, construct, evaluate, criticise and defend different forms of argument.

Module content:

  • Potential 'Timeless' Debates
    Debates delivered by internal and external experts on: e.g. existence of God; privacy and civil society; private property; money as source of 'evil'; nature/nurture; free speech; pornography; capital punishment; prostitution; animal experimentation; meaning of justice; abortion; affirmative action; just war; trade union power; good life/good political community; human nature; monarchy; value of democracy; meaning of equality; citizenship rights etc.
     
  • Potential 'Timely' Debates
    Debates delivered by internal and external experts on: eg, Scottish independence, academic freedom; drug legalisation; drug use in sport; immigration; free health care; war on terror; EU membership; euthanasia; progressive taxation; race and gender discrimination; gay marriage; human rights; politics/sport; global warming; internet censorship; nuclear power; education league tables; nuclear weapons; GM agriculture; religion; cloning; fair trade; value of contemporary culture; etc.
     
  • Critical Thinking Seminars
    Follow-up discursive discipline specific seminar sessions led by teaching staff on topics covered in formal debates. Students are tutored to identify types of argument presented, evaluate perspectives and to reflect upon their own reasoning processes and value assumptions. The debates and seminars facilitate a foundation for the acquisition of graduate attributes.
     
  • WEB CT Wiki Discussion Forum
    Students will be required to work in small groups to write a short 800 word indicative "Thinking Summary" online Wiki of the arguments presented in each debate. These summaries will be constructed by each designated Thinking Group of three students using the Wiki facility on Blackboard which will facilitate further discussion on the moderated WEB CT discussion forum.

Brief description

The social, managerial, economic, political, and technical challenges and opportunities associated with emerging renewable energy innovation, production, supply and consumption.

Module content:

  • Renewable Energy Nontechnical Challenges and Opportunities
    Social and political challenges and opportunities of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Economic and environmental challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Strategic and managerial challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption.
     
  • Renewable Energy Technological challenges and opportunities
    Geotechnical, Geophysical and Hydrographic information; Knowledge of sources of hydrographic information and interpretation of published charts. Forces on structures; Appreciation of the various forces acting on marine structures. Technical limitations and challenges of energy distribution systems and energy storage. Current technological development trend, collaborative innovation in renewable energy.

Brief description

An understanding of the concepts of tolerance, and the importance of making sound ethical decisions. Develop the qualities, characteristics and skills to meet the aspiration for Abertay graduates to become global and active citizens. 

Module content:

  • Introduction to equality and ethics legislation equality and ethics legislation.
     
  • Diversity competence; moral/ethical reasoning Inclusiveness, equal opportunities, positive action, Reasonable Adjustment, moral/ethical reasoning.
     
  • Attributes for the workplace and for global citizenship.
     
  • Reflective Practice Application of models of reflective practice.
     
  • Contemporary Issues.

Brief description

Learn how to adjust language to suit context. Analyse a range of linguistic issues, including “proper English”, how language can be used to create moral panics, and the ethics of communication.

Module content:

• Good English": the role of standardisation, dialect and idiolect − how we choose language to reflect our identities and our role in a speech or discourse community.

• Language and influence: how the media constructs narratives to persuade or inform the audience (and how to tell the difference).

• Creating a narrative across genres: the conventions, freedoms and limitations of different forms; using these forms in new ways.

• Narrative changes over time: how authors reinvent old stories to reflect current concerns.

• Technical writing: the use and manipulation of data; hearing the author's voice; critiquing "bad science".

• The ethics of communication: (electronic) media and ownership, attribution and theft.

Brief description

“Personal” digital safety to make computer security fun, practical and eye-opening.  Learn the base knowledge that will continue to be relevant to future generations of devices.

Module content:

  • Current state of computer security.

An overview including legal aspects.
 

  • Cyber-attacks, vulnerabilities and threats:

Malware, Network attacks (denial of service, packet sniffing etc.), bots and rootkits. How the bad guys can obtain your password.
 

  • Information Leakage, recovery and forensics recovering deleted or corrupted files.

What your browser knows about you. Web browser forensics.
 

  • Securing networks, accounts and devices

Defence against malware, honeypots, Secure protocols, intrusion detection, Password security, Mobile device security
 

  • Human aspects of cyber security

The Psychology of Hackers, Social Engineering, identity theft, Usability vs security.
 

  • Breaking the code

An introduction to cryptography, Encryption and Decryption, public and private keys, the key exchange problem.
 

  • History of Cryptography

The Caesar cipher, polyalphabetic ciphers, the Playfair cipher, the role of Enigma and the Bletchley Park cryptographers in WWII
 

  • Computers and Crypto Diffie-Hellman and RSA encryption

Phil Zimmerman and “Pretty Good Protection". Quantum Cryptography – Provably unbreakable information hiding. Mathematical Underpinnings – Large prime numbers and why they matter.
 

  • Steganography

A picture's worth a thousand words when you're hiding the wood in the trees.
 

  • The Law, Society and Cryptography

Why you can be imprisoned for forgetting your password. The Civil Liberties Arguments for and against strong-crypto. International perspectives on information hiding, information freedom, the right to privacy and the conflicts between these. Are unbreakable cyphers an unqualified “good thing”?

Brief description

Develop perspectives on the key challenges faced by humankind such as environmental change, pollution, food security, energy provision, conflicts, terrorism, emerging diseases, and changing demographics. Understand the overwhelming complexity of the problems and the need for interdisciplinary approaches to create solutions.

Module content:

  • Interdisciplinary research
    Introductory lectures will discuss the definitions, methods, benefits, challenges, and drawbacks of disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches and the role of public policy influencing research
     
  • Global Challenges
    Challenges will be introduced from different disciplines. Indicative examples include: − Climate Change: causes and impact – Serious Games: science and application of visualization and games − Global Security − Valuing ecosystems: balancing policy, economics and environment − Contemporary challenges to healthy living − Food security: global threats and local needs – Energy Poverty – Space Travel.

Brief description

Design an activity to communicate and present scientific principles to primary school children. Learn about working as a group and how to communicate complex ideas.

Module content:

  • Developing a Science Communication activity
    Target audience, sources of information to identify suitable activities (CfE documentation etc.), health and safety, issues around working with specific groups, accessibility, ethics, costing and sustainability.
     
  • The landscape of engagement and current practice
    Types of public engagement activities, target audiences, funding, role of learned societies universities and other bodies. Public engagement in Dundee and Tayside.

Brief description

Work in a team to develop game design concepts for serious applications. Gain the knowledge, processes and techniques of game design and study examples of serious games developed to benefit society.

Module content:

•    Overview of Games
A brief history of games, game art and gamification.

•    Games for change
Understanding how games can benefit society.

•    Game mechanics
Deconstructing core components of popular game genres.

•    Gameplay constructs
What is gameplay and how is this broken down and communicated within the game design.

•    The game design process
Conceptualisation, iteration, phases of workflow.

•    Game design theory and practice
Identifying the elements within effective design and how they are implemented.

•    Documenting the design interactive
Oriented design, technical design, capturing requirements.

•    Business models
Exploring methods that can be used to generate revenue within the game design.

Brief description

Develop the knowledge and awareness required to make good career decisions and the skills and confidence to successfully navigate each stage of the recruitment process for graduate jobs.

Module content:

  • Developing self-awareness
    Profiling of personal strengths, values and priorities in relation to career choice.
     
  • Developing opportunity awareness
    Generating career ideas based on your personal profile; Exploring the range of graduate opportunities within job sectors of interest; Reviewing occupations that are directly related to your own subject discipline.
     
  • Developing a career action plan
    Matching your personal profile with best fit opportunities in the job market; Creating a timeline of actions to improve your prospects of meeting your aim.
     
  • Developing job seeking skills
    Sourcing suitable job opportunities - both advertised and unadvertised; Creating a professional image online; Identifying the skills and qualities employers look for in graduates; Learning how to produce targeted applications for specific job roles; Practising the presentation of your strengths and motivations in face to face selection activities.

Brief description

Learn about natural disaster such as landslides and flooding, structural disasters such as the Tay Rail Bridge and the system of critical infrastructure (such as road, rail, air and shipping transport networks, power grid, gas and water networks, health system) that constitute the backbone of modern societies.

Module content:

  • Overview of the scope and the content of concept of critical infrastructure failure during natural disasters and resilience against such failures
    the consequences of geophysical, hydrological and meteorological disasters on critical infrastructure and critical infrastructure protection capabilities against natural disasters. Interdependencies of critical infrastructures during large disasters, presents a brief review of current research being done in this field, and presents a methodology to address interdependencies.
     
  • The identification of the vulnerabilities of the critical systems
    The critical systems upon which modern society, economy, and polity depend. The identification of the vulnerabilities of these systems threats that might exploit these vulnerabilities. The effort to develop techniques to mitigate these vulnerabilities through improved design.
     
  • Flooding in Scotland
    general overview of fluvial, pluvial and coastal flooding, the structural, economic and societal impact and responses to flooding. Resources will include historical examples, current policies and information (including SEPA flood maps). Case study (with virtual/actual field visit?) the Perth Floods of 1990 and 1993 and the Perth flood defence scheme*
     
  • Landslide origins, types and mitigations
    General overview what landslides are, why they happen and what can be done to prevent them.
     
  • Structural Failure
    e.g. why did the Tay Bridge fails and what did the failure mean for the Forth Rail Bridge
     
  • Reports and investigations
    the role of reports in accident and disaster investigations in creating informative reports; case studies of accidents, disasters, learning from history, learning from case studies, learning from common law
     
  • Case studies
    Power System Blackouts, Smart Grids and self-healing systems. Nuclear Plant Emergency How Would the Public Respond?

Brief description

Introduction to the skills and knowledge needed to launch a small business successfully. This module will define and help you acquire the personal and professional skills needed to develop a professional career and/or to succeed as entrepreneurs in Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs).

Module content:

  • Understanding entrepreneurship.
     
  • Generating successful business ideas.
     
  • Environmental scanning.
     
  • Developing a credible business plan that includes evaluating business ideas.
     
  • Presenting the business idea.

Brief description

An understanding of some of the processes involved in food production. Discuss common misconceptions and ideas which present the food and nutritional industries in a bad light.

Module content:

  • Student led investigations
    Student led investigations of the different sectors within the food and drink industry including: prebiotics – and the controversy surrounding the term; if barbequing is a healthy cooking method; and exposing the celebrity chef - common Myths about cooking
     
  • Consumerism
    Does the food industry listen to us? -Understanding consumer and sensory science to better understand why you buy the products you buy. - How food / public health is reported by the media? - The French paradox / Mediterranean diet.
     
  • Future of food
    Ethical food production and the future of foods, and, what’s waste got to do with it?
     
  • Debunking myths
    Debunking food myths, more science than science fiction in our food today, like the science behind getting sauce out of a bottle and what to drink – Whisky or Beer?
     
  • Facts from fiction
    Finding facts from fiction, investigating the three second rule – should I eat things that have fallen on the floor? What’s so super about super-foods? Fat or sugar: Which is worse?

Brief description

Learn how we approach and understand mental health, from historic, social, therapeutic, and individual perspectives. Explore questions such as ‘what is madness?’, ‘how does society position people with mental illness?’, and ‘how do we best respond to challenges to our mental health?’

Module content:

  • Historical and cultural perspective on mental illness
    How do we ‘think’ about mental health, and mental ill health?
     
  • Diagnosis and the anti-psychiatry movement
    Who holds the power to decide what is normal in terms of psychological well-being and behaviour?
     
  • Gender, culture and mental health
    How gendered cultural expectations and representations influence how we respond to mental health issues.
     
  • Media representations
    The impact of film and literature on attitudes and understandings of mental health.
     
  • Resilience, treatment and recovery
    Common mental health problems in the UK, treatment and management, and frameworks for enhancing well-being and resilience.

Brief description

An introduction to the wide range of disciplines in forensic investigation. Learn how crimes are investigated from the moment of reporting through to the presentation of the evidence in court. A hypothetical case study provides an over-arching framework in which to explore the critical aspects of forensic investigations. It involves not only physical and electronic evidence, but also statements from witnesses, suspects and victims which requires cross discipline collaboration of professionals.

Module content:

  • Crime Scene Investigation
    How a crime scene is examined in the context of incomplete contextual information and to avoid loss or contamination of evidence and the maximising of the value of evidential material.
     
  • Media Involvement
    Positive and negative effects of the media/public interest in the crime.
     
  • Forensic Biology
    Examination and evidential value of body fluids, DNA, hairs and fibres.
     
  • Forensic Chemistry
    Analysis for drugs, toxicological analysis, firearms, explosives, and trace evidence.
     
  • Digital Sources
    Evidence from CCT, mobile phones, computer hardware, on−line behaviour.
     
  • Forensic Reasoning and Practice
    An introduction to forensic problem solving, thinking styles, case assessment and interpretation.
     
  • Psychology of Witnesses and Suspects
    False confessions, offender profiling, effects and avoidance of cognitive bias in forensic science through process design.

Brief description

The overall purpose of this module is to develop students’ understanding of the major practical and theoretical principles that underpin leadership roles in physical activity and sport. This will be achieved by explicitly addressing students’ knowledge of the variety of roles that are undertaken by leaders in physical activity and sport and the skills needed to work across a wide variety of physical activity contexts. Students will have the opportunity to engage in both theoretical underpinnings of practice and in practical settings to develop their own leadership skills.

Indicative content:

  • Role: Students will discuss the concept of leadership in sport and physical activity, and how we define these roles. They will look at the various contexts in which they operate and consider the issues of role ambiguity and role conflict.

  • Approach: Students will be asked to consider the how the attitude held by an individual acts as the guiding principle for the training and development of their participants. Students will identify their own leadership philosophy/style and the strengths/weaknesses of this.

  • Planning trainings sessions: Students will learn the key stages in the planning of a sport/exercise sessions. They will focus on the importance of systematic, integrated and serial sessions and the underpinning need to consider the context and participants

  • Practical instruction: Students will be expected to engage in leading sessions as both a coach/instructor and as a participant. They will be work in a range of contexts and attempt to overcome different limitations within these contexts.

  • Evaluation: Students will need to identify the success/failure of training sessions, the ongoing implications of this, and the limitations of the evaluation process itself.

Year 2 Core Modules

You must study and pass all five core module.

Brief description

The core concepts of sport and exercise psychology and how these apply to real world environments. 

Indicative content:

  • Definition of the field of sport and exercise psychology
  • Fundamentals of sport and exercise psychology: The role of personality and sport; models of achievement motivation and competitiveness; motivational climates; stress, arousal, anxiety and other emotional processes.
  • Group processes: Group and team dynamics, group cohesion, communication, leadership.
  • An introduction to psychological skills

Brief description

This module is to provide the student with an understanding of the core concepts of sport and exercise physiology and the application to sport and exercise.

Indicative content:

  • Fundamentals of bioenergetics: The core concepts of energy production during exercise, examining the interaction of the different energy systems during exercise and how these change with inactivity.
  • Regulation of energy systems: Hormonal and neural factors that influence the availability and regulation of fuel metabolism at rest and during exercise in health and disease.
  • Cardiovascular and respiratory system in sport and exercise: The determinants of exercising muscle oxygenation and its regulation by the cardiovascular and respiratory system, the regulation of arterial blood pressure during exercise and the interaction between oxygenation and arterial blood pressure.
  • Fatigue: Neuromuscular and skeletal muscle fatigue and the potential mechanisms resulting in the development of fatigue.
  • Physiological testing: The physiological tests that are used routinely for health assessment and their limitations. How to carry out different physiological tests and analyse and interpret the results.

Brief description

A work placement opportunity to lead, develop and/or support the delivery of physical activity sessions to school pupils in Dundee. Engage with a range of employers from the Sport and Fitness industry to gain insight into the requirements of particular roles. These experiences should enable you to develop a career plan for future employment.

Indicative content:

  • Planning and delivering activity sessions: Session planning; managing time/resources/people; working within a team; Active Schools/Positive Coaching Scotland training; managing challenging behaviour; developing diversity competence; Growth Mindset; contemporary issues in the sport and fitness industry.
  • Personal Development Planning (PDP): Completing SWOT analyses; personal objective/goal setting; action planning; electronic PDPs.
  • Reflective practice: Application of models of reflective practice; guided reflection to highlight learning; making theory− practice links; career planning.
  • Articulating skill development: Using electronic platforms and oral media to promote knowledge and skills to external audiences in the context of employability; careers/external speaker workshops.

Brief description

Biomechanical concepts applied within a sport health and performance perspective. Analyse movement using various biomechanical laboratory techniques including those relating to movement analysis, reaction forces and the application of Newton's Laws.

Indicative content:

  • Biomechanical concepts in sport and exercise: How motion, forces, movement of mass, and acceleration can be applied in a sport, health and exercise context.
  • Specialist equipment use (injury): The use of specialist equipment, such as force platforms, 2D motion analysis, contact mats, and electromyography to assess injury risk.
  • Specialist equipment use (performance): The use of specialist equipment, such as force platforms, 2D motion analysis, contact mats, and electromyography to improve performance.

Brief description

The key social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Indicative content:

  • Interdisciplinary nature of social sciences: The ways in which various disciplines within social science help us to understand and explain issues relating to physical activity and health (e.g., sociology of sport, sociology of health and illness, epidemiology, sport development, sport history).
  • Critically engage with the notion of ‘healthy’ lifestyles: Question the construction of ‘healthy’ living.
  • Research topics within the social sciences: Make connections between the approaches/findings of physical activity and health research and how these inform debates around agency− structure.
  • Political Ideology and Social Inequalities: Question the ways in which health and physical activity participation are framed by political ideologies and consider how and why this influences social inequalities.
  • Qualitative methodologies: Qualitative research and how it has developed our understanding of physical activity and health.

Years 1 and 2 Elective Modules

You must study and pass one elective module of your choosing

Brief description

Introduction of the concept of smart cities - hard infrastructure, social capital including local skills and community institutions, and digital technologies to fuel sustainable economic development and provide an attractive environment for all.

Module content:

  • Social impacts
    There is an overall need for theoretical and methodological plurality in how we assess the impact and value of future cities in terms for individual and societal well−being. Gaps in our understanding relate to the complex ways individuals and groups engage with built and natural settings, the cultural goods and consequent benefits that may arise and the inequalities associated with these cultural benefits.
     
  • Security

Different types of cyber-attacks that could be launched against a Smart City. Impact of cyber-attacks. Approaches to securing the smart grid and critical infrastructure, i.e. improving cyber resilience.

 

  • Sustainable urban food production

Includes the long established allotments movement to large scale projects based on sustainability throughout the food chain. Urban food production includes the long established allotments movement. The demand for urban growing also responds to the densification and intensification of living areas, due to population rise, migration and demographic aging with lower housing and ‘garden’ space standards placing greater importance on collective production.

 

  • Energy, waste and water

At present, water and wastewater facilities are often the largest and most energy intensive responsibilities owned and operated by local governments, representing up to 35% of municipal energy use. Future cities will need to utilise more sustainable methods of water and waste water management and renewable energy production.

 

  • Digital technologies

Digital technologies will play a major role in creating sustainable and resilient cities offering a vehicle for more inclusive decision−making process and promoting dialog amongst architects, urban planners, the public and technologists.

Brief description

Develop a range of skills, knowledge and techniques within the natural, technological and social sciences relevant to the study of environmental sustainability and life in the twenty-first century. Understand the critical issues that confront humanity and begin to discern appropriate responses.

Module content:

  • The Challenge of Sustainable Development
    Problems associated with life in the 21st Century and the relationship to scientific provisionalism and uncertainty are discussed.
     
  • The Genesis of Sustainable Development Concept
    Developments associated with the Club of Rome are outlined while Limits to Growth and the Tragedy of the Commons are discussed.
     
  • Evolution of Sustainable Development
    The Reo Summit and Suitability, and Policy Developments thereof will be discussed.
     
  • Scientific Inquiry and Sustainable Development
    We will look at controversial issues like climate change, oil peak, and food production and the role of science in helping delimit them as problematic will be outlined.
     
  • Mainstreaming Sustainability
    Sustainability and Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience, as individual and social concerns, will be evaluated. And their role in transformation will be discussed.
     
  • Communicating Sustainability
    Human well-being, Environmental Justice, Environmental Policy and the practicalities of Sustainability in Scotland are discussed.
     
  • Sustainable Development in Practice
    Community Empowerment associated with Land Reform. Energy Production and Food Production in Tayside are looked at.
     
  • Ethics and Sustainability Policy
    Active citizenship and Globalisation are discussed.
     
  • Innovating Locally, Transforming Globally
    Transformations that are required to embrace Sustainability will be analysed and discussed.
     
  • Active Relationship for Sustainable Futures
    Thinking Globally, acting locally.

Brief description

How lifestyle can affect physical and mental well-being. Reflect on your own lifestyle choices and how to incorporate good health behaviours into your life.

Module content:

  • Sleep and stress
    The impact of sleep and stress on health and performance. Completion of sleep diaries and questionnaires related to sleep patterns and stress.
     
  • Physical activity
    Current physical activity recommendations, components of physical fitness.
     
  • Physical inactivity
    Understanding why people are inactive. The link between physical inactivity, obesity and type 2 diabetes.
     
  • Physical activity and mental well-being
    The effects of physical activity on mental well-being.
     
  • The effect of carbohydrate consumption and exercise on blood glucose
    Measurement and recording of blood glucose in response to the carbohydrate ingestion and exercise.
     
  • Simple health and fitness testing
    Measurement and recording of data. Tests will include blood pressure, strength, endurance and flexibility. Data will be compared with normative values for these tests.

Brief description

Develop critical thinking skills that form the basis for progression across the academic disciplines of the university. Learn how to recognise, construct, evaluate, criticise and defend different forms of argument.

Module content:

  • Potential 'Timeless' Debates
    Debates delivered by internal and external experts on: e.g. existence of God; privacy and civil society; private property; money as source of 'evil'; nature/nurture; free speech; pornography; capital punishment; prostitution; animal experimentation; meaning of justice; abortion; affirmative action; just war; trade union power; good life/good political community; human nature; monarchy; value of democracy; meaning of equality; citizenship rights etc.
     
  • Potential 'Timely' Debates
    Debates delivered by internal and external experts on: eg, Scottish independence, academic freedom; drug legalisation; drug use in sport; immigration; free health care; war on terror; EU membership; euthanasia; progressive taxation; race and gender discrimination; gay marriage; human rights; politics/sport; global warming; internet censorship; nuclear power; education league tables; nuclear weapons; GM agriculture; religion; cloning; fair trade; value of contemporary culture; etc.
     
  • Critical Thinking Seminars
    Follow-up discursive discipline specific seminar sessions led by teaching staff on topics covered in formal debates. Students are tutored to identify types of argument presented, evaluate perspectives and to reflect upon their own reasoning processes and value assumptions. The debates and seminars facilitate a foundation for the acquisition of graduate attributes.
     
  • WEB CT Wiki Discussion Forum
    Students will be required to work in small groups to write a short 800 word indicative "Thinking Summary" online Wiki of the arguments presented in each debate. These summaries will be constructed by each designated Thinking Group of three students using the Wiki facility on Blackboard which will facilitate further discussion on the moderated WEB CT discussion forum.

Brief description

The social, managerial, economic, political, and technical challenges and opportunities associated with emerging renewable energy innovation, production, supply and consumption.

Module content:

  • Renewable Energy Nontechnical Challenges and Opportunities
    Social and political challenges and opportunities of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Economic and environmental challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Strategic and managerial challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption.
     
  • Renewable Energy Technological challenges and opportunities
    Geotechnical, Geophysical and Hydrographic information; Knowledge of sources of hydrographic information and interpretation of published charts. Forces on structures; Appreciation of the various forces acting on marine structures. Technical limitations and challenges of energy distribution systems and energy storage. Current technological development trend, collaborative innovation in renewable energy.

Brief description

An understanding of the concepts of tolerance, and the importance of making sound ethical decisions. Develop the qualities, characteristics and skills to meet the aspiration for Abertay graduates to become global and active citizens. 

Module content:

  • Introduction to equality and ethics legislation equality and ethics legislation.
     
  • Diversity competence; moral/ethical reasoning Inclusiveness, equal opportunities, positive action, Reasonable Adjustment, moral/ethical reasoning.
     
  • Attributes for the workplace and for global citizenship.
     
  • Reflective Practice Application of models of reflective practice.
     
  • Contemporary Issues.

Brief description

Learn how to adjust language to suit context. Analyse a range of linguistic issues, including “proper English”, how language can be used to create moral panics, and the ethics of communication.

Module content:

•    “Good English”
The role of standardisation, dialect and idiolect − how we choose language to reflect our identities and our role in a speech or discourse community.

Language and influence
How the media constructs narratives to persuade or inform the audience (and how to tell the difference).

Creating a narrative across genres
The conventions, freedoms and limitations of different forms; using these forms in new ways.

Narrative changes over time
How authors reinvent old stories to reflect current concerns.

Technical writing
The use and manipulation of data; hearing the author's voice; critiquing "bad science".

The ethics of communication
 (Electronic) media and ownership, attribution and theft.

Brief description

“Personal” digital safety to make computer security fun, practical and eye-opening.  Learn the base knowledge that will continue to be relevant to future generations of devices.

Module content:

  •  Current state of computer security

An overview including legal aspects.

•    Cyber-attacks, vulnerabilities and threats
Malware, Network attacks (denial of service, packet sniffing etc.), bots and rootkits. How the bad guys can obtain your password.

•    Information leakage
Recovery and forensics recovering deleted or corrupted files. What your browser knows about you. Web browser forensics.

•    Securing networks, accounts and devices
Defence against malware, honeypots, Secure protocols, intrusion detection, Password security, Mobile device security.

•    Human aspects of cyber security 
The Psychology of Hackers, Social Engineering, identity theft, Usability vs security.

•    Breaking the code
An introduction to cryptography, Encryption and Decryption, public and private keys, the key exchange problem.

•    History of cryptography 
The Caesar cipher, polyalphabetic ciphers, the Playfair cipher, the role of Enigma and the Bletchley Park cryptographers in WWII.

•    Computers and Crypto Diffie-Hellman and RSA encryption
Phil Zimmerman and “Pretty Good Protection". Quantum Cryptography – Provably unbreakable information hiding. Mathematical Underpinnings – Large prime numbers and why they matter.

•    Steganography
 A picture's worth a thousand words when you're hiding the wood in the trees.

•    The law, society and cryptography 
Why you can be imprisoned for forgetting your password. The Civil Liberties Arguments for and against strong-crypto. International perspectives on information hiding, information freedom, the right to privacy and the conflicts between these. Are unbreakable cyphers an unqualified “good thing”?

Brief description

Develop perspectives on the key challenges faced by humankind such as environmental change, pollution, food security, energy provision, conflicts, terrorism, emerging diseases, and changing demographics. Understand the overwhelming complexity of the problems and the need for interdisciplinary approaches to create solutions.

Module content:

  • Interdisciplinary research
    Introductory lectures will discuss the definitions, methods, benefits, challenges, and drawbacks of disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches and the role of public policy influencing research
     
  • Global Challenges
    Challenges will be introduced from different disciplines. Indicative examples include: − Climate Change: causes and impact – Serious Games: science and application of visualization and games − Global Security − Valuing ecosystems: balancing policy, economics and environment − Contemporary challenges to healthy living − Food security: global threats and local needs – Energy Poverty – Space Travel.

In the module ELE008 Inspire and Discover: Communicating Science you will be working in a team to design an activity to communicate scientific principles to primary school children. For the assessment you will present your activity to local schools. This is exhausting but great fun and you will learn a lot about working as a group as well as how to communicate complex ideas.

Module content:

  • Developing a Science Communication activity
    Target audience, sources of information to identify suitable activities (CfE documentation etc.), health and safety, issues around working with specific groups, accessibility, ethics, costing and sustainability.
     
  • The landscape of engagement and current practice
    Types of public engagement activities, target audiences, funding, role of learned societies universities and other bodies. Public engagement in Dundee and Tayside.

The module will provide the opportunity to work in teams in order to develop game design concepts for serious applications.

Module content:

  • Overview of Games - A brief history of games, game art and gamification.
     
  • Games for Change - Understanding how games can benefit society.
     
  • Game Mechanics - Deconstructing core components of popular game genres.
     
  • Gameplay Constructs - What is gameplay and how is this broken down and communicated within the game design.
     
  • The Game Design Process - Conceptualisation, iteration, phases of workflow.
     
  • Game Design Theory and Practice - Identifying the elements within effective design and how they are implemented.
     
  • Documenting the Design Interactive - oriented design, technical design, capturing requirements.
     
  • Business Models - Exploring methods that can be used to generate revenue within the game design.

The world of work is constantly evolving with new industries, occupations and ways of working emerging all the time. Finding the right career path depends upon having an awareness of your own strengths and motivations and how these fit into the job market. So, is this the time to think about what you have to offer and how you can start to shape your future? If so, this elective will help you to develop the knowledge and awareness required to make good career decisions and the skills and confidence to successfully navigate each stage of the recruitment process for graduate jobs.

Module content:

  • Developing self-awareness
    Profiling of personal strengths, values and priorities in relation to career choice.
     
  • Developing opportunity awareness
    Generating career ideas based on your personal profile; Exploring the range of graduate opportunities within job sectors of interest; Reviewing occupations that are directly related to your own subject discipline.
     
  • Developing a career action plan
    Matching your personal profile with best fit opportunities in the job market; Creating a timeline of actions to improve your prospects of meeting your aim.
     
  • Developing job seeking skills
    Sourcing suitable job opportunities - both advertised and unadvertised; Creating a professional image online; Identifying the skills and qualities employers look for in graduates; Learning how to produce targeted applications for specific job roles; Practising the presentation of your strengths and motivations in face to face selection activities.

This module will utilise the expertise of Abertay in the Natural and Built Environment. The students will learn about natural disaster such as landslides and flooding, structural disasters such as the Tay Rail Bridge and the system of critical infrastructure, part of built environment, such as road, rail, air and shipping transport networks, power grid, gas and water networks, health system, etc., constitutes the backbone of modern societies.

Module content:

  • Overview of the scope and the content of concept of critical infrastructure failure during natural disasters and resilience against such failures
    the consequences of geophysical, hydrological and meteorological disasters on critical infrastructure and critical infrastructure protection capabilities against natural disasters. Interdependencies of critical infrastructures during large disasters, presents a brief review of current research being done in this field, and presents a methodology to address interdependencies.
     
  • The identification of the vulnerabilities of the critical systems
    The critical systems upon which modern society, economy, and polity depend. The identification of the vulnerabilities of these systems threats that might exploit these vulnerabilities. The effort to develop techniques to mitigate these vulnerabilities through improved design.
     
  • Flooding in Scotland
    general overview of fluvial, pluvial and coastal flooding, the structural, economic and societal impact and responses to flooding. Resources will include historical examples, current policies and information (including SEPA flood maps). Case study (with virtual/actual field visit?) the Perth Floods of 1990 and 1993 and the Perth flood defence scheme*
     
  • Landslide origins, types and mitigations
    General overview what landslides are, why they happen and what can be done to prevent them.
     
  • Structural Failure
    e.g. why did the Tay Bridge fails and what did the failure mean for the Forth Rail Bridge
     
  • Reports and investigations
    the role of reports in accident and disaster investigations in creating informative reports; case studies of accidents, disasters, learning from history, learning from case studies, learning from common law
     
  • Case studies
    Power System Blackouts, Smart Grids and self-healing systems. Nuclear Plant Emergency How Would the Public Respond?

This module introduces students the skills and knowledge needed to launch a small business successfully. This module defines and helps students acquire the personal and professional skills needed in order to develop a professional career and/or to succeed as entrepreneurs in Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs).

Module content:

  • Understanding entrepreneurship.
     
  • Generating successful business ideas.
     
  • Environmental scanning.
     
  • Developing a credible business plan that includes evaluating business ideas.
     
  • Presenting the business idea.

This module will give students an understanding of some of the processes involved in food production, and will include debunking myths of the food industry, discussing common misconceptions and exploring ideas which present the food and nutritional industries in a bad light.

Module content:

  • Student led investigations
    Student led investigations of the different sectors within the food and drink industry including: prebiotics – and the controversy surrounding the term; if barbequing is a healthy cooking method; and exposing the celebrity chef - common Myths about cooking
     
  • Consumerism
    Does the food industry listen to us? -Understanding consumer and sensory science to better understand why you buy the products you buy. - How food / public health is reported by the media? - The French paradox / Mediterranean diet.
     
  • Future of food
    Ethical food production and the future of foods, and, what’s waste got to do with it?
     
  • Debunking myths
    Debunking food myths, more science than science fiction in our food today, like the science behind getting sauce out of a bottle and what to drink – Whisky or Beer?
     
  • Facts from fiction
    Finding facts from fiction, investigating the three second rule – should I eat things that have fallen on the floor? What’s so super about super-foods? Fat or sugar: Which is worse?

This elective module will take a pluralistic view on how we approach and understand mental health, from historic, social, therapeutic, and individual perspectives. Students will be posed with questions such as ‘what is madness?’, ‘how does society position people with mental illness?’, and ‘how do we best respond to challenges to our mental health?’

Module content:

  • Historical and cultural perspective on mental illness
    How do we ‘think’ about mental health, and mental ill health?
     
  • Diagnosis and the anti-psychiatry movement
    Who holds the power to decide what is normal in terms of psychological well-being and behaviour?
     
  • Gender, culture and mental health
    How gendered cultural expectations and representations influence how we respond to mental health issues.
     
  • Media representations
    The impact of film and literature on attitudes and understandings of mental health.
     
  • Resilience, treatment and recovery
    Common mental health problems in the UK, treatment and management, and frameworks for enhancing well-being and resilience.

You will learn how crimes are investigated from the moment of reporting through to the presentation of the evidence in court. A hypothetical case study will be used to provide an over−arching framework in which the critical aspects of forensic investigations can be explored. Forensic investigation involves a wide range of disciplines and this module will give an introduction to some of these. A typical investigation involves not only physical and electronic evidence, but also statements from witnesses, suspects and victims. This requires cross discipline collaboration of professionals.

Module content:

  • Crime Scene Investigation
    How a crime scene is examined in the context of incomplete contextual information and to avoid loss or contamination of evidence and the maximising of the value of evidential material.
     
  • Media Involvement
    Positive and negative effects of the media/public interest in the crime.
     
  • Forensic Biology
    Examination and evidential value of body fluids, DNA, hairs and fibres.
     
  • Forensic Chemistry
    Analysis for drugs, toxicological analysis, firearms, explosives, and trace evidence.
     
  • Digital Sources
    Evidence from CCT, mobile phones, computer hardware, on−line behaviour.
     
  • Forensic Reasoning and Practice
    An introduction to forensic problem solving, thinking styles, case assessment and interpretation.
     
  • Psychology of Witnesses and Suspects
    False confessions, offender profiling, effects and avoidance of cognitive bias in forensic science through process design.

Brief description

The module introduces the student to the basic concepts and importance of physical activity for health and wellbeing.

Indicative content:

  • Health correlates and determinants: Introduction to factors that underpin health with a focus on the Dahlgren and Whitehead model.
  • Role and importance of physical activity and health: Introduction to evidence of how physical activity can impact both physical and mental health, and the role and importance of physical activity in contemporary society.
  • Principles of strength and conditioning training for programme design: Introduction to the key concepts and fundamental principles of S&C for the general population. These include how to conduct an appropriate needs analysis and how this process informs the construction and implementation of basic programme designs in the context of health and wellbeing.

Brief description

The key social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Module content:

  • Interdisciplinary nature of social sciences: The ways in which various disciplines within social science help us to understand and explain issues relating to physical activity and health (e.g., sociology of sport, sociology of health and illness, epidemiology, sport development, sport history).
  • Critically engage with the notion of ‘healthy’ lifestyles: Question the construction of ‘healthy’ living.
  • Research topics within the social sciences: Make connections between the approaches/findings of physical activity and health research and how these inform debates around agency− structure.
  • Political Ideology and Social Inequalities: Question the ways in which health and physical activity participation are framed by political ideologies and consider how and why this influences social inequalities.
  • Qualitative methodologies: Qualitative research and how it has developed our understanding of physical activity and health.

Brief description

The module introduces the student to the basic concepts and importance of physical activity for health and wellbeing.

Indicative content:

  • Health correlates and determinants: Introduction to factors that underpin health with a focus on the Dahlgren and Whitehead model.
  • Role and importance of physical activity and health: Introduction to evidence of how physical activity can impact both physical and mental health, and the role and importance of physical activity in contemporary society.
  • Principles of strength and conditioning training for programme design: Introduction to the key concepts and fundamental principles of S&C for the general population. These include how to conduct an appropriate needs analysis and how this process informs the construction and implementation of basic programme designs in the context of health and wellbeing.

Year 3 Core Modules

You must study and pass one core module

Brief description

Develop your ideas about research in sport, exercise, physical activity and health, to better understand and appreciate published research and design your own research project.

Indicative content:

  • The research process: The steps associated with planning and conducting a research process.
  • Formulating and refining research questions: How research ideas are questions are generated and refined.
  • Research methodologies: Various research methodologies (e.g., quantitative, qualitative and mixed−methods). Develop an appreciation of diverse approaches to research in sport, exercise, physical activity and health.
  • Ethical issues: The key ethical issues associated with research in sport, exercise, physical activity and health.
  • Practical skill development: Develop your practical research skills in your chosen discipline area.

Year 3 Option Modules

You must study and pass five option modules of your choosing, three from Group [A] and two from Group [B]. One of them must be a Work Placement module in either Year 3 or Year 4

Brief description

The concepts of coaching and learning and their application to physical activity environments. Move beyond a reductionist view of coaching simply as a systematic procedure and consider and discuss the influence of the social aspects of coaching such as leadership, relationships, and social environments.

Module content:

  • Coaching and learning: The definition and purpose of coaching and learning and what it has to do with teaching and education.
  • The role of the coach: The role of the coach, their purpose and what they try to achieve.  Consider the level of participation, demands placed on coaches by external bodies, and coaches own philosophies towards the instruction of athletes.
  • The coaching process: The key characteristics of coaching. Consider a variety of leadership and relationship models and how they fit into the idea of coaching as a systematic process.
  • Skill development: The principles that underpin the creation on an efficient learning environment. Consider modern theories of skill acquisition and how they relate to effective teaching.
  • Participant groups: Different categorisations of participants and how this impacts on the planning and delivery of the coaching process.

Brief description

The health benefits of physical activity and its potential function in disease prevention, treatment and its role in promoting and maintaining public health.

Module content:

  • Relationship between physical activity and health: Physical activity and disease mortality Morbidity. Historical perspective to present day.
  • Epidemiology of physical activity: Concepts and methods in physical activity Epidemiology Epidemiological measures.
  • Variations in health status: Influence of age, gender, social status, education.
  • Determinants of participation in physical activity: Challenges of engaging people in physical activity.
  • Physical activity recommendations.
  • Place and emphasis of physical activity in health policy: Identified role of physical activity in policies to promote health. Developing role, adoption and promotion of physical activity as a tool to promote health of the nation.
  • Role of physical activity in promoting physical and mental health: Physical and mental health benefits of regular participation in physical activity.

Brief description

A work placement to give you structured and practical experience of your own particular area of the sports industry to enhance your employability. 

Module content:

  • Career pathways: Reflect on your prospective career path. Identify strengths and limitations that you can address to enhance your career progression.
  • Understanding the prospective work environment and organisation: Identify appropriate organisations and opportunities in line with your own continued professional development. Engage in organising an appropriate work placement. Be guided by staff, but lead the process, to develop your ability to find and apply for appropriate employment.
  • Work placement: Undertake the appropriate work placement aligned with your study programme and within a prospective work environment. 

Brief description

Physiological adaptations to exercise from a health related viewpoint. 

Module content:

  • Acute and chronic adaptation to training: How the different physiological systems in the body adapt, both in the short and longer term, to training.
  • Cellular physiology: Some of the cellular adaptations that occur in the body in response to training.
  • Training for heath: How to explain such adaptations through exercise training.
  • Testing for change: A range of suitable tests to measure change in the body from a health related viewpoint.

Brief description

Theoretical and practical knowledge of the fundamentals of strength and conditioning. Learn some of the major underpinning physiological and biomechanical components of human performance, and scientifically justified periodised methods for training to achieve specific goals. 

Module content:

  • Introduction to Strength and Conditioning/Functional Screening: Introduction to key terminology/concepts of Strength and Conditioning and a fundamental understanding of basic functional athlete screening.
  • Introduction to Human Movement: An introduction to human anatomy and the mechanics of human force production (e.g., planes of movement, lever systems).
  • Introduction to Compound lifting: Introduction to the major compound exercises (e.g., Back/Front Squat, Dead−Lift, Bent−Over Row, Bench Press and an introduction to Weightlifting derivatives) with Key technical elements and coaching points associated with each lift.
  • Neuromuscular physiology: Neuromuscular physiology and fibre types.
  • Plyometric training: An introduction to the fundamental principles underpinning Plyometric Training (Stretch−Shortening −Cycle) and an understanding of the key technical coaching points.
  • Sports nutrition: Principles of periodised sports nutrition for S&C training programmes.

Brief description

The core physiological concepts that underpin performance. Gain knowledge of biochemical, cardiovascular and neuromuscular bases for performance and training the body for endurance, team and strength. Use both physiological and biomechanical equipment to explore and collect physiological data in relation to enhancing sports performance outcomes.

Module content:

  • Biochemistry of performance: The core concepts of energy production during sport and exercise, the metabolic processes and the rate limiting steps for performance and the metabolic adaptations to training.
  • Cardiovascular system and performance: Cardiac output and blood flow regulation and cardiovascular adaptation to training.
  • Neuromuscular system and performance: The contractile mechanism, motor unit activation, neuromuscular fatigue and strength, power and speed performance.
  • Doping and performance: The role of doping in elite sport and the physiological adaptations to doping.
  • Training for performance: Different training modalities to improve endurance and anaerobic power and strength. How to plan energy specific programmes.

Brief description

Contemporary issues in sport and exercise, particularly those you are likely to encounter and have to navigate in future employment.

Module content:

  • Social theory: Key aspects of social theory that can be/have been used to explain phenomena in sport and exercise.
  • Inequality and discrimination: The main sources of inequality and discrimination in sport and exercise (e.g., gender, social class, ethnicity, LGBTI).
  • Sport and politics: How various political systems/ ideologies and governing bodies use sport/athletes as a vehicle for social control.
  • Ethics and sport: Moral and ethical issues in sport and exercise (e.g., child protection). Sport and exercise cultures provide a unique environment for moral and ethical issues.

Brief description

Theory and knowledge of sports psychology and aspects of applied sports psychology in the sport and performance context.

Module content:

  • Sports psychology context and practice: Role(s) of the sports psychologists; contexts and different perspectives on the work of a sports psychologist.
  • Planning and developing interventions: The needs analysis process; empowerment; ownership and motivation; assessment of efficacy.
  • Psychological skills training: Theory and research of goal setting, relaxation, energisation, imagery, positive self-talk, pre-performance and performance routines. Performance enhancement contexts; injury prevention and rehabilitation contexts.

Brief description

Sports policy and development in the UK. Gain the knowledge and expertise to evaluate sports development planning and development.

Module content:

  • Introduction to managing sport development: Outline of the courses content and overall rationale.
  • Sport, exercise and physical body culture: Sociological considerations. Making sense of sport in a sport development context.
  • UK Sport: Emergence of sports development; Historical perspectives; Overview of key rationales and values underpinning sport and physical activity. Development of sport or development through sport.
  • Sport and social policy issues: Health and well−being; Social welfare; Sports equality; Young people and education; Urban regeneration; Elite sport.
  • Ideologies underpinning sport: Political Ideologies and the emergence of the New Right and New Labour. Rationales for sport policy initiatives. Policy making process. Models of policy development, planning and implementation.
  • Structures and governance of sport: Structures and governance of sport in the UK context.
  • Strategic management and organisational theory.
  • Marketing and managing sports development.
  • Monitoring and evaluation.

Brief description

The principles of biomechanics and the concept of performance analysis within a sporting context. Using biomechanics to create evidence based intervention strategies to optimise performance.

Module content:

  • Performance analysis: Identify what performance analysis is, observe performance analysis against existing models, apply and assess the efficacy of the different types of performance analysis.
  • Notational analysis: Concepts of notational analysis and methods for team and individual performance. Apply notational analysis methods to a performance setting.
  • Biomechanical concepts associated with performance: Evaluate biomechanical concepts in relation to their application within a sporting/performance concept. Discuss biomechanical factors that contribute to performance or used to optimise performance.
  • Development of intermediate laboratory skills: Develop intermediate laboratory skills in collection of biomechanical data including, 3D assessment of movement, kinetics using force platforms (ground reaction forces and stability).
  • Data processing and analysis: How to effectively process and analyse biomechanical data generated using biomechanical laboratory equipment.

Brief description

Health issues high on the policy agenda and the ways in which participation in physical activity can be and is promoted as a way to address them.

Module content:

  • Defining health: The different ways in which health can and will be defined.
  • Complexity of health promotion in contemporary society: The ways in which health promotion has the potential to both reduce and exacerbate existing social inequalities.
  • Physical activity, its determinants and importance for health promotion: The factors that influence physical activity and its fundamental role in health promotion.
  • Critical engagement with the Obesity ‘Epidemic’: Why obesity is prioritised on the health policy agenda.
  • Health promotion, physical activity and the environment: The environmental factors that influence the promotion of health and physical activity participation.

Brief description

The aetiology, physiology and pathophysiology of obesity and the principal non-communicable diseases.

Module content:

  • Pathophysiology of Obesity: The pathophysiology of obesity and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.
  • Pathophysiology of Type II Diabetes: The pathophysiology of Type II Diabetes and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.
  • Pathophysiology of Cardiovascular: The pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.
  • Pathophysiology of Cancer: The pathophysiology of cancer and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.

Historical, Social and Cultural Aspects of Golf - SPS315

Year 4 Core Modules

You must study and pass one core module

Brief description

Undertake an independent research project in an area of sport, health or physical activity. 

Indicative content:

  • Research project topics: Select your research project topic with staff guidance. You are allocated a supervisory tutor within the Division.
  • Supervisory sessions: These cover the identification of a research question; necessary elements of research design; the approach needed to prepare for and complete the research project; a range of appropriate research methods; appropriate statistical analyses; the structure of the research report; the interpretation of the research results; possible or probable conclusions; and the writing of the report.

Year 4 Option Modules

You must study and pass four option modules, two from Group [A] and two from Group [B]. If you didn’t take the Work Placement module in year 3, you must make the Career Placement module in Group [A] one of your choices.

Brief description

A work placement within a prospective work environment to expand your knowledge and understanding of your subject and its applications within a real-life setting. 

Module content:

  • Career pathways: Reflect on your prospective career path and evaluate your subject-based and transferable skills, identifying strengths and limitations to address to enhance your career progression.
  • Understanding the prospective work environment and organisation: Identify appropriate organisations and opportunities for enhancing you own continued professional development. Engage in organising an appropriate work placement. Be guided by staff but lead the process to find and apply for appropriate employment.
  • Work placement: Undergo an appropriate programme within a prospective work environment to enhance your ability to progress within your selected career pathway.

Brief description

Additional concepts, methods and techniques used in biomechanics. The interdisciplinary nature of sport biomechanics and injury prevention, for example the physiology of fatigue and its application to biomechanical measures.

Module content:

  • Clinical Biomechanics: Gait analysis – changes throughout the lifespan, effects of different footwear (including different cushioning systems and materials), effects of certain diseases and disabilities (including development of prostheses). Injury risk and prevention, including those through impacts, chronic and acute injuries and how these can be linked to health and safety issues.
  • Sport and Exercise Biomechanics: Injury risk, prevention and performance – use of biomechanical aids (including ankle bracing and taping) and their effects on injury incidence and performance. Integrative biomechanical assessment, which will focus on the utilisation and application of biomechanical laboratory skills developed in the third year module.

Brief description

The role of physical activity for special populations. How participation in physical activity has the potential to enhance physical, social and mental health and well−being. The challenges of getting different population groups to engage in physical activity.

Module content:

  • Guidelines: Population physical activity guidelines.
  • Benefits: Physical, social and mental health benefits associated with physical activity.
  • Needs and challenges: Identification of physical activity needs and challenges associated with engaging different groups in physical activity.
  • Participation: Examine participation trends associated with different populations.
  • Exploration of attitudes, beliefs and values: Exploration of attitudes, beliefs and values of different populations regarding physical activity.

Brief description

Pursue a topic of interest, different from any other work either submitted or proposed relevant to your selected pathway. Manage your own learning and set agreed objectives.

Module content:

  • General: Content will depend on individual learning outcomes agreed.

Brief description

One of the most important aspects of sport is the people involved, whether they are taking part, coaching, administering, volunteering or involved in some other capacity. The Sport Duty of Care Review raised questions about whether the wellbeing and welfare of people are being put at the centre of what sport does and delivers. 

Module content:

  • Safeguarding: What more could be done to strengthen sport’s position in relation to the protection of young people and adults at all levels of sport.
  • Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: Specific aspects of duty of care with relevance to equality, diversity and inclusion.
  • Injuries: How the likelihood of injury can be lessened and whether improvements can be made to how sporting injuries are treated in the short and long term.
  • Career transitions: The support people receive as they transition through the sport system, including entering and leaving top-level sport.
  • Mental health: Issues relating to the prevention, identification and management of mental health issues in sportspeople.
  • Education: How sportspeople can be supported to help them balance education with their sporting activities.
  • Representation of the participant’s voice: How the views of sportspeople are considered in decisions affecting them in sport.

Brief description

The professionalism and development of coaching and learning using an evidence-based approach contextualised to real world examples. The issues of professionalism in education and teaching and the different approaches to the development of those responsible for expertise in athletes and other learners.

Module content:

  • The coach as a professional: The expanded roles of a professional coach. The definition of professionalism and the concepts involved in the recognition of coaching as a profession.
  • Coach education: Research−led knowledge and scientific literature and the links it has to the advice and guidance given to those leading coaching and learning. The dissemination of knowledge and the appropriateness of how it is presented.
  • National Governing Bodies: The role NGBs play in supporting coaching and learning. The increasing professionalism of the coaching process, coach education, and scientific support.
  • Volunteer culture: The volunteer culture in sports coaching within the UK and the tensions this can create with the need for legislation, licensing, and education.

Brief description

The way sport can be used to address social issues, some of the problems with this approach, and how these issues can be overcome. A theoretical and practical toolkit for sport development work.

Module content:

  • Community development: A community development approach to sport delivery.
  • Ideologies of sport for development: The political ideologies associated with sport development work.
  • Community Practice: The community practice approach to sporting provision.
  • Sport and urban regeneration: The use of sport as a tool of urban development.
  • Sport for development and peace: The use of sport as a tool of international development.
  • Sport, globalisation and development: Recent changes in societies and their implications for sport and development.
  • Sport, capitalism and inequality: The links between sport, capitalism and inequality.
  • Liberating education and critical consciousness: The notion of liberating education and how it can be applied to sport development work.
  • The politics of development: The political nature of development work and the utility of social movements for development.

Brief description

Theoretical and practical skills for the analysis and interpretation of behaviour change needs and intervention strategies that elicit lifestyle change to promote positive health and wellbeing.

Module content:

  • Theory: Effective communication, Self-awareness, Listening skills.
  • Management skills: Practicalities of management, administration and organisation of client.
  • Behaviour Change: Identify Influences on behaviour. Understanding and assessing behaviour, Individual behaviour and motivation, Determinants and factors that impact on behaviour and motivation.
  • Time management: Aspects of time management. Changing time management. Effective planning.
  • Goal setting: Identifying Goals. Developing Practical Realistic goals. Short long term goals. Achieving goals.
  • Behaviour Change models: Models of behaviour change. Social cognitive theory, relapse prevention model, ecological theories of behaviour, stages of readiness. Moderator’s mediators of change. Behaviour change process.
  • Promoting Adherence: Self efficacy. Social Support. Behaviour change skills, Impact of habitual behaviour, Factors that affect adherence. Overcoming barriers.

Brief description

The core physiological concepts that underpin exercise performance. The external environment and gender and their impacts on performance and training the body for endurance, team and strength.

Module content:

  • Fatigue: The concept of fatigue and how it regulates performance via central and peripheral regulators.
  • Exercise in different temperatures: Systems adaptation − how the different physiological systems adapt to different temperatures.
  • Exercise with different levels of oxygen availability: Systems adaptation − how the different physiological systems adapt to hypoxia and hyperbaria.
  • Overtraining or under-recovery: The role of recovery in ensuring optimal performance.
  • Gender responses: The physiological responses and training adaptations in males and females.

Brief description

Build on the earlier module, Fundamentals of Strength and Conditioning (SPS305). More advanced training methods and theory, with an emphasis on developing long-term training programmes across a diverse range of sports. Units of assessments will be closely aligned with the UKSCA assessment framework.

Module content:

  • Olympic lifting: A progression from the content covered in SPS305, practical competency and technical knowledge of the Clean and Jerk/ Snatch exercises and their variations.
  • Recovery exercise: The mechanisms involved in fatigue and recovery during and after exercise.
  • Assessment of Strength and Power: Issues in strength and power assessment, specific laboratory based and field based protocols, designing testing batteries.
  • Speed, Agility and Plyometric Exercise: Follow on from material covered in SPS305, with emphasis on advanced programme design and interpretation of the scientific literature.
  • Performance analysis: Identifying main physiological and biomechanical requirements of various sports and designing appropriate conditioning interventions.
  • Practical applications: Methods of dealing with a range of practical scenarios in strength and conditioning.
  • Interpretation and dissemination of information: How to interpret scientific data and articles and be able to disseminate findings to a range of populations (e.g coaches, athletes).

Brief description

Build on the foundational theoretical knowledge of sport and exercise psychology and address advanced and contemporary topics for a more in−depth and current perspective of theory and research in the field.

Module content:

  • Motivation and emotion: e.g. self−determination, stress appraisals and coping, burnout, mind-sets.
  • Cognitive sport psychology: e.g. attentional processes, reinvestment theory.
  • Sport, exercise psychology and health: e.g. exercise dependence and addiction; psychology and injury; PA, sedentary behaviours and psychosocial health.
  • Social sport and exercise psychology: e.g. the physical self, communication, coach−athlete relationship.

Fees and funding

The course fees you'll pay and the funding available to you depends on factors such as your nationality, location, personal circumstances and the course you are studying. 

More information

Find out about grants, bursaries, tuition fee loans, maintenance loans and living costs in our undergraduate fees and funding section.

 

Scholarships

We offer a range of scholarships to help support your studies with us.

As well as Abertay scholarships for English, Welsh, Northern Irish and international students, there are a range of corporate and philanthropic scholarships available. Some are course specific, many are not. There are some listed below or you can visit the Undergraduate scholarship pages.

Abertay rUK Scholarship

This is a £4000 award for prospective undergraduate students applying from England, Wales or Northern Ireland.

Abertay International Scholarship

This is an award of up to £12,000 for prospective international undergraduate students.

The Robert Reid Bursary

Two £1,000 awards for students who have overcome challenges to attend university.

Careers

Graduates are typically well placed to work as sports development officers, high-performance coaches, scientific support specialists, outdoor instructors, fitness consultants, lifestyle managers, health promotion specialists, teachers, lecturers, physical activity leaders, or researchers.

The broad range of studies in Years 1 and 2 will give you a solid foundation, providing flexibility for your future career, while the emphasis on employability will allow you to experience the industry and meet key individuals in order to make your mark before even finishing your studies.

Two males watching a football match

Industry Links

You’ll have the opportunity to develop links with various sports industries and work towards achieving awards through this. Work placements that are embedded in the curriculum are an integral part of this process.

Abertay staff have strong research links and many are members of professional societies. There are good links between Division of Sport and Exercise Science staff and industry, and many staff are also current practitioners.

Female working on an exercise bike - two other females spectating and taking notes

Get inspired

Meet some of our Sports graduates and find out what they've gone on to do.

Fraser Murray next to the green and yellow Biella Rugby Club logo wearing a team shirt

Fraser Murray

Fraser is Head of Strength and Conditioning for the First Team of Biella Rugby Club in Italy.

Find out more

A photo of Paul Brand in Manchester United kit holding a trophy

Paul Brand

Paul landed his dream job as Head of First Team Analysis at Manchester United.

Find out more

A picture of Debbi McCullock in her Spartans coaching outfit.

Debbi McCulloch

Debbi rose up from groundsman to Business and Operations Manager at Spartans Academy.

Find out more

Unistats

Unistats collates comparable information in areas students have identified as important in making decisions about what and where to study. The core information it contains is called the Unistats dataset (formerly the Key Information Set (KIS)).