Civil and Environmental Engineering

This hands-on Civil and Environmental Engineering degree is top in Scotland and the only Scottish BEng programme to offer a guaranteed 12-week work placement.

Course detail

Start Date

September

Duration

4 years (full-time) BEng (Hons) | 5 years (full-time) MEng

Award Title

MEng/BEng (Hons)

UCAS Code

H3H3 BEng (Hons) | H2H2 MEng

Civil and Environmental Engineering

COURSE IN CLEARING. FIND YOUR PLACE.  

Why Study Abertay's MEng/BEng (Hons) in Civil and Environmental Engineering?

Our course is ranked 8th in the UK by the the 2021 Guardian Guide, and the top course in Scotland. It is the only Scottish Civil Engineering undergraduate degree with a guaranteed work placement during Year 3.

By studying Civil and Environmental Engineering at Abertay, you’ll gain the knowledge and skills you need to become a Chartered Civil Engineer. You’ll also help contribute to the health and wellbeing of individuals, communities, and societies by understanding interactions between buildings, infrastructure, and the environment.

This degree will give you a firm grounding across a wide range of civil and environmental engineering applications, with plenty of practical and hands-on experience gained through industry partners, including Transport Scotland, Balfour Beatty, Sweco, BAM, and BEAR Scotland.

As you progress, you’ll get a chance to work directly in the industry – an integrated part of your degree – and to take a deeper focus on specific areas that impact the built, human and natural environment.

Abertay is widely regarded as THE place to come for high quality teaching. But don't take our word for it:

  • UK University of the Year 2021 - Teaching Quality (The Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide).
  • UK Top 10 - Student Satisfaction & Teaching (Guardian Good University Guide 2021).
  • UK Top 10 - Student Satisfaction (National Student Survey 2020).

Accreditation

The BEng (Hons) / MEng Civil and Environmental Engineering is accredited by the Institution of Civil Engineers, the Institution of Structural Engineers, the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation and the Institute of Highway Incorporated Engineers.

The BEng (Hons) Civil and Environmental Engineering degree is accredited as: 

  1. Fully satisfying the educational base for an Incorporated Engineer (IEng).
  2. Partially satisfying the educational base for a Chartered Engineer (CEng).

The MEng Civil and Environmental Engineering degree is accredited as fully satisfying the educational base for a Chartered Engineer (CEng). See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) Accreditation

Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE) Accreditation

Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT) Accreditation

Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE) Accreditation

Online Open Days 2021

An Online Open Day is a great way to help you decide what and where you want to study.

Join us virtually on Wed 29 Sep or Sat 30 Oct to chat to lecturers and students, see the facilities for the course(s) you're interested in, and get a flavour of our city-centre campus.

BOOK YOUR PLACE

An Abertay Student on a yellow coloured background

Work Placement

We're unique in that we offer a guaranteed, high-calibre work placement to all of our students in their third year of study. For 12 weeks you'll set up shop in an engineering practice as far as Inverness or Glasgow. Your placement will give insight into an engineering specialism, from onsite construction to design consultation. This often leads on to continued work placements and even a space on a graduate scheme upon graduation. 

Constructionarium

You’ll also gain practical experience by attending Constructionarium - a week-long construction experience in year 2. This provides a hands-on construction experience for students, allowing you to construct scaled down versions of bridges, buildings, dams and civil engineering projects. 

 

Group working together in civil engineering workshop

About Your Modules

All modules shown are indicative and reflect course content for the current academic year. Modules are reviewed annually and may be subject to change. If you receive an offer to study with us we will send you a Programme document  that sets out exactly which modules you can expect to take as part of your Abertay University degree programme. Please see Terms and Conditions for more information.

 

Modules

Year 1 Core Modules

You must study and pass all five core modules

Brief description

The basic mathematical skills for engineering and the fundamentals of structural analysis.

Indicative content:

  • Mathematics: Simultaneous linear equations. Vectors: addition and product. Vector formulation: force and moment. Equivalent systems. Centre of area, mass and gravity. 2nd moment of area. Functions and graphs including exponential and logarithmic functions. Basic Trigonometry: trigonometric functions, ratios, similar triangles. Basic Statistics: statistical functions and their significance.
  • Structures: Quantities and units. Structural Concepts: structural elements, actions (Loads) and their effects, elastic vs plastic behaviour. Forces and Moments: resolution and composition, coplanar concurrent and non-concurrent force systems, resultant and equilibrant, Laws of Triangle and Polygon of forces; Moment of a force, Static Equilibrium. Statically Determinate Trusses, Beams and Frames: supports, loads and reactions, requirements of static equilibrium, shear force and bending moment diagrams.

Brief description

Learn a range of life-long civil engineering professional skills and gain an introduction to the diversity of civil engineer skills in the development, procurement and sustainable management of construction projects. Learn to apply construction industry skills within a civil engineering context during the pre-construction phase of a project.

Indicative content:

  • Drawing and visualisation: Use proprietary software and sketching to produce 2D. Interrogate drawing files to obtain length, area and volume data. Introduction to 3D visualisation and data types.
  • Resource management: Introduction to planning the allocation of resources by construction organisations to projects.
  • Pre-construction phase activities: An introduction to the range of activities in construction projects covering: developing and preparing a client brief; procurement strategies and types of contract; introduction to BIM; tendering procedures for typical civil engineering works, sustainable design/environmental management of construction projects, ethical practice and health and safety.

Brief description

Introduction to the key concepts and themes in biology, ecology, chemistry, and anthropomorphic factors, which are essential for a broad understanding of modern environmental science.

Indicative content:

  • Biological diversity: Biological diversity, understanding how species are identified, niches and ecological roles.
  • The importance of ecosystems: The importance of ecosystems, webs and trophic interactions in an ecological context.
  • Understanding ecosystems: Understanding ecosystems in the context of local geology, topography and hydrology.
  • Role of nutrient cycles: The role of nutrient cycles and impact of pollutants in the environment; analytical technics for quantifying key chemicals.
  • Biogeochemical processes: Biogeochemical processes, nutrient cycles; interconnectedness of spheres (atmosphere, biosphere, ocean sphere, cryosphere, geosphere).

Brief description

Basic mathematical skills for engineering and the fundamentals of structural analysis.

Indicative content:

  • Algebra: Gaussian elimination to solve a 3x3 system of linear equations, investigating features of graphs and sketching graphs of functions, find­ing the asymptotes to the graphs of rational function understanding and using matrix algebra, determinant and inverse of a matrix.
  • Differential Calculus: Derivatives of basic functions including product, quotient, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, maxima and minima, partial differentiation, first and second order differential equations.
  • Integral Calculus: Integrals of basic functions, integration by substitution and by parts, area bounded by a curve.
  • Axial Force: Direct stress and strain, Modulus of Elasticity, typical behav­iour of ductile materials, thermal loading, composite sections.
  • Stress due to bending: Simple bending theory, second moment of area, theorem of parallel axes, section modulus, composite Sections.
  • Shear and torsion: Horizontal shear stress distribution in beams Torsion of circular shafts: torsion equation, second polar moment of area.
  • Elastic deformation of beams: Calculation from first principles, formulae and computer packages.

Brief description

Introduction to landscape processes and surveying. Understand geology, hydrology and geomorphology, and methods for assessing and understanding landscape forms. Gain surveying practice skills suitable for engineering and environmental application.

Indicative content:

  • Introduction to Earth Surface Processes: The origin and structure of the earth - Including large scale processes (earthquakes, volcanoes) and long-time scales (geological formations).
  • Introduction to Geology: Minerals (properties of common rock forming minerals); Rocks (geological origin and identification of rocks); Structural Geology (principles of stratigraphy and structural geology : dip and strike, folds, faults and unconformities).
  • Introduction to Environmental Systems: Environmental systems and cycles − The Physical Environment (Geomorphological and Hydrological processes).
  • Human forces behind environmental issues: Population, technology, socio−cultural organisation, etc.
  • Environmental problems related to landscape processes: Including air pollution, water pollution, contaminated land, waste disposal, agricultural pollution, noise pollution, deforestation and soil erosion, and urbanisation.
  • Surveying: Apply the principles of good practice in land surveying, with knowledge of the accuracies achievable/required for different industry/ construction-related tasks.
  • Surveying tasks: Demonstrate standard field techniques and methods of calculation and computational data-manipulation used in various surveying tasks applied to industry/construction.
  • Three-dimensional survey: Complete a detailed three-dimensional survey of a small area of land.
  • Surveying theory and practice: Demonstrate an understanding of surveying theory and carry out calculations related to surveying practice.

Years 1 and 2 Elective Modules

You must study and pass one elective module of your choosing

Brief description

Introduction of the concept of smart cities - hard infrastructure, social capital including local skills and community institutions, and digital technologies to fuel sustainable economic development and provide an attractive environment for all.

Module content:

  • Social impacts

There is an overall need for theoretical and methodological plurality in how we assess the impact and value of future cities in terms for individual and societal well−being. Gaps in our understanding relate to the complex ways individuals and groups engage with built and natural settings, the cultural goods and consequent benefits that may arise and the inequalities associated with these cultural benefits.

  • Security

Different types of cyber-attacks that could be launched against a Smart City. Impact of cyber-attacks. Approaches to securing the smart grid and critical infrastructure, i.e. improving cyber resilience.

  • Sustainable urban food production

Includes the long established allotments movement to large-scale projects based on sustainability throughout the food chain. Urban food production includes the long established allotments movement. The demand for urban growing also responds to the densification and intensification of living areas, due to population rise, migration and demographic aging with lower housing and ‘garden’ space standards placing greater importance on collective production.

  • Energy, waste and water

At present, water and wastewater facilities are often the largest and most energy intensive responsibilities owned and operated by local governments, representing up to 35% of municipal energy use. Future cities will need to utilise more sustainable methods of water and wastewater management and renewable energy production.

  • Digital technologies

​Digital technologies will play a major role in creating sustainable and resilient cities offering a vehicle for more inclusive decision−making process and promoting dialog amongst architects, urban planners, the public and technologists.

Brief description

Develop a range of skills, knowledge and techniques within the natural, technological and social sciences relevant to the study of environmental sustainability and life in the twenty-first century. Understand the critical issues that confront humanity and begin to discern appropriate responses.

Module content:

The challenge of sustainable development
Problems associated with life in the 21st Century and the relationship to scientific provisionalism and uncertainty.

The genesis of sustainable development concept
Developments associated with the Club of Rome are outlined while Limits to Growth and the Tragedy of the Commons.

Evolution of sustainable development
The Reo Summit and Suitability, and Policy Developments thereof.

Scientific inquiry and sustainable development
Controversial issues like climate change, oil peak, and food production and the role of science in helping delimit them as problematic.

Mainstreaming sustainability
Sustainability and Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience, as individual and social concerns, and their role in transformation.

Communicating sustainability
Human well-being, Environmental Justice, Environmental Policy and the practicalities of Sustainability in Scotland.

Sustainable development in practice
Community Empowerment associated with Land Reform. Energy Production and Food Production in Tayside.

Ethics and sustainability policy
Active citizenship and globalisation.

Innovating locally, transforming globally
Transformations required to embrace Sustainability.

Active relationship for sustainable futures
Thinking globally, acting locally.

Brief decription

How lifestyle can affect physical and mental well-being. Reflect on your own lifestyle choices and how to incorporate good health behaviours into your life.

Module content:

  • Sleep and stress
    The impact of sleep and stress on health and performance. Completion of sleep diaries and questionnaires related to sleep patterns and stress.
     
  • Physical activity
    Current physical activity recommendations, components of physical fitness.
     
  • Physical inactivity
    Understanding why people are inactive. The link between physical inactivity, obesity and type 2 diabetes.
     
  • Physical activity and mental well-being
    The effects of physical activity on mental well-being.
     
  • The effect of carbohydrate consumption and exercise on blood glucose
    Measurement and recording of blood glucose in response to the carbohydrate ingestion and exercise.
     
  • Simple health and fitness testing
    Measurement and recording of data. Tests will include blood pressure, strength, endurance and flexibility. Data will be compared with normative values for these tests.

Brief decription

Develop critical thinking skills that form the basis for progression across the academic disciplines of the university. Learn how to recognise, construct, evaluate, criticise and defend different forms of argument.

Module content:

•    Potential 'timeless' debates 
Debates delivered by internal and external experts on: e.g. existence of God; privacy and civil society; private property; money as source of 'evil'; nature/nurture; free speech; pornography; capital punishment; prostitution; animal experimentation; meaning of justice; abortion; affirmative action; just war; trade union power; good life/good political community; human nature; monarchy; value of democracy; meaning of equality; citizenship rights.

•    Potential 'timely' debates
Debates delivered by internal and external experts on: eg, Scottish independence, academic freedom; drug legalisation; drug use in sport; immigration; free health care; war on terror; EU membership; euthanasia; progressive taxation; race and gender discrimination; gay marriage; human rights; politics/sport; global warming; internet censorship; nuclear power; education league tables; nuclear weapons; GM agriculture; religion; cloning; fair trade; value of contemporary culture.

•    Critical thinking seminars
Follow-up discursive discipline specific seminar sessions led by teaching staff on topics covered in formal debates. Learn to identify types of argument presented, evaluate perspectives and to reflect upon their own reasoning processes and value assumptions. The debates and seminars facilitate a foundation for the acquisition of graduate attributes.

•    WEB CT Wiki discussion forum
Work in small groups to write a short 800 word indicative "Thinking Summary" online Wiki of the arguments presented in each debate. These summaries will be constructed by each designated Thinking Group of three students using the Wiki facility on Blackboard which will facilitate further discussion on the moderated WEB CT discussion forum.

Brief decription

The social, managerial, economic, political, and technical challenges and opportunities associated with emerging renewable energy innovation, production, supply and consumption.


Module content:

•    Renewable energy non-technical challenges and opportunities
Social and political challenges and opportunities of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Economic and environmental challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Strategic and managerial challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption.


•    Renewable energy technological challenges and opportunities
Geotechnical, Geophysical and Hydrographic information; Knowledge of sources of hydrographic information and interpretation of published charts. Forces on structures; Appreciation of the various forces acting on marine structures. Technical limitations and challenges of energy distribution systems and energy storage. Current technological development trend, collaborative innovation in renewable energy.

Brief decription

An understanding of the concepts of tolerance, and the importance of making sound ethical decisions. Develop the qualities, characteristics and skills to meet the aspiration for Abertay graduates to become global and active citizens. 

Module content:

•    Introduction to equality and ethics legislation 

•    Diversity competence and moral/ethical reasoning 
Inclusiveness, equal opportunities, positive action, reasonable adjustment.

•    Attributes for the workplace and for global citizenship.

•    Reflective practice 
Application of models of reflective practice.

•    Contemporary issues

Brief decription

Learn how to adjust language to suit context. Analyse a range of linguistic issues, including “proper English”, how language can be used to create moral panics, and the ethics of communication.

Module content:

•    “Good English”
The role of standardisation, dialect and idiolect − how we choose language to reflect our identities and our role in a speech or discourse community.

Language and influence
How the media constructs narratives to persuade or inform the audience (and how to tell the difference).

Creating a narrative across genres
The conventions, freedoms and limitations of different forms; using these forms in new ways.

Narrative changes over time
How authors reinvent old stories to reflect current concerns.

Technical writing
The use and manipulation of data; hearing the author's voice; critiquing "bad science".

The ethics of communication
 (Electronic) media and ownership, attribution and theft.

Brief decription

“Personal” digital safety to make computer security fun, practical and eye-opening.  Learn the base knowledge that will continue to be relevant to future generations of devices.

Module content:

•    Current state of computer security
An overview including legal aspects.

•    Cyber-attacks, vulnerabilities and threats
Malware, Network attacks (denial of service, packet sniffing etc.), bots and rootkits. How the bad guys can obtain your password.

•    Information leakage
Recovery and forensics recovering deleted or corrupted files. What your browser knows about you. Web browser forensics.

•    Securing networks, accounts and devices
Defence against malware, honeypots, Secure protocols, intrusion detection, Password security, Mobile device security.

•    Human aspects of cyber security 
The Psychology of Hackers, Social Engineering, identity theft, Usability vs security.

•    Breaking the code
An introduction to cryptography, Encryption and Decryption, public and private keys, the key exchange problem.

•    History of cryptography 
The Caesar cipher, polyalphabetic ciphers, the Playfair cipher, the role of Enigma and the Bletchley Park cryptographers in WWII.

•    Computers and Crypto Diffie-Hellman and RSA encryption
Phil Zimmerman and “Pretty Good Protection". Quantum Cryptography – Provably unbreakable information hiding. Mathematical Underpinnings – Large prime numbers and why they matter.

•    Steganography
 A picture's worth a thousand words when you're hiding the wood in the trees.

•    The law, society and cryptography 
Why you can be imprisoned for forgetting your password. The Civil Liberties Arguments for and against strong-crypto. International perspectives on information hiding, information freedom, the right to privacy and the conflicts between these. Are unbreakable cyphers an unqualified “good thing”?

Brief decription

Develop perspectives on the key challenges faced by humankind such as environmental change, pollution, food security, energy provision, conflicts, terrorism, emerging diseases, and changing demographics. Understand the overwhelming complexity of the problems and the need for interdisciplinary approaches to create solutions.

Module content:

  • Interdisciplinary research
    Introductory lectures will discuss the definitions, methods, benefits, challenges, and drawbacks of disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches and the role of public policy influencing research
     
  • Global challenges
    Challenges from different disciplines. Examples include: Climate Change: causes and impact; Serious Games: science and application of visualization and games; Global Security: valuing ecosystems: balancing policy, economics and environment; Contemporary Challenges to Healthy Living; Food Security: global threats and local needs; Energy Poverty: space travel.

Brief decription

Design an activity to communicate and present scientific principles to primary school children. Learn about working as a group and how to communicate complex ideas.

Module content:

Developing a science communication activity
Target audience, sources of information to identify suitable activities (CfE documentation etc.), health and safety, issues around working with specific groups, accessibility, ethics, costing and sustainability.

The landscape of engagement and current practice
Types of public engagement activities, target audiences, funding, role of learned societies, universities and other bodies. Public engagement in Dundee and Tayside.

Brief description

Work in a team to develop game design concepts for serious applications. Gain the knowledge, processes and techniques of game design and study examples of serious games developed to benefit society.

Module content:

•    Overview of Games
A brief history of games, game art and gamification.

•    Games for change
Understanding how games can benefit society.

•    Game mechanics
Deconstructing core components of popular game genres.

•    Gameplay constructs
What is gameplay and how is this broken down and communicated within the game design.

•    The game design process
Conceptualisation, iteration, phases of workflow.

•    Game design theory and practice
Identifying the elements within effective design and how they are implemented.

•    Documenting the design interactive
Oriented design, technical design, capturing requirements.

•    Business models
Exploring methods that can be used to generate revenue within the game design.

Brief decription

Develop the knowledge and awareness required to make good career decisions and the skills and confidence to successfully navigate each stage of the recruitment process for graduate jobs.

Module content:

  • Developing self-awareness
    Profiling of personal strengths, values and priorities in relation to career choice.
     
  • Developing opportunity awareness
    Generating career ideas based on your personal profile; Exploring the range of graduate opportunities within job sectors of interest; Reviewing occupations that are directly related to your own subject discipline.
     
  • Developing a career action plan
    Matching your personal profile with best fit opportunities in the job market; Creating a timeline of actions to improve your prospects of meeting your aim.
  • Developing job seeking skills
    Sourcing suitable job opportunities - both advertised and unadvertised; Creating a professional image online; Identifying the skills and qualities employers look for in graduates; Learning how to produce targeted applications for specific job roles; Practising the presentation of your strengths and motivations in face to face selection activities.

Brief decription

Learn about natural disaster such as landslides and flooding, structural disasters such as the Tay Rail Bridge and the system of critical infrastructure (such as road, rail, air and shipping transport networks, power grid, gas and water networks, health system) that constitute the backbone of modern societies.

Module content:

•    Overview of the scope and the content of concept of critical infrastructure failure during natural disasters and resilience against such failures
The consequences of geophysical, hydrological and meteorological disasters on critical infrastructure and critical infrastructure protection capabilities against natural disasters. Interdependencies of critical infrastructures during large disasters, presents a brief review of current research being done in this field, and presents a methodology to address interdependencies.


•    The identification of the vulnerabilities of the critical systems
The critical systems upon which modern society, economy, and polity depend. The identification of the vulnerabilities of these systems threats that might exploit these vulnerabilities. The effort to develop techniques to mitigate these vulnerabilities through improved design.


•     Flooding in Scotland
General overview of fluvial, pluvial and coastal flooding, the structural, economic and societal impact and responses to flooding. Resources will include historical examples, current policies and information (including SEPA flood maps). Case study (with virtual/actual field visit?) the Perth Floods of 1990 and 1993 and the Perth flood defence scheme*


•    Landslide origins, types and mitigations
General overview what landslides are, why they happen and what can be done to prevent them.


•    Structural failure
An example such as why the Tay Bridge failed and what it meant for the Forth Rail Bridge.


•    Reports and investigations
The role of reports in accident and disaster investigations in creating informative reports; case studies of accidents, disasters, learning from history, learning from case studies, learning from common law

Brief decription

Introduction to the skills and knowledge needed to launch a small business successfully. This module will define and help you acquire the personal and professional skills needed to develop a professional career and/or to succeed as entrepreneurs in Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs).

Module content:

  • Understanding entrepreneurship.
     
  • Generating successful business ideas.
     
  • Environmental scanning.
     
  • Developing a credible business plan that includes evaluating business ideas.
     
  • Presenting the business idea.

Brief decription

An understanding of some of the processes involved in food production. Discuss common misconceptions and ideas which present the food and nutritional industries in a bad light.

Module content:

•    Student led investigations
Student led investigations of the different sectors within the food and drink industry including: prebiotics – and the controversy surrounding the term; if barbequing is a healthy cooking method; and exposing the celebrity chef - common Myths about cooking.


•    Consumerism
Does the food industry listen to us? Understanding consumer and sensory science to better understand why you buy the products you buy.  How food/public health is reported by the media? The French paradox / Mediterranean diet.


•    Future of food
Ethical food production and the future of foods, and what’s waste got to do with it?


•    Debunking myths
Debunking food myths, more science than science fiction in our food today, like the science behind getting sauce out of a bottle and what to drink – Whisky or Beer?


•    Facts from fiction
Finding facts from fiction, investigating the three-second rule – should I eat things that have fallen on the floor? What’s so super about super-foods? Fat or sugar: Which is worse?

Brief decription

Learn how we approach and understand mental health, from historic, social, therapeutic, and individual perspectives. Explore questions such as ‘what is madness?’, ‘how does society position people with mental illness?’, and ‘how do we best respond to challenges to our mental health?’

Module content:

  • Historical and cultural perspective on mental illness
    How do we ‘think’ about mental health, and mental ill health?
     
  • Diagnosis and the anti-psychiatry movement
    Who holds the power to decide what is normal in terms of psychological well-being and behaviour?
     
  • Gender, culture and mental health
    How gendered cultural expectations and representations influence how we respond to mental health issues.
     
  • Media representations
    The impact of film and literature on attitudes and understandings of mental health.
     
  • Resilience, treatment and recovery
    Common mental health problems in the UK, treatment and management, and frameworks for enhancing well-being and resilience.

Brief decription

An introduction to the wide range of disciplines in forensic investigation. Learn how crimes are investigated from the moment of reporting through to the presentation of the evidence in court. A hypothetical case study provides an over-arching framework in which to explore the critical aspects of forensic investigations. It involves not only physical and electronic evidence, but also statements from witnesses, suspects and victims which requires cross discipline collaboration of professionals.


Module content:

Crime scene investigation
How a crime scene is examined in the context of incomplete contextual information and to avoid loss or contamination of evidence and the maximising of the value of evidential material.

Media involvement
Positive and negative effects of the media/public interest in the crime.

Forensic biology
Examination and evidential value of body fluids, DNA, hairs and fibres.

Forensic chemistry
Analysis for drugs, toxicological analysis, firearms, explosives, and trace evidence.

Digital sources
Evidence from CCT, mobile phones, computer hardware, on−line behaviour.

Forensic reasoning and practice
An introduction to forensic problem solving, thinking styles, case assessment and interpretation.

Psychology of witnesses and suspects
False confessions, offender profiling, effects and avoidance of cognitive bias in forensic science through process design.

Year 2 Core Modules

You must study and pass all five core modules

Brief description

Advanced structural analysis and basic structural design procedures.

Indicative content:

  • Structural analysis: Compression members: modes of failure, slenderness and instability, Euler’s buckling load i.e. timber columns. Basic concepts: Statically determinate vs statically indeterminate structures i.e. flexibility and stiffness methods. Influence lines Symmetry.
  • Structural design: Requirements of structural design, design philosophies. Design requirements, loads and material strengths, partial safety factors, design process Introduction to timber column design. Introduction to masonry. Introduction temporary works.
  • Laboratory work: Timber beams tested to destruction and Buckling of (model). Struts.

Brief description

Learn practical application of civil and environmental engineering skills, techniques and knowledge. 

Indicative content:

  • Land Surveying: Large area traverse control survey; levelling survey for vertical control; detailed topographical survey using total stations / electronic data capture; computer processing and plot production; calculations for setting out (plan position and vertical control); setting out for small projects.
  • Preparation of profession report and plan diagrams: Preparation of profession report and plan diagrams based on field application of surveying techniques and practice.
  • Construction Practice: Planning, execution and appraisal for the construction of a civil engineering activity; temporary works; materials and equipment requirements, method statements, resource management, health and safety assessment, sustainability assessment.
  • Professional reporting: Preparation and professional reporting of engineering practice and outcomes.
  • Risk assessment: Awareness and application of risk assessment and health and safety requirements for all aspects of engineering practice.
  • Sustainability considerations: Awareness and application of sustainability considerations for all aspects of engineering practice.
  • Conceptual design: Client requirements; scheme design and evaluation.

Brief description

Fundamental principles of hydrology and hydrostatics. Learn to apply these principles to model problems relevant to water resources and civil engineering.

Indicative content:

  • Hydrology: Review of the hydrological cycle. Fundamental principles of hydrology. Precipitation, occurrence and forms, estimation and measurements, rain gauges and methods of data handling. Evaporational influences and estimation methods.
  • Water Use and Quality: Demand, use and re-use of water. Sustainable water use. Human and environmental needs for water and water conservation. Introduction to water quality parameters; quality of various types and sources of water; factors affecting quality.
  • Water related disasters, and Sustainable Water Management: Floods and droughts - nature and causes. Sustainable water management, sustainable catchment management and sustainable drainage systems (SUDS).
  • Fluid Properties: Review of the properties of liquid fluids. Reynolds experiment; Reynolds number, mean velocity, discharge; description of types and patterns of flow; velocity gradients, laminar and turbulent motion, streamlines and flow nets.
  • Fluid Statics: Variation of pressure in a fluid; pressure measurements; pressure forces on surfaces; hydrostatic forces on plane and curved surfaces submerged in fluids; buoyancy forces; stability and metacentric height.
  • Fluid Dynamics: Continuity equations, conservation of mass, steady flow; Bernoulli equations: application to devices; the momentum equation.

Brief description

The properties and application of a range of construction materials as an introduction to highway design and Building Information Modelling (BIM).

Indicative content:

  • Properties and Uses of Materials: Origin, occurrence, appearances, identification, classification, properties, manufacture, conversion, production and uses of various construction materials; material selection and specification, sustainability of materials.
  • Materials Testing: Testing and evaluation applied to common construction materials.
  • Highway Engineering: Road Alignment: Theory and practice in the layout of vertical and horizontal curvature. Road realignment project with a focus on sustainability. Computer based road design packages. Influence of safety on design solutions.
  • Highway Intersections: Layout and analysis of priority junctions, roundabouts, signal control and grade- separated interchanges. Influence of safety on design solutions. Highway Materials, Design and Construction Pavement construction: flexible and rigid pavements, bound and unbound materials, mix design, specification for materials and construction, testing. Pavement loading, design of flexible and rigid pavements. Sustainability and recycling issues.
  • Highway Pavements: Design and Construction Pavement construction: flexible and rigid pavements, bound and unbound materials, mix design, specification for materials and construction, testing. Pavement loading, design of flexible and rigid pavements. Sustainability and recycling issues.
  • BIM: BIM in practice, BIM in cost estimation and control.

Brief description

This module applies the principle of environmental engineering in the analysis and management of environmental pollution.

Indicative content:

  • Water Quality: Overview of the principles of air, water and land interaction and surface water quality management: Introduction of water quality and management; Fate of water pollutants in rivers and lakes; Drinking Water Quality standards, UK and EU Directives; Fundamentals of self-purification; Models used as quality predictive tools: Streeter Phelps equation.
  • Water Treatment: Coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection process.
  • Groundwater quality and management: Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction, Stream- Aquifer Interaction. Aquifer management.
  • Air quality and pollution management: Overview on sources of air pollution and monitoring and control of emissions of air pollutants; Dispersion of air pollutants in atmosphere; Air pollution modelling approaches and Indoor air pollution.
  • Environmental impact assessment (EIA): EIA procedure. Preparation of Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Case studies and EIA of developments.

Years 1 and 2 Elective Modules

You must study and pass one elective module of your choosing

Brief description

Introduction of the concept of smart cities - hard infrastructure, social capital including local skills and community institutions, and digital technologies to fuel sustainable economic development and provide an attractive environment for all.

Module content:

  • Social impacts

There is an overall need for theoretical and methodological plurality in how we assess the impact and value of future cities in terms for individual and societal well−being. Gaps in our understanding relate to the complex ways individuals and groups engage with built and natural settings, the cultural goods and consequent benefits that may arise and the inequalities associated with these cultural benefits.

  • Security

Different types of cyber-attacks that could be launched against a Smart City. Impact of cyber-attacks. Approaches to securing the smart grid and critical infrastructure, i.e. improving cyber resilience.

  • Sustainable urban food production

Includes the long established allotments movement to large-scale projects based on sustainability throughout the food chain. Urban food production includes the long established allotments movement. The demand for urban growing also responds to the densification and intensification of living areas, due to population rise, migration and demographic aging with lower housing and ‘garden’ space standards placing greater importance on collective production.

  • Energy, waste and water

At present, water and wastewater facilities are often the largest and most energy intensive responsibilities owned and operated by local governments, representing up to 35% of municipal energy use. Future cities will need to utilise more sustainable methods of water and wastewater management and renewable energy production.

  • Digital technologies

​Digital technologies will play a major role in creating sustainable and resilient cities offering a vehicle for more inclusive decision−making process and promoting dialog amongst architects, urban planners, the public and technologists.

Brief description

Develop a range of skills, knowledge and techniques within the natural, technological and social sciences relevant to the study of environmental sustainability and life in the twenty-first century. Understand the critical issues that confront humanity and begin to discern appropriate responses.

Module content:

The challenge of sustainable development
Problems associated with life in the 21st Century and the relationship to scientific provisionalism and uncertainty.

The genesis of sustainable development concept
Developments associated with the Club of Rome are outlined while Limits to Growth and the Tragedy of the Commons.

Evolution of sustainable development
The Reo Summit and Suitability, and Policy Developments thereof.

Scientific inquiry and sustainable development
Controversial issues like climate change, oil peak, and food production and the role of science in helping delimit them as problematic.

Mainstreaming sustainability
Sustainability and Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience, as individual and social concerns, and their role in transformation.

Communicating sustainability
Human well-being, Environmental Justice, Environmental Policy and the practicalities of Sustainability in Scotland.

Sustainable development in practice
Community Empowerment associated with Land Reform. Energy Production and Food Production in Tayside.

Ethics and sustainability policy
Active citizenship and globalisation.

Innovating locally, transforming globally
Transformations required to embrace Sustainability.

Active relationship for sustainable futures
Thinking globally, acting locally.

Brief description

How lifestyle can affect physical and mental well-being. Reflect on your own lifestyle choices and how to incorporate good health behaviours into your life.

Module content:

  • Sleep and stress
    The impact of sleep and stress on health and performance. Completion of sleep diaries and questionnaires related to sleep patterns and stress.
     
  • Physical activity
    Current physical activity recommendations, components of physical fitness.
     
  • Physical inactivity
    Understanding why people are inactive. The link between physical inactivity, obesity and type 2 diabetes.
     
  • Physical activity and mental well-being
    The effects of physical activity on mental well-being.
     
  • The effect of carbohydrate consumption and exercise on blood glucose
    Measurement and recording of blood glucose in response to the carbohydrate ingestion and exercise.
     
  • Simple health and fitness testing
    Measurement and recording of data. Tests will include blood pressure, strength, endurance and flexibility. Data will be compared with normative values for these tests.

Brief description

Develop critical thinking skills that form the basis for progression across the academic disciplines of the university. Learn how to recognise, construct, evaluate, criticise and defend different forms of argument.

Module content:

•    Potential 'timeless' debates 
Debates delivered by internal and external experts on: e.g. existence of God; privacy and civil society; private property; money as source of 'evil'; nature/nurture; free speech; pornography; capital punishment; prostitution; animal experimentation; meaning of justice; abortion; affirmative action; just war; trade union power; good life/good political community; human nature; monarchy; value of democracy; meaning of equality; citizenship rights.

•    Potential 'timely' debates
Debates delivered by internal and external experts on: eg, Scottish independence, academic freedom; drug legalisation; drug use in sport; immigration; free health care; war on terror; EU membership; euthanasia; progressive taxation; race and gender discrimination; gay marriage; human rights; politics/sport; global warming; internet censorship; nuclear power; education league tables; nuclear weapons; GM agriculture; religion; cloning; fair trade; value of contemporary culture.

•    Critical thinking seminars
Follow-up discursive discipline specific seminar sessions led by teaching staff on topics covered in formal debates. Learn to identify types of argument presented, evaluate perspectives and to reflect upon their own reasoning processes and value assumptions. The debates and seminars facilitate a foundation for the acquisition of graduate attributes.

•    WEB CT Wiki discussion forum
Work in small groups to write a short 800 word indicative "Thinking Summary" online Wiki of the arguments presented in each debate. These summaries will be constructed by each designated Thinking Group of three students using the Wiki facility on Blackboard which will facilitate further discussion on the moderated WEB CT discussion forum.

Brief description

The social, managerial, economic, political, and technical challenges and opportunities associated with emerging renewable energy innovation, production, supply and consumption.

Module content:

•    Renewable energy non-technical challenges and opportunities
Social and political challenges and opportunities of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Economic and environmental challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption. Strategic and managerial challenges of renewable energy production supply and consumption.


•    Renewable energy technological challenges and opportunities
Geotechnical, Geophysical and Hydrographic information; Knowledge of sources of hydrographic information and interpretation of published charts. Forces on structures; Appreciation of the various forces acting on marine structures. Technical limitations and challenges of energy distribution systems and energy storage. Current technological development trend, collaborative innovation in renewable energy.

Brief description

An understanding of the concepts of tolerance, and the importance of making sound ethical decisions. Develop the qualities, characteristics and skills to meet the aspiration for Abertay graduates to become global and active citizens. 

Module content:

•    Introduction to equality and ethics legislation 

•    Diversity competence and moral/ethical reasoning 
Inclusiveness, equal opportunities, positive action, reasonable adjustment.

•    Attributes for the workplace and for global citizenship.

•    Reflective practice 
Application of models of reflective practice.

•    Contemporary issues

Brief description

Learn how to adjust language to suit context. Analyse a range of linguistic issues, including “proper English”, how language can be used to create moral panics, and the ethics of communication.

Module content:

•    “Good English”
The role of standardisation, dialect and idiolect − how we choose language to reflect our identities and our role in a speech or discourse community.

Language and influence
How the media constructs narratives to persuade or inform the audience (and how to tell the difference).

Creating a narrative across genres
The conventions, freedoms and limitations of different forms; using these forms in new ways.

Narrative changes over time
How authors reinvent old stories to reflect current concerns.

Technical writing
The use and manipulation of data; hearing the author's voice; critiquing "bad science".

The ethics of communication
 (Electronic) media and ownership, attribution and theft.

Brief description

“Personal” digital safety to make computer security fun, practical and eye-opening.  Learn the base knowledge that will continue to be relevant to future generations of devices.

Module content:

•    Current state of computer security
An overview including legal aspects.

•    Cyber-attacks, vulnerabilities and threats
Malware, Network attacks (denial of service, packet sniffing etc.), bots and rootkits. How the bad guys can obtain your password.

•    Information leakage
Recovery and forensics recovering deleted or corrupted files. What your browser knows about you. Web browser forensics.

•    Securing networks, accounts and devices
Defence against malware, honeypots, Secure protocols, intrusion detection, Password security, Mobile device security.

•    Human aspects of cyber security 
The Psychology of Hackers, Social Engineering, identity theft, Usability vs security.

•    Breaking the code
An introduction to cryptography, Encryption and Decryption, public and private keys, the key exchange problem.

•    History of cryptography 
The Caesar cipher, polyalphabetic ciphers, the Playfair cipher, the role of Enigma and the Bletchley Park cryptographers in WWII.

•    Computers and Crypto Diffie-Hellman and RSA encryption
Phil Zimmerman and “Pretty Good Protection". Quantum Cryptography – Provably unbreakable information hiding. Mathematical Underpinnings – Large prime numbers and why they matter.

•    Steganography
 A picture's worth a thousand words when you're hiding the wood in the trees.

•    The law, society and cryptography 
Why you can be imprisoned for forgetting your password. The Civil Liberties Arguments for and against strong-crypto. International perspectives on information hiding, information freedom, the right to privacy and the conflicts between these. Are unbreakable cyphers an unqualified “good thing”?

Brief decription

Develop perspectives on the key challenges faced by humankind such as environmental change, pollution, food security, energy provision, conflicts, terrorism, emerging diseases, and changing demographics. Understand the overwhelming complexity of the problems and the need for interdisciplinary approaches to create solutions.

Module content:

  • Interdisciplinary research
    Introductory lectures will discuss the definitions, methods, benefits, challenges, and drawbacks of disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches and the role of public policy influencing research
     
  • Global challenges
    Challenges from different disciplines. Examples include: Climate Change: causes and impact; Serious Games: science and application of visualization and games; Global Security: valuing ecosystems: balancing policy, economics and environment; Contemporary Challenges to Healthy Living; Food Security: global threats and local needs; Energy Poverty: space travel.

Brief description

Design an activity to communicate and present scientific principles to primary school children. Learn about working as a group and how to communicate complex ideas.

Module content:

Developing a science communication activity
Target audience, sources of information to identify suitable activities (CfE documentation etc.), health and safety, issues around working with specific groups, accessibility, ethics, costing and sustainability.

The landscape of engagement and current practice
Types of public engagement activities, target audiences, funding, role of learned societies, universities and other bodies. Public engagement in Dundee and Tayside.

Brief description

Work in a team to develop game design concepts for serious applications. Gain the knowledge, processes and techniques of game design and study examples of serious games developed to benefit society.

Module content:

•    Overview of Games
A brief history of games, game art and gamification.

    Games for change
Understanding how games can benefit society.

•    Game mechanics
Deconstructing core components of popular game genres.

•    Gameplay constructs
What is gameplay and how is this broken down and communicated within the game design.

•    The game design process
Conceptualisation, iteration, phases of workflow.

•    Game design theory and practice
Identifying the elements within effective design and how they are implemented.

•    Documenting the design interactive
Oriented design, technical design, capturing requirements.

•    Business models
Exploring methods that can be used to generate revenue within the game design.

Brief description

Develop the knowledge and awareness required to make good career decisions and the skills and confidence to successfully navigate each stage of the recruitment process for graduate jobs.

Module content:

  • Developing self-awareness
    Profiling of personal strengths, values and priorities in relation to career choice.
     
  • Developing opportunity awareness
    Generating career ideas based on your personal profile; Exploring the range of graduate opportunities within job sectors of interest; Reviewing occupations that are directly related to your own subject discipline.
     
  • Developing a career action plan
    Matching your personal profile with best fit opportunities in the job market; Creating a timeline of actions to improve your prospects of meeting your aim.
  • Developing job seeking skills
    Sourcing suitable job opportunities - both advertised and unadvertised; Creating a professional image online; Identifying the skills and qualities employers look for in graduates; Learning how to produce targeted applications for specific job roles; Practising the presentation of your strengths and motivations in face to face selection activities.

Brief description

Learn about natural disaster such as landslides and flooding, structural disasters such as the Tay Rail Bridge and the system of critical infrastructure (such as road, rail, air and shipping transport networks, power grid, gas and water networks, health system) that constitute the backbone of modern societies.

Module content:

•    Overview of the scope and the content of concept of critical infrastructure failure during natural disasters and resilience against such failures
The consequences of geophysical, hydrological and meteorological disasters on critical infrastructure and critical infrastructure protection capabilities against natural disasters. Interdependencies of critical infrastructures during large disasters, presents a brief review of current research being done in this field, and presents a methodology to address interdependencies.


•    The identification of the vulnerabilities of the critical systems
The critical systems upon which modern society, economy, and polity depend. The identification of the vulnerabilities of these systems threats that might exploit these vulnerabilities. The effort to develop techniques to mitigate these vulnerabilities through improved design.


•     Flooding in Scotland
General overview of fluvial, pluvial and coastal flooding, the structural, economic and societal impact and responses to flooding. Resources will include historical examples, current policies and information (including SEPA flood maps). Case study (with virtual/actual field visit?) the Perth Floods of 1990 and 1993 and the Perth flood defence scheme*


•    Landslide origins, types and mitigations
General overview what landslides are, why they happen and what can be done to prevent them.


•    Structural failure
An example such as why the Tay Bridge failed and what it meant for the Forth Rail Bridge.


•    Reports and investigations
The role of reports in accident and disaster investigations in creating informative reports; case studies of accidents, disasters, learning from history, learning from case studies, learning from common law

Brief description

Introduction to the skills and knowledge needed to launch a small business successfully. This module will define and help you acquire the personal and professional skills needed to develop a professional career and/or to succeed as entrepreneurs in Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs).

Module content:

  • Understanding entrepreneurship.
     
  • Generating successful business ideas.
     
  • Environmental scanning.
     
  • Developing a credible business plan that includes evaluating business ideas.
     
  • Presenting the business idea.

Brief description

An understanding of some of the processes involved in food production. Discuss common misconceptions and ideas which present the food and nutritional industries in a bad light.

Module content:

•    Student led investigations
Student led investigations of the different sectors within the food and drink industry including: prebiotics – and the controversy surrounding the term; if barbequing is a healthy cooking method; and exposing the celebrity chef - common Myths about cooking.


•    Consumerism
Does the food industry listen to us? Understanding consumer and sensory science to better understand why you buy the products you buy.  How food/public health is reported by the media? The French paradox / Mediterranean diet.


•    Future of food
Ethical food production and the future of foods, and what’s waste got to do with it?


•    Debunking myths
Debunking food myths, more science than science fiction in our food today, like the science behind getting sauce out of a bottle and what to drink – Whisky or Beer?


•    Facts from fiction
Finding facts from fiction, investigating the three-second rule – should I eat things that have fallen on the floor? What’s so super about super-foods? Fat or sugar: Which is worse?

Brief description

Learn how we approach and understand mental health, from historic, social, therapeutic, and individual perspectives. Explore questions such as ‘what is madness?’, ‘how does society position people with mental illness?’, and ‘how do we best respond to challenges to our mental health?’

Module content:

  • Historical and cultural perspective on mental illness
    How do we ‘think’ about mental health, and mental ill health?
     
  • Diagnosis and the anti-psychiatry movement
    Who holds the power to decide what is normal in terms of psychological well-being and behaviour?
     
  • Gender, culture and mental health
    How gendered cultural expectations and representations influence how we respond to mental health issues.
     
  • Media representations
    The impact of film and literature on attitudes and understandings of mental health.
     
  • Resilience, treatment and recovery
    Common mental health problems in the UK, treatment and management, and frameworks for enhancing well-being and resilience.

Brief description

An introduction to the wide range of disciplines in forensic investigation. Learn how crimes are investigated from the moment of reporting through to the presentation of the evidence in court. A hypothetical case study provides an over-arching framework in which to explore the critical aspects of forensic investigations. It involves not only physical and electronic evidence, but also statements from witnesses, suspects and victims which requires cross discipline collaboration of professionals.

 

Module content:

Crime scene investigation
How a crime scene is examined in the context of incomplete contextual information and to avoid loss or contamination of evidence and the maximising of the value of evidential material.

Media involvement
Positive and negative effects of the media/public interest in the crime.

Forensic biology
Examination and evidential value of body fluids, DNA, hairs and fibres.

Forensic chemistry
Analysis for drugs, toxicological analysis, firearms, explosives, and trace evidence.

Digital sources
Evidence from CCT, mobile phones, computer hardware, on−line behaviour.

Forensic reasoning and practice
An introduction to forensic problem solving, thinking styles, case assessment and interpretation.

Psychology of witnesses and suspects
False confessions, offender profiling, effects and avoidance of cognitive bias in forensic science through process design.

Year 3 Core Modules

You must study and pass all four core modules

Brief description

Structural design in reinforced concrete and steel. Learn to investigate and solve geotechnical and structural problems related to the built environment.

Indicative content:

  • Design loads: Wind loading and snow loading.
  • Reinforced concrete: Material properties, limit state design requirements, loads and partial safety factors, failure mechanism and criteria Design of structural elements including singly and doubly reinforced beams, one-way and two-way slabs, axially loaded columns, foundations and cantilever retaining walls.
  • Design of steel structures: Material properties and grading, partial safety factors, section properties and classification, Design of beams subject to uniaxial bending, Design of columns and base plates, Design of steel connections.
  • Plastic collapse of steel structures: Plastic hinge formation, plastic moment capacity, plastic section modulus, shape factor, failure criterion, upper and lower bound theorems, plastic analysis of statically indeterminate beams and single storey, single bay portal frames.
  • Use of computer packages and design.
  • Laboratory work: Concrete lab. Safe working practices in a laboratory situation.

Brief description

Initial development of geotechnical analysis and design, and their application in civil engineering. Gain an understanding of soils physical and mechanical properties in theory and practice, and an introduction into geotechnical engineering problems.

Indicative content:

  • Physical properties of soil: Factors controlling the weathering of rock and the formation of soils. Moisture content, density, void ratio, porosity, air content and saturation.
  • Soil compaction and re-use: The compaction of soils − theory and practise. Suitability criteria and the re−use of fill for engineering purposes.
  • Effective stress: The concept of total and effective stress and pore water pressure.
  • Soil shear strength: The theory of soil shear strength, Mohr Coulomb failure criterion. Determine shear strength parameters for design purposes from shear box, undrained triaxial.
  • Consolidation of soils: Measurement of the consolidation of cohesive soils in the laboratory, theoretical consideration of amount and rate of settlement, over-consolidation ratio and the application of the e/log p’ graph.
  • Seepage: Flow net construction, seepage into excavations, seepage forces and piping.
  • Laboratory work: Determine moisture content, Atterberg Limit and shear strength of sand and saturated clay. Safe working practices in a laboratory situation.

Brief description

Prepare for the diverse opportunities provided within the engineering profession. Develop essential knowledge and skills in order to contribute to the organisation and management of engineering projects.

Indicative content:

  • Health and Safety: CDM and other current health and safety regulations, roles obligations and responsibilities under legislation for health and safety.
  • Procurement strategies, tendering and construction contracts: Management of the design process, estimating and tendering, pre-tender planning, construction contracts; contract formation, contractual problems. Topical procurement issues.
  • Project control tools: Planning and programming tools and techniques, strategies for managing uncertainty, PERT and related techniques. Cost control systems, quality management.
  • Economic and sustainability assessment: Economic evaluation: life Cycle costing, CEEQUAL and BREEAM. Cost benefit analysis Sustainability assessment approaches. Sustainability indicators, Multi-criteria analysis.
  • Professional employability skills: Employer/employee relationship. Interview skills and techniques. Presenting a professional CV. Equality and diversity. Professional codes of conduct (such as ICE) and specific issues including resolving ethical dilemmas through case studies.

Brief description

Gain structured and practical experience of working in the world of Civil Engineering through a work placement. As a planned part of your education and training, a placement is a complement to and an extension of the work you undertake while at university. It provides an opportunity for you to accept responsibility for your own personal and professional development, learning and training.

Indicative content:

  • Briefing: Final preparation for placement building on Civil Engineering Practice module.
  • Placement: Individual learning experiences will vary depending on the organisation to which you are attached. The work placement is unpaid and for the whole of the term. You are visited at least once during the placement period by your university supervisor.​
  • Debriefing: Follows immediately upon completion of the period of work placement and is designed to offer guidance to better enable able you to transfer your learning experience back into the university-based setting and for consideration for future learning.

Year 4 Core Modules

You must study and pass all six core modules

Brief description

Understand the interaction between geotechnical and structural analysis in the design of civil engineering structures.

Indicative content:

  • Design of foundations: Design of foundations on cohesive and granular soils and bedrock. Comprehend the value of safe and economic design.
  • Design loads: Design of gravity and cantilever retaining wall.Wind loading and snow loading.
  • Slope stability: Stability of soil and rock slopes.
  • Selected specialist subject within structural engineering. e.g. Pre-stressed concrete, fire safety

Brief description

Regulatory and technical aspects of waste and wastewater treatment and management. Gain the skills required for the selection, design, operation and maintenance of sustainable systems for the treatment and management of wastes, contaminated soil and wastewaters, and associated by-products. 

Indicative content:

  • Waste and Contaminated Land Regulations: European and UK policy on land, waste management and the role of environmental regulatory agencies. The EU/UK Waste Management Hierarchy. Different regulatory framework and approaches to remediation of contaminated groundwater, compared with contaminated land. E.g. the “limit of detection” threshold for pollutants in groundwater.
  • Waste Characterisation, Collection, Transport and Storage: Waste arisings by type, quantity and disposal route. Collection and Transport options.
  • Waste Management and Treatment Technologies: Waste minimisation, re-use and recycling. Treatment technologies: Thermal (Incineration, Pyrolysis and Gasification); Anaerobic digestion and Composting. Landfill Technology.
  • Contaminated Land Management and Remediation: Ground investigation techniques. Assessment of hazards and risks. Treatment/Remediation methodologies and techniques.
  • Wastewater Management and Treatment: Wastewater management regulations. Characterisation of municipal wastewater (sewage). Consideration of unit treatment processes and operations including sedimentation and biological processes. Analysis of various treatment systems for large and small and decentralised populations. Analysis of treatment and management options and objectives for industrial effluents.
  • Sludge Treatment and Management: Analysis of options for treatment, utilisation and disposal of wastewater treatment sludges, with associated environmental standards.

Brief description

The theories, concepts and principles of research methodology and statistical analysis and the range of methods used in conducting research. Gain the skills and knowledge necessary to undertake an original in-depth investigation in those fields. 

Indicative content:

  • Introduction to Research: The nature and purpose of research; different types of research (quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods, developmental, practice-based) and their mapping within different philosophical paradigms (positivism, interpretivism, pragmatism); strengths and weaknesses.
  • Dealing with practical issues: the research process; identifying a research topic and setting research objectives; developing a research strategy; characteristics of a good research project; ethical issues in conducting research.
  • Searching and reviewing the literature: The purposes and main steps of a literature review; searching, evaluating, organizing and synthesizing the relevant literature; and, writing a literature review and managing bibliographic records. In addition, developing research questions for qualitative and quantitative research; and identifying characteristics/attributes
  • Data collection and analysis: Approaches to data collection and analysis (quantitative, qualitative, mixed-methods, iterative); questionnaire design; populations, samples, and sampling methods; data mining.
  • Writing your research proposal: Identifying a research problem or issue, the purpose of the research and the main research question(s); choosing the research strategy and methods; writing a research proposal. In addition: discussing findings, formulating conclusions, making recommendations, and reporting; planning, executing, writing up, and submitting a dissertation.
  • Descriptive statistics for quantitative and qualitative data: Summarising and visualising data sets; finding trends in data and formulating a research hypothesis.
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistical Inference: Basic concepts of probability and probability distribution; discrete and continuous random variables; basic probability distributions; introduction to the hypothesis testing procedure.
  • The Hypothesis Testing Procedure: Parametric and non-parametric tests; Chi-squared Test for Association; Independent Sample t-Test; One and Two Way Analysis of Variance ANOVA; power calculation and sample size estimation.
  • Correlation and Regression: Relationship between two numeric variables, dependent and independent variable; Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient; Simple Linear Regression.
  • Multiple Regression: Multiple Regression Analysis and introduction to the General Linear Model.

Brief description

The opportunity to work with others as part of a diverse team, integrating skills learned in previous modulesto solve a realistic series of project problems for a construction project..

Indicative content:

  • Review of client brief: Justification of design options and production of outline design solutions.
  • Project analysis and design: including calculations and detailing of the design project.
  • Review of solutions: including sustainability assessment, taking off quantities, producing risk assessments and method statements, pricing bills of quantities and carbon costing.
  • Building information management: Review of building information management in the design and operation of the project.

Brief description

Undertake an individual in-depth study of a relevant specialised aspect of civil and environmental engineering. Provide a report and deliver a presentation.

Indicative content:

  • Supervision: A member of academic staff will assist and guide you in carrying out the project, and monitor progress. It is recommended you meet with them at least once in a fortnight to discuss progress. You must keep a log book whichis part of the assessed materials.
  • Final Report and Presentation: Submit a final written report on your chosen subject, prepared in accordance with the University's regulations for the submission of theses. Present yourself for a final oral assessment.

Brief description

Apply the fundamental principles of fluid dynamics to be able to analyse and design water infrastructure.

Indicative content:

  • Fluid dynamics: Review of basic concepts of fluid motion. Continuity equations, conservation of mass, steady flow; the Bernoulli equations: application to devices; the momentum equation.
  • Pipeline: Pipe flow and Reynolds number. Frictional effects in pipe flow and Darcy head loss equation. Analysis of pipe systems - use design aids: flow charts, computational packages.
  • Drainage systems: Combined and separate sewer systems. Urban storm water pollution control. CSOs. Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems. Estimation of foul and storm flows. Design of simple systems for foul and surface water.
  • Hydraulic machines: Types of hydraulic machines. Selection and installation of pumps, using pump and system performance curves. Cavitation and associated issues.
  • Open channels uniform flow: Frictional resistance formulae for steady uniform flow in open channels. Channel design considerations, including optimum shape of cross-section for uniform flow in open channels.
  • Non-uniform flow in open channels: Specific energy and alternative depths of flow. Occurrence of critical flow conditions. Flow over a broad-crested weir. Classification of water surface profiles. The hydraulic jump and the use of critical depth in flow measurements. Design of spillways.

How the Course Works

We’ll challenge you to ask important questions, such as:

  • What does it take to plan and build onshore and offshore wind turbines?
  • Can construction materials be reclaimed to develop new roads?
  • Are sustainable construction and low energy building challenges being met?
  • How can we work with nature to deliver more sustainable engineering solutions?

You’ll find all the answers on Scotland’s top Civil and Environmental Engineering programme.

This highly practical degree combines engineering principles with environmental science and management concepts. It equips you with the skills you need to lead the design and development of sustainable solutions to continually evolving civil and environmental engineering problems. 

The course will also develop key employment skills that are transferable amongst engineering disciplines, including:

  • Analytics and decision-making
  • Creative approach to problem-solving
  • Critical thinking and the ability to interpret data

This is enhanced with elective module choices in years 1 and 2. 

Please note: The BEng (Hons) is accredited as fully satisfying the educational base for an Incorporated Engineer (IEng) and partially satisfying the educational base for a Chartered Engineer (CEng).

You can choose to take either the five-year Integrated Masters (MEng) or the four-year Bachelor’s (BEng Hons) degree on this course.

Students who exit after stage 3, after passing 360 credits will be given the award title 'BEng in Civil Engineering'.

 

Learning and Assessment

We’re at the cutting edge of engineering – both theoretical and practical – and we offer a broad range of learning environments. This includes the traditional lecture and tutorial format, student-led learning, interactive class sessions, field trips and site-visits, and a substantial element of lab and design work.

We encourage independent study, which means you take responsibility for your own learning. A variety of methods are used to assess your study, enabling you to demonstrate progress in different ways. Coursework typically includes design challenges, laboratory reports, essays and oral presentations. Formal exams include questions that require short answers, problem-solving and design.

Year 1 is approximately 30% exam and 70% coursework. Year 4 is approximately 70% exam and 30% coursework.

Your placement will be assessed by industrial and academic supervisors, as well as by report and oral presentation.

In your final dissertation, you’re individually supported by one of our research-active members of staff.

 

Entry Requirements

Please note: All applicants must have a pass in Maths - National 5 grade C or GCSE grade C/4 or equivalent.

Please visit our Entry from College pages for suitable College courses.

Republic of Ireland applicants, please click on the UK tabs and scroll down to find your Entry Requirements.

See information about studying and applying to Abertay for International students.

Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
Higher (standard entry) BBBB Maths
Higher (minimum entry) We may make you an offer at the minimum entry grades if you meet the criteria. Find out if you're eligible for minimum entry (see below). BBC Maths
A-Level CCC Maths
Irish Highers H3H3H3H3 Maths
International Baccalaureate 28 Points Maths at S5 or H4
BTEC Extended Diploma MMM Construction and the Built Environment (all pathways)
AHEAD Successful completion of the relevant stream of our AHEAD programme
Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
Advanced Higher BBB Maths and Physics
A-Level BBB Maths and Physics
BTEC Extended Diploma DDD Construction and the Built Environment (Civil Engineering)
HNC Our Entry from College pages list approved HNC courses

We accept a wide range of qualifications from applicants from across the world. Please select your country from the searchable list below to view different qualification entry requirements. If you have different qualifications to those listed, please contact us using the form below.

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Academic Requirements

Applicants will typically be required to achieve CCC at A-Level, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma with an overall score of 28 points, to include any essential subject(s) at S5 or H4.

English language: English B at S5 or H4 is accepted. For English A, no grade is specified. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically require a High School GPA of 3.0, plus one of the following:

  • SAT (I) score of 1100
  • 3 AP Tests at grades 333
  • 3 SAT Subject Tests at 600
  • ACT Composite score of 25

A combination of AP/SAT II tests may be used, provided they are in different subjects.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) with 6 units as follows: 4 units at III, 2 units at IV, to include any essential subject(s) at III.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the European Baccalaureate with an overall grade of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

English language: English Language 1 at grade 6 or English Language 2 at grade 7 are accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the NECO in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 54%/2.00, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%/2.70.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the NECO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the WAEC in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 54%/2.00, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%/2.70.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the WAEC is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomë e Maturës Shtetëore with an overall grade of 7.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Technique / Commercial with an overall grade of 14, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat de l'Enseignement Secondaire with an overall grade of 14, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants with national school qualilfications will typically be required to pass the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 12/20, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Trayecto Técnico Profesional with an overall grade of 6.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Técnico Superior/Universitario with an overall grade of 6.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Araratian Baccalaureate at Extended Level with grades CCC, to include any essential subjects.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary General Education wih an average of 13 and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 64%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Year 12 Certificate plus ATAR rank of 77 or Overall Position of 11, to include any essential subject(s) at Year 12 with grade B, grade 3 or Sound Achievement.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Reifeprüfung/Maturazeugnis with an overall grade of 2.8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

English language: English at grade 2 in the Reifeprüfung/Maturazeugnis is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Tam Orta Tahsil Hazzinda Aggestat with an average of 4, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 62%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Shahadat Al-Thanawaya Al-Aama/General Secondary Education Certificate with an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree or post-secondary diploma in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65% or 2.25 (on the 4 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Intermediate/Higher Secondary School Certificate at an average of 2.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 50% or C+, to include any essential subject(s) at 60% or grade B.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of General Secondary Education at an average of 6, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 6.0, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur with an overall grade of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma van secundair onderwijs with an overall grade of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Abschlusszeugnis der Oberstufe des Sekundarunterrichts with an overall score of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma de Bachiller at 64%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 63%, to include any essential subject(s) at 70%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Certificate of Secondary Education at an average of 4.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificado de Conculsão de Segundo Grau with an average score of 8.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.0.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificado de Conclusão de Ensino Médio with an average score of 8.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.0.

Applicants will typically be required to pass Brunei A Levels in 3 subjects at grades CCC, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma za Sredno Obrazonvanie with an average score of 4.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma of Upper Secondary Education at average of C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalaureat or Baccalaureat Technique at an overall grade of 12, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 12.

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Secondary School Diploma or Diplôme d'Études Collégiales with five grade 12 subjects at an average of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Licencia de Education at an average of 4.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 4.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to complete Senior Middle/High School Certificate/Diploma at an average of 75%, to include any essential subject(s) at 77%; and pass GAOKAO with 500 points (based on the 750 points scheme).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Bachiller Academico at an average of 3.25, and the first year of a university degree or Tecnico Universitario in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.3, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Svjedodžba o Maturi with an overall grade of 3.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Apolytírio Lykeíou with an overall grade of 17.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 17.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vysvědčení o maturitní zkoušce with an overall grade of 2.4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3 (Dobrý).

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Studentereksamen (STX), including 3 Level A subjects an overall grade of 7, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

English language: Studentereksamen English Level A or B at grade 7 is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Bachiller at an average of 7.0, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 13 / 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Gumaasiumi lõputunnistus with an average score of 3.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4; and pass 3 state examinations at a minimum of 55% (or 2 states examinations plus C1 Advanced English CAE or IELTS).

English language: 75% in the English state examination is accepted, or C1 Advanced English CAE or IELTS (overall score 6.0 with no band lower than 5.5). For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Studentsprogv at an overall grade of 7, to include any essential subject(s) at Level A grade 7.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Ylioppilastutkinto/Studentexamen at an overall grade 4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

English language: Advanced English at grade 5 within the Ylioppilastutkinto/Studentexamen is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Général/Professionnel/Technologique at an overall grade 12, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 13.

English language. English at grade 14 in the Baccalauréat Général/Professionnel/Technologique is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Option Internationale du Baccalauréat at an overall grade 11, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 13.

English language. English at grade 13 in the Option Internationale du Baccalauréat is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sashualo Skolis Atestati (Secondary School Certificate) at an average grade of 7, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Shualo Specialuri Sastsavleblis Diplomi (Special School Leaving Diploma) at an average grade of 7, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Abitur with an overall grade of 2.4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 11.

English language: Abitur English at grade 10 is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Greek Apolytirion of Geniko Lykeio at grade 17 and 3 Pan-Hellenic exams at an average of 16, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 17.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Hong Kong HKDSE at 3333 in 4 core subjects, with elective subjects at 333 (for 3 electives) or 43 (for 2 electives), to include any essential subject(s) at 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Érettségi Bizonyítvány at an overall grade 4.0, with 2 higher subjects at grade 4, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Stúdentspróf at an overall grade 6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 6.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Indian Senior School (Year 12) exam at an average of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan/Madrasah Aliyah (SMK / MA) at 71%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Post School Qualification Diploma 1 at 2.2, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants from Ireland should check the UK Year 1 Entry tab for entry requirements with Irish Highers.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Te'udat Bagrut or Bagrut with at least 2 subjects at level 5 and 1 subject at level 4 at an average of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at Level 5 with 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma di Esame di Stato at 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8 (on the 10 point scale) or grade 16 (on the 20 point scale).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Upper Secondary School Leaving Certificate at grade 3.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Completed Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70% / 2.33, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) at an average of B, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 50%, to include any essential subject(s) at 55%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.4, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Atestas par vispārējo vidējo izglītību with an average score of 7, to include 3 state exams at a minimum of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 70%.

English language: 80% in the English state exam is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Libanais or Baccalauréat II with 12, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 12.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Brandos Atestatas with an average score of 7 with a minimum of 70% in 3 state exams, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.

English language: 80% in the English state exam is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplôme de Fin d'Études Secondaires at an overall grade of 42, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 44.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Higher Secondary Education with 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 73%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Ensino Secundário Complementar with grade 2.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Cambridge Overseas Higher School Certificate (COHSC) with grades CCC, to include any essential subject(s) at grade C.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Malawian School Certificate of Education at grade 5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 60%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM) with a minimum of 3 subjects at BCC or 2.30 GPA, to include any essential subject(s) at grade B/3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Unified Examination Certificate (UEC) with 4 subjects at 70% / B5 B5 B5 B5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 75%/B5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Matriculation Certificate Examination with grades BC at Advanced level and CCCC at Intermediate level, to include any essential subject(s) at Advanced level grade C.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomă de Bacalaureat with an overall grade of 6.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary Education at 70%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 70%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Higher Secondary Education Certificate (HSC) with 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Voorbereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO) with an overall score of 6.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

English language: English at grade 8 in HAVO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Secondary School Leaving Diploma/Matura with an overall grade of 3.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vitnemål for Vidergaende Opplaering with an overall average of 3.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

English language: English at grade 4 in the Vitnemål for Vidergaende Opplaering is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Higher Secondary School Certificate at an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 60%/2.5, to include any essential subject(s) at 68%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Matura with an average score of 60%, to include 3 Advanced subjects at a minimum of 50%, to include any essential subject(s) at Advanced level with a score of 70%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma/Certificado Nível Secundário de Educação with an overall grade of 14, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 16.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Qatar Senior School Certificate (Shahadat Al-Thanawaya Al-Aama) at an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 2.0/70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 2.5/75%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomă de Bacalaureat with an overall grade of 7, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Attestat o Srednem Obrzovanii (Certificate of Secondary Education) at an average of 4, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Secondary Education Certificate (Tawjihiyah) with an average of 60%, and either the post-secondary diploma or first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.0/70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 75%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass Singapore GCE A-Levels with grades CCC, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 75%/B5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vysvedčenie o maturitnej skúške at grade 2.4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

English language: English at B2 level at grade 2 in the Vysvedčenie o maturitnej skúške is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Maturitetno spričevalo at grade 3.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the National Senior Certificate (with Matriculation Endorsement) with 4 subjects at 5555, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Bachiller with an average score of 6.8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sudan School Certificate with an average of 60%/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%/B, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Avgangsbetyg/Slutbetyg fran Gymnasieskola with an average score of 15.5, to include any essential subject(s) at level 5 grade B.

English language: English Level 5 at grade B or English Level 6 at grade C in the Avgangsbetyg/Slutbetyg fran Gymnasieskola is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificat de Maturité or the Maturitätszeugnis or the Attestato Di Maturità with an overall grade of 4.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

Applicants will typically be required to pass Maturitätszeugnis with an overall grade of 4.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Attestato Di Maturità with an overall grade of 4.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.4, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Certificate of Secondary Education/Maw 6 with an average of 70%/3.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3; or complete the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 2.0, to include any essential subject(s) at 2.5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the High School Diploma at an average of 55%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 2.9 (on the 5 point scale) or 55 (on the 100 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65% / 2.2 (on the 4 point scale) / 4.0 (on the 5 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Secondary Education Certificate Examination at 65%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 2.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.3.

Applicants will typically require a High School GPA of 3.0, plus one of the following:

  • SAT (I) score of 1100
  • 3 AP Tests at grades 333
  • 3 SAT Subject Tests at 600
  • ACT Composite score of 25

A combination of AP/SAT II tests may be used, provided they are in different subjects.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma of Academic Lyceum at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 60%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Técnico Superior Universitario, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 50% / 6.1 (on the 10 point scale) / 12 (on the 20 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Zimbabwe General Certificate of Education at Advanced Level with grades CCC, to include any essential subject(s).


English Language Requirements

All courses at Abertay University are taught in English. If your first language is not English, you will need to demonstrate that you meet our English language requirements. Accepted English language qualifications include:

IELTS - overall score of 6.0 with no band lower than 5.5

TOEFL - overall score of 78 (individual elements: L-17, R-18, S-20, W-17)

Cambridge FCE/CAE/CPE - overall score of 169 on Cambridge Grading Scale

International Baccalaureate - English B at S5 or H4, English A no specific grade required

European Baccalaureate - English Language 1 at grade 6 or English Language 2 at grade 7

You do not need to prove your knowledge of English language if you are a national of certain countries. Please see English Language Requirements for the full list of accepted qualifications and further details.

 

If your academic qualifications aren't listed above, or if you have any further questions, please contact our international team using the form below. There is also lots of useful information for international applicants on our international pages.


Contact our International Team

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Not sure if you're eligible for entry?

If you have the potential and motivation to study at university, regardless of your background or personal circumstances, we welcome your application.

We understand some people have faced extra challenges before applying to university, which is why we consider the background in which your academic grades have been achieved when making an offer.

If you expect to receive passes in three Scottish Highers (grades A-C) and have either...

  • Been in care
  • Participated in a targeted aspiration-raising programme such as LIFT OFF, LEAPS, FOCUS West, or Aspire North
  • No family background of going to university
  • Attended a school or lived in an area where not many people go to university

...then we encourage you to submit an application.

Fees and funding

The course fees you'll pay and the funding available to you depends on factors such as your nationality, location, personal circumstances and the course you are studying. 

More information

Find out about grants, bursaries, tuition fee loans, maintenance loans and living costs in our undergraduate fees and funding section.

Scholarships

We offer a range of scholarships to help support your studies with us.

As well as Abertay scholarships for English, Welsh, Northern Irish and international students, there are a range of corporate and philanthropic scholarships available. Some are course specific, many are not. There are some listed below or you can visit the Undergraduate scholarship pages.

Abertay International Scholarship

This is an award of up to £12,000 for prospective international undergraduate students.

Abertay rUK Scholarship

This is a £4000 award for prospective undergraduate students applying from England, Wales or Northern Ireland.

The Robert Reid Bursary

Two £1,000 awards for students who have overcome challenges to attend university.

Choose Your Path

Around 70% of our students get involved with summer work placements in the engineering sector through connections they’ve made from either their work placements or from networking. In fact, 25% of students go on to full-time employment with their work placement provider. It’s a unique opportunity that leads to almost 100% employment after university.

Exciting opportunities exist for graduates from this programme, with employment prospects in:

  • Professional consulting engineers
  • Major civil and environmental engineering contractors
  • Specialist project management organisations
  • Local authorities (municipalities), public and private Utilities
  • Transportation organisations

 

Careers

Civil and environmental engineering offers the opportunity for a versatile career – and this degree will provide you with all the tools you need.

The programme will provide you with relevant and valuable work experience in a civil engineering / construction organisation, that furnishes you with the opportunity to practice skills, test careers and ensure your employability.

 

Female engineering student holding 2 circular objects

Industry Links

In addition, Abertay University also enjoys strong links with a number of industry partners, including:

  • Transport Scotland
  • Balfour Beatty
  • Sweco
  • BAM
  • BEAR Scotland
Abertay's Civil Engineering Workshop.

20000

The annual shortfall of engineering graduates in the UK

#1

We're the TOP civil engineering degree in Scotland

£26K

Engineering graduate salaries are well above the all-subject average of £22k

Get inspired

Find out what some of our Civil Engineering graduates are doing now

A photo of Graham Lawson smiling with his arms folded. He's standing in front of a white door.

Graham Lawson

Graeme is a Senior Engineer for housing developer, Persimmon Homes.

Find out more

Belinda Oldfield

Belinda is responsible for all of Scottish Water’s revenue for 2.5million households and approximately 160,000 businesses in Scotland.

Find out more

Steven Traynor in a suit standing in front of Abertay University's Kydd building

Steven Traynor

Steven's team is responsible for delivering a Construction Framework worth almost £1bn.

Find out more

Unistats

Unistats collates comparable information in areas students have identified as important in making decisions about what and where to study. The core information it contains is called the Unistats dataset (formerly the Key Information Set (KIS)).