BSc (Hons) Computer Science

Gain a rock-solid foundation in computer science. Learn the deep critical thinking, maths, and programming skills you'll use every day at work. Ranked TOP among Scottish Modern Universities for overall course satisfaction (Computing, NSS 2023).

Course detail

Start Date

September

Duration

4 years (full-time)

Award Title

BSc (Hons)

UCAS Code

G401

Why study Computer Science at Abertay?

Embark on an exciting journey with this dynamic degree, where you'll gain a rock-solid foundation in computer science and learn how to seamlessly apply theory in real-world scenarios. Uncover the very essence of computer science: problem-solving.

You'll master the art of problem-solving and cultivate robust software development skills, putting you on the path to becoming an in-demand computing professional ready for any workplace challenge. 

You’ll design, develop and analyse software and hardware, solving business related problems as you learn. With guest lectures and industry mentored projects, you’ll get plenty of real-world contact to help put your expertise into practice. 

Watch the video with Dr Salma ElSayed, the Programme Leader for BSc (Hons) Computer Science, and find out why studying here at Abertay is a great move. 

 

Study Artificial Intelligence and more

This vocational course teaches you the deep critical thinking, maths and programming skills that you’ll use every day at work. Alongside this, you'll gain the confidence and ability to communicate professionally with all kinds of audiences.

You'll cover topics such as:  

  • Artificial Intelligence (AI).

  • Green Computing.

  • Programming in C++.

  • Hardware Architecture and Operating Systems.

  • Software Engineering.

  • Data Structures and Algorithms.

  • Large Language Models (LLMs).

Teamwork and good communication are a crucial part of this degree. You’ll define, plan, design, implement and document software development projects from start to finish - both individually and as part of a team.

When you graduate you will be career-ready, and highly sought after to work in software developer or systems analyst roles.

Undergraduate Open Days

Visit our Dundee campus and find your place at Abertay University.

Our 2024 undergraduate Open Days will be held on ...

  • Saturday 28 September 2024

  • Saturday 2 November 2024

... and you're invited!

Click below to book your place. 

BOOK AN OPEN DAY

Your career journey starts here

Computers are ubiquitous in the modern world. They're used in all aspects of life and are constantly evolving.

We aim to provide you with all the knowledge and skills to enter the workplace with confidence. Potential career options include:

  • AI Engineer.

  • Software Developer.

  • Systems Analyst.

  • IT Project Manager.

  • Systems Architect.

  • UX Designer.

Division of Cybersecurity Alumni

Group of students working in Abertay Universities Ethical Hacking Laboratory

State-of-the-art computing

We know just how fast technology moves, so along the way you’ll have access to state-of-the-art facilities depending on the options you choose.

The Emergent Technology Centre (ETC) - a dedicated facility for basic and applied computing research. This includes a UX lab, a development studio, a student project lab, and a testbed for IoT devices.

The 5G Testbed - an R&D platform for 5G applied research in areas like sensor nets, the Internet of Things (IoT), Industrial IoT (iIoT), mobile computing, smart cities, ubiquitous computing and cybersecurity.

female using a Desktop computer

About your modules

All modules shown are indicative and reflect course content for the current academic year. Modules are reviewed annually and may be subject to change. If you receive an offer to study with us we will send you a Programme document  that sets out exactly which modules you can expect to take as part of your Abertay University degree programme. Please see Terms and Conditions for more information.

Modules

Year 1 Core Modules

You must study and pass all six core modules

Brief description

Introduction to the core ideas of computer architecture. Build a mental model of the functioning of a typical computer system that can be used to reason about system (hardware/software) behaviour - and be extended in later modules.

Indicative content:

  • Computer architecture: Principal low-level components (logic gates, logic blocks) and what they do, bus interconnections, memory, storage devices.
  • Data representation: Bits, integers, floating and fixed point, text, colours, bitmaps, bitwise operations.
  • Machine instructions: The von Neumann architecture, a modern CPU, arithmetic, control flow, the stack.
  • Operating systems: Userspace and kernelspace, drivers, scheduling, memory management, filesystems, use of operating systems (e.g. Linux) to support simple system management, OS level security concepts.

Brief description

Introduction to Computer Networks through an analysis of basic networking fundamentals.

Indicative content:

  • Networking fundamentals: Architecture: circuit and packet switched networks; copper, fibre and wireless media. Effects of media on bandwidth and data throughput. Review of hubs, switches and routers and their advantages/disadvantages in a network configuration e.g. Ethernet and data link layer.
  • Network layers: Data segmentation and encapsulation. Use of MAC and IP addresses by network switches and routers. TCP and UDP protocols. Class based networks, allocation of IP address and their identification. Need for and determination of subnets and subnet masks.
  • Network models, protocols, applications: OSI model vs TCP/IP. Protocols and applications related to Application layer, Transport layer, Network layer, Data link layer, and Physical layer and their functionalities.
  • Networking analysis: Analysis of network traffic. Application of tools used to analyse communication on local networks. Understanding network traffic. Methods of analysing network convesations.
  • Application of network knowledge: Designing computer networks. Network hardware, logistical and routing considerations. Troubleshooting networks. Building network applications, creating networking software that use sockets to communicate.

Brief description

Gain the ability to plan, develop and test object-oriented computer programs for a range of routine programming problems.

Indicative content:

  • Object oriented program development: Use an object-oriented program development environment, creating source code, compilation, linking, execution de−bugging and development.
  • Introduction to Object Orientation: Read, understand and modify small object-oriented programs.
  • Programming constructs: Make use of declarations, data types, assignment, operators, selection, iteration and functions for a range of programming problems.
  • Aggregate types: Arrays and algorithms - increased programming power. Storage, access and direct access to computer memory (pointers). Classes and structs. 
  • Program development and testing: Pseudo-code and step-wise refinement, use of functions as program units for organisation and efficiency.

Brief description

This module complements earlier programming modules by introducing - in a practical rather than theoretical way - some of the fundamental ideas of software engineering to develop and communicate designs for small and large scale software systems.

Indicative content:

  • Problem-solving: Capturing requirements, general problem-solving techniques, testing, the idea of a non-programming language.
  • Classes and Objects: Develop software using class defintions, methods, data, constructors and instantiation. Create basic class inheritance structures within a sofware solution using two classes. 
  • Security: Encapsulating objects using public and private access modifiers. Constructors.
  • OO analysis design and implementation: Identify objects in a system and structure data and information in class definitions. Mapping object-oriented design principles to programming constructs.
  • Abstraction: Understand how to work with complexity by using code abstraction, code blocks and control flows.
  • Class modelling: Introduction to UML class diagrams.
  • Data design – an OO approach: Modelling using object-oriented techniques, drawing informal and formal diagrams to describe information and behaviour (including UML), design patterns.
  • Data design – a relational approach: Modelling using relational techniques, theoretical and practical design concerns, constructing and querying a database using basic SQL Modelling using relational techniques, theoretical and practical design concerns, constructing and querying a database using basic SQL.

Brief description

Learn to contextualise software development within other subjects in computing, particularly computer security and web development. Within a wider context, consider and discuss social, ethical, professional and legal aspects.

Indicative content:

  • Introduction: The pace of change; impact of modern technology on society and individuals; ethical guidelines for computer professionals - codes of conduct.
  • Computer Crime: Definition; examples including malware, hacking, identity theft, social engineering, phishing etc.
  • Computer Security: Threats and Vulnerabilities; the current state of computer security; securing networks, accounts and devices. Human aspects of cybersecurity.
  • Design components: Colour, Perception.
  • Privacy in the information Society: Privacy principles, policies and risks; authentication and privacy; privacy on the web; email security; privacy impacts of emerging technologies (e.g. cloud, VoIP, RFC); the privacy/ accountability dilemma.
  • Legal Issues: Data Protection Act, Computer Misuse Act, Copyright and Intellectual Property, GDPR.
  • Access, Accessibility and Usability: The digital divide; Enabling and Disabling through technology; accessibility standards; usability fundamentals. Usability vs Security.
  • Internet Fundamentals and Web Standards: HTTP and related protocols; benefits of web standards; W3C, Accessibility; regulating internet content; whose laws rule the web?
  • Web Development Fundamentals: Fundamentals of Mark up; structural elements; HTML5 and CSS; navigation; organising information; working with data stores.
  • Design for the future: Responsive web design.

Brief description

The purpose of this module is to enable you to recognise the steps you need to take to ensure you achieve academic success.

Indicative content

  • The new challenge of studying in HE: Expectations of a student in higher education.
  • Successful student behaviours: Academic excellence is only part of a successful university experience.  Find out more about wider integration through your University community.
  • Sense of purpose and Abertay attributes: Recognising the opportunity that university offers and starting to think about where this might lead and how you might determine that direction, whether that be career or further study.
  • Reflections on personal strengths and challenges: Preparatory work to consider what those strengths and challenges might be.
  • Formative Diagnostic engagement: Diagnostic tool can be taken on multiple occasions as student engages with developmental process.
  • Growth and moving forward: How could you act upon this information?  What resources are available to support your development?
  • Action planning: How to create an action plan and measure your success in meeting it
  • Summative assessment: Create action plan and identify schedule of microcredentials to study in year one.

Year 1 MySuccess Modules - Term 2

You must study and pass three MySuccess modules of your choosing

Brief description 

Learn to understand the fundamentals of writing at university, including how to find the specific language for your subject and how to “sound academic” when you write. 

Indicative content

  • Finding the right words: Why having a big vocabulary is vital if you want to be a good writer. Introduction to the Academic Word List. How to build your subject vocabulary
  • Learning the style: What lecturers mean by “academic style”. How to learn the rules of academic writing. Why these vary in different subjects and different assignments
  • The connection between the right language and avoiding plagiarism: What we mean by “the right language” in writing. Some fundamental rules you need to remember. How this helps you to paraphrase (and why that’s vital). 
  • Being a guide for your reader: Why a clear structure is key to a good grade. How to lead your reader through your writing. How to make your writing “flow”.
  • Persuading your reader you’re right: Why all academic writing is persuasive writing. The importance of evidence. How to present your arguments and back them up

Brief description 

An introduction to the key digital capabilities you need for your studies. 

Indicative content

  • Map current skills: Identify current strengths against a range of digital skills students will need at university and are also sought by employers.  Create a plan to develop your digital skills journey using an online platform.
  • Digital Learning Environment: Identify tools including assistive technologies which will help you organise your learning and ensure your devices are efficient and secure.
  • Institutional Systems: Understand how to engage with institutional tools such as MyLearningSpace, MS Teams, OASIS, MyAbertay Dashboard and Calendar
  • Digital Communication and Collaboration: Use different types of online communication to communicate with other students and your lecturers.  Understand how learning networks are used professionally.
  • Digital Learning and Development: Understand how to develop skills in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Forms and OneDrive skills to an advanced level by gaining software provider accreditation.
  • Digital Creativity and Problem solving: Use appropriate tools to create and edit digital content, including multimedia while respecting copyright. 
  • Digital Identity: Identify effective use of social media to present a positive digital identify. 

Brief description 

Take a guided tour of our location, heritage, culture, industry and innovations, find out how you can get involved, and what’s on our horizon.

Indicative content

  • Location: We will explore the geography that makes Dundee’s setting “probably more extraordinary than any other city in the UK. It is about as ideal – ludicrously ideal – as any setting could be.” – Stephen Fry. Did you know there is an extinct volcano in the city centre? and why our city is known as #SunnyDundee (one of the sunniest cities in Scotland)… It’s all down to geography…
  • Heritage:  The 3 ‘J’s – Jute, jam and journalism… the industrial foundations of modern Dundee – our link with the world through international trade (e.g. Dundee does not grow oranges – so how did we get to be famous for our Dundee marmalade?). Dennis the menace and his Beano pals will have a tale to tell you … and the McManus galleries hold many a local secret for you to uncover (find the Tay Whale).
  • Industry and innovation: A city of innovation and reinvention… with lots of innovation over the centuries in Dundee, we will explore the Recent: Biomed, computer games… And the Future: MSIP, Eden project, E-Games arena. One of the first places in the UK to have Green health prescriptions (and we have lots of parks!)
  • Culture: Take a ‘virtual’ trip to Antarctica on RRS Discovery, explore the history of industry at Verdant works, marvel at the displays in the V&A, dance at the Dundee rep, soak in culture at Dundee Contemporary Arts, and marvel at developments in medicine, engineering, environment and more at Dundee science centre…
  • Take part: Dundee is a friendly city, we say hello we help each other, we have lots of communities large and small. Discover how Abertay fits into the city and how you can too.

Brief description 

Take the first step on your journey towards becoming an independent, confident and accomplished information literate student in your chosen subject area, gaining an understanding of the fundamental skills you will need for research both at University and in lifelong learning.

Indicative content

  • Getting started: Identifying the ‘knowledge gap’ and the information needed to fill it: why information literacy matters. 
  • Understanding Information sources: How scholarly information is generated and disseminated; key characteristics of different information types (e.g. print/electronic, primary/ secondary, bibliographic/full-text, open access/paywall).
  • Searching for information: Planning, using and refining appropriate search strategies; online search tools (Google vs specialist services); using a range of web and database search functionality (e.g. truncation, phrasing, filters)
  • Evaluating information: Using appropriate quality criteria to critically evaluate information from any source to determine authority and bias.
  • Referencing: Understanding what is meant by academic integrity, plagiarism and the need for appropriate referencing; creating reference lists and in-text citations; use of referencing tools to manage information.

Brief description 

Learn how to present and persuade a targeted audience that an idea is beneficial – presenting a clear and well-supported message or point of view to influence a decision.

Indicative content

  • What is visual communication and why is it important? Overview of forms of visual communication as a tool to convey an idea, concept, design thinking or project and why it is important to present in a simple and inspirational way to deliver impact to a chosen target audience.
  • Let’s go mood boarding! How to gather, distil and present focused visual information for an idea, concept, design thinking or project on a mood board in a simple and engaging format to a chosen target audience.
  • What is persuasive writing and why is it important? Overview of structuring written communication to persuasively present a clear and well supported idea or point of view (evidence) including counter views to influence a decision by a target audience.

Brief description 

Gain an early opportunity to start planning your personal and career development for your life beyond University. 

Indicative content

  • The new challenge of knowing the future now: What will the future look like for me and what can I do to prepare? Videos, presentations and interactive activities sessions on a range of topics and concepts to help provide a wider context for self-development.
  • Who am I? Use of a range online interactive online self-assessment tools and activities used to create your own personal profile and benchmark your own career readiness.
  • My current personal profile and my future-(professional) self:  Using results and data from self-assessment tools to create personal profile. You're Introduced to the Career Management Cycle model as an approach to personal development, interactive self-reflection and for planning suitable personal goals. 
  • Mind the Gap: Use of positive case studies from previous students/graduates. (Where are they now?) To help inspire and raise your career aspirations. 
  • Growth and moving forward: Set out your next steps based on a range of opportunities available to do so. 
  • Decoding the jargon: Decode the jargon terms used in education/employment/work /careers. 
  • Action planning: Use of SMART technique in setting personal goals.

Brief description 

Experience first-hand what Abertay has to offer and further embed yourself as a member of the Abertay community.

Indicative content

  • Student Representation: The student voice is important to both us and the University. We value your opinions, and our reps allow us to hear it. Learn all about our Class reps, Division reps and Community reps. The University also delivers the Lead Voices, which recruits students to advocate the voices of students belonging to protected characteristics.
  • Societies: Societies are student led and student organised. Find out more about societies: what they do, the committee structure, society council and the skills you can gain from being part of a society. If you don'tt see something you like, then you can learn how to create a society of your own.
  • Sports: Whether you're interested in competitive level or looking for a social activity, there are a variety of sports clubs to join. Learn about our different sports clubs, the Sports Union, their committees and physical activities the University has to offer. There are several links between physical activity and wellbeing including mental health which will also be discussed.
  • Peer Mentoring: The Abertay Peer Mentoring programme connects students to other students. Abertay Mentors are experienced students who are keen to support the academic and personal success of others.
  • Enterprise: Bell Street Ventures is the University’s centre for enterprise who offer workshops, resources and consultation. Open to students and graduates whether you want to start a business, change the world or choose who you want to work with as a freelancer.

Brief description 

Gain the knowledge and awareness of techniques and behaviours that are known to positively influence ongoing wellbeing.

Indicative content

  • Course overview: Introduction to the course and to the underpinning theory.
  • Connecting: Consideration of the value of building strong social relationships and Identifying ways of becoming more connected at Abertay and within local communities.
  • Being active: Highlighting the benefits of becoming physically active and providing examples of how this might be achieved from different starting points and circumstances.
  • Taking notice: Introducing useful techniques such as mindfulness and grounding.
  • Learning: Explaining the link between learning and wellbeing and showcasing a range of opportunities open to Abertay students.
  • Giving: Exploring the value of giving in different contexts and flagging options as an Abertay student, including peer mentoring, Student Association involvement and volunteering opportunities.
  • Course summary and next steps: Creating an action plan to adopt the behaviours above.
  • Summative assessment: An online quiz structured around the five elements above.

 

Year 2 Core Modules

You must study and pass all five core modules​

Brief description

Build on your knowledge of programming taught in earlier modules (e.g. arrays, structures, simple collections). Gain an introduction to the standard data structures and algorithms that form the core of algorithmic thought in computer science and to the idea of reasoning about the behaviour and performance of a computer program.

Indicative content

  • Reasoning about performance: The idea of an algorithm, time and space complexity, abstract data types.
  • Basic data structures: Linked lists, stacks, queues, hash tables.
  • Sorting and searching: Exhaustive and binary search, common sorting algorithms.
  • Trees: Simple trees, tree search algorithms, tree representations (XML, JSON).
  • Graphs: Simple and directed graphs, graph algorithms.

Brief description

The design and implementation of object-oriented software and relational databases. In both contexts,  review existing designs, develop your own to meet stated requirements, critically evaluate them and use them to create example implementations.

Indicative content

  • Entity relationship (ER) modelling: Identifying entities; 1-1, 1-many and many-many relationships; design notation; ER in OO software and database design.
  • Relational database design: Using primary and foreign keys to realise 1-1 and 1-many relationships; link tables for many-many relationships; designing to meet application data requirements; normalisation.
  • SQL: SQL as a programming language; basic relational algebra; expressing unions and joins; selecting, extracting, editing and inserting data; writing SQL to meet functional requirements.
  • OO software and SQL: Including SQL into OO software; integrating OO software and database designs; realising designs in code.
  • Development methodologies: The role of a methodology; review different methodologies such as waterfall, RAD, agile, TDD; appraise the role of design within different methodologies.

Brief description

This module builds on Data Structures and Algorithms 1 by introducing students to parallel programming on shared memory and GPU architectures and the design techniques underpinning parallel applications, using a range of case studies drawn from typical real-world applications.

Indicative content

  • Parallel programming: Why to parallelise, parallelism and concurrency, Amdahl's law, high-level approaches to parallelisation, parallel design.
  • Low-level programming with threads: Starting and joining threads, sharing data safely, mutual exclusion, synchronisation objects, lock-free.
  • High-level parallel programming: Task-based parallelism, message-passing parallelism, data-parallel problems, exploiting locality programming.
  • Instruction-level parallelism: SIMD instructions, automatic vectorisation.
  • GPGPU: GPU architectures, appropriate algorithms for GPUs, GPU profiling.
  • Parallel Patterns: Design patterns for parallel and concurrent programming. Awareness of common sorting, numerical, image processing and searching and optimization algorithms and how they can benefit from parallelisation.

Brief description

Generic concepts for the optimisation of interactions between a user and computing systems and service, and how these interactions can be evaluated. Learn about research methods, quantitative and qualitative data analysis, and ethics in the data gathering process, as well as interface design. Explore aspects of usability and accessibility.

Indicative content

  • Designing Experiments: Creating and building small experiments that relate to aspects of computing.
  • Usability and Accessibility: Developing interfaces that are usable and accessible under consideration of platform.
  • Professional and Ethical Issues: Consideration of issues that affect professionalism and ethical procedures in computing industries.
  • Data Analysis and Evaluation: Quantitative and qualitative data analysis methods.

Brief description

Dynamic web applications, through client-side and server side internet development on a full-stack platform.

Indicative content

  • Web standards: Application of HTML5 and CSS to develop responsive designs.
  • Client-side technologies: Implementation of JavaScript, libraries, and frameworks to create effective user interfaces within an appropriate development practice and methodology.
  • Design techniques: Appropriate techniques for dynamic web applications.
  • Data persistence: The use of relevant data persistence and consideration of appropriate use.
  • Server-side scripting technologies: Using server-side technologies to provide functionality. Consideration of the processes involved, and the benefits/drawbacks of processing on the server.
  • Security and legal issues: Consider legal and security issues including privacy, transparency, data protection, GDPR, authorisation and validation.
  • Practical aspects of security: Appropriate use of network protocols, secure programming, and testing strategies.

Year 2 Microcredentials - Term 2

If you are a Direct Entrant (new student) to this year of study and have not previously taken module ABE101, then you MUST take ABE201 as part of your Microcredential selection. If you have previously taken ABE101 then you are NOT permitted to take ABE201.

Instructions: Please choose a total of TWENTY credits of microcredential (ABE) modules.

Brief description

Throughout the microcredential you will become familiar with university systems (including the virtual learning environment), consider what attributes make a successful student and develop key successful student habits.

Indicative content

  • Navigating Abertay Systems: Be introduced to and understand how to engage with Abertay systems and tools such as MyLearningSpace, MS Teams, OASIS, MyAbertay etc.
  • Expectations of University and You: Explore your own and the universities expectations of you and of the university; Consider the code of conduct; independent learning; blended learning; how university is structured; health and safety; and the Abertay attributes.
  • Understanding and Searching Information: How scholarly information is generated and disseminated, key characteristics of different information types. Planning, using, and refining appropriate search strategies; online search tools; using a range of web and database search functionality. 
  • Successful Student Behaviours: Develop strategies to key successful student behaviours including Defeating Procrastination, Time Management, Notetaking and preparing for classes, Growth Mindset, Accessing student support and opportunities.
  • Referencing: Understand what is meant by academic integrity, plagiarism, and the need for appropriate referencing; creating reference lists and in-text citations; use of referencing tools to manage information.
  • Sounding Academic: Explore what lecturers mean by “academic style” and “the right language”; Understand what is meant by and how to learn the rules of academic writing characteristics. Consider how this differs between college and university; Learn how to paraphrase. Explore how assessments, marking and feedback works at university.
  • Evaluating Information: Using appropriate quality criteria to critically evaluate information from any source to determine authority and bias.

Brief description

This microcredential provides you with the space and time to develop your skills in designing, planning, delivering, and showcasing an artefact responding to the societal issue. The microcredential is flexible and you will have a choice of what and how you create your response.

Indicative content

  • The Big Issue: You will be introduced to the big society issue that will be the focus of your artefact response. Learning materials available will help you consider your response to the challenge.
  • Developing Ideas: You will think creatively as to how you will respond to the big issue. You will consider your intended artefact aims, outcomes and target audience. 
  • Responding to the Challenge: Resources and guidance will be available as you respond to the challenge and create your artefact.
  • Preparing for the Showcase: Guidance will be available on how best to showcase your artefact for the assessment. You will develop your presentation skills to support you in showcasing the artefact. 
  • Showcase Event: You will attend a showcase event and present your artefact.

Brief description

You will discuss a range of anti-racist approaches and how they apply within the context of professional communications. You will examine case studies and scenarios to identify the nature of bias in society explore ways to be anti-racist especially in professional communications.

Indicative content

  • Racial Bias in Society: Using case studies and scenarios to discuss various forms of racism in society, you will explore the need for anti-racist practice in professional communications. 
  • Classification of Anti-Racist Practice: This section compares different anti-racists approaches applied across several contexts. You will discuss the challenges and benefits of each approach. You will identify barriers to implementation of anti-racist practice.
  • Discuss Anti-Racist Approaches for Successful Professional Communications: You will be introduced to various communications frameworks (e.g. the humanity-centric framework) and will explore scenarios for the application of these frameworks in a range of professional contexts.
  • Embedding Anti-Racism in Digital and Social Media Communications: How can you discuss matters of race and anti-racism on digital and social media while maintaining a professional persona. We will examine cases for best practices and explore ways to avoid bigoted language in digital communications. 

Brief description

In this module you will study two ways of analysing language: (i) a basic introduction to conversation analysis and discourse analysis as applied to ordinary talk/texting, and (ii) and introduction text mining, based on identifying patterns and developing insights from text-based data available on the Internet (e.g., social media data, online texts, online reviews etc).

Indicative content

  • Conversation Analysis and Talk and Text as Action: A brief overview of the CA focus on language as action; an examination of how people talk in terms of questions, answers, invitations, excuses, justifications etc.; an examination of texting, emojis, misunderstandings.
  • Text Mining: Introduction to text mining and its uses in a social sciences and business context; Online data sources; The text mining process: data collection, pre-processing and analysis; effectively communicating and visualising insights from textual data.

Brief description

By the end of this microcredential, you will be able to evaluate and select machine learning algorithms and AWS services to be appropriately applied to different business problems.

Indicative content

  • Introduction to Machine Learning: What is ML? ML process, business problem solved with ML, ML tools, Amazon SageMaker, ML challenges, supervised learning (regression, classification), unsupervised learning (clustering, dimensionality reduction), reinforcement learning, etc.
  • Implementing a ML pipeline using Amazon Sage Maker: Formulating ML problems, collecting and securing data, extracting, transferring and loading data, evaluating your data, finding corelation, feature engineering, data cleaning, dealing with outliers, training, deployment, performance evaluation, hyperparameters and model tuning.
  • Forecasting: Time series analysis, Amazon Forecast, Implementing a forecast model, Stock Predictions.
  • Computer Vision: Facial Recognition, Image and Video Analysis, Dataset Preparation.
  • Natural Language Processing: Amazon Comprehend, Polly, Translate, and Lex, Creating a chatbot, Alexa, etc.

Brief description

This online module will support you to get familiar with sustainability and introduce you to tools that can help you to understand and reduce your climate impact. By increasing your sustainability self-awareness, you will be able to make a positive difference in your own life, and in the organisations and communities around you.

Indicative content

  • What is sustainability and how is it linked to Climate Change?: We define sustainability, enhancing understanding of the links between society, economy, and environment. Climate change is explained and linked to sustainability. We provide clear accessible information about the reliable science of climate change. We describe the need efforts towards limiting human-induced global warming (limiting cumulative CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions). 
  • Global Sustainability: We introduce the United Nations Sustainability Goals (SDGs). The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership. They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests. 
  • Personal Sustainability: The WWF environmental footprint tool is a great way to start your personal sustainability journey. The planet is in crisis - from climate change to the pollution in our oceans and devastation of our forests. It's up to all of us to fix it. Take your first step with our environmental footprint calculator. 
  • Community Sustainability and Climate Resilience: Community climate resilience comes in many forms. In this topic we introduce ideas which can provide multiple benefits of people, planet, and prosperity. We showcase inspiring examples whereby working with natural processes (Biophilic design, blue and green infrastructure) we can connect people with nature to improve their well-being and quality of life, whilst simultaneously tackling climate change and storing carbon.
  • Global Solutions: What is the world doing about it? What impact do Global Climate and Biodiversity agreements (COP26 etc) really have? What’s happening here? Where are the challenges and the good news stories? We showcase positive initiatives focussed on progress.

Brief description

By the end of the module, you will know more about key aspects of nutrition and health and be better equipped to identify and tackle the barriers that prevent you from eating well.

Indicative content

  • Healthy eating on a budget: This topic will show you that healthy eating doesn’t have to be expensive! You will be given basic nutritional knowledge, as well as skills and practical tips to be able to eat a healthy diet on a budget. You will then be able to develop your own menu and share it with your peers, so you learn from us as well as from each other.
  • Prebiotics, probiotics and health: You will learn about the importance of our microbiota on health, and how what we eat can modulate it. You will be provided with cooking tips and will be able to develop your own fermented foods for better gut health.
  • Fat or sugar, which is worse?: You may have heard that fats are bad for our health, or perhaps you have heard it is all about the sugars? You will learn about the role of both sugars and fats in our diet; what makes them good or bad for health and the science behind it. You will be given the tools to assess your own sugar and fat intake as well as tips to implement the changes you need to eat better. 
  • The British diet vs Mediterranean diet: What is a Mediterranean diet and what are its real benefits? Is it just a diet or a pattern? Can we get the same benefits as those living in Mediterranean countries? In this topic, you will explore how feasible it is for us to adopt the Mediterranean diet and lifestyle, considering the seasonality of ingredients as well as sustainability. 
  • What drives our food choices?: How healthy do you think your diet is? Do you find it easy to eat well? With this topic you will become more aware of our obesogenic environment, of how the food industry talks to us, and how the media report nutritional claims. You will learn to look more closely and more critically at your environment, so you can make healthier decisions.

Brief description

This microcredential will help you to refine your current writing skills through the analysis and discussion of a range of texts and exercises, enabling you to then apply these techniques to assignments for your other modules.

Indicative content

  • Speaking the language: How to develop your academic and professional vocabulary: understanding the genre; understanding your reader’s expectations.
  • Meeting expectations: Why different assignments have different requirements: decoding instructions; selecting appropriate writing techniques.
  • Tightening up the nuts and bolts: How to improve your writing accuracy: reviewing key grammar and punctuation issues; improving your editing and proofreading.
  • Standing on the shoulders of giants: How to borrow from the greats: reviewing the principles of citing sources; using writing techniques to incorporate research into writing.

Brief description

This module will help you develop a better understanding of the difference between media reporting and scientific evaluation. It will equip you with the skills to look beyond sensational stories related to human behaviour and dig deeper into a topic area to validate the evidence.

Indicative content

  • Paranormal Beliefs and Experiences: Is Extrasensory Perception Real? Is there really evidence that we can predict the future?
  • Myths about the Brain: Can repressed memories be recovered in therapy? How easily are false memories created? What are the implications for the justice system? 
  • Myths about our Mind and Body: Is the key to success in everyday life simply a case of posing like a powerful superhero? 
  • Myths about Language: Does being bilingual make you smarter and keep your brain younger? Are bilingual people less likely to get dementia as a result of this lifelong brain training?

Brief description

Through this microcredential you will gain an insight into what the world of work may look like in the (near) future. This includes developing a knowledge of how the economy and labour market evolves and why individual skills-sets and employability are so important and intrinsically linked to this process.

Indicative content

  • The future of work: What will the future of work look like? What is used to predict how the world or work will change? Can the future of the economy and of work be accurately predicted? 
  • Key factors that influence change: Identifying some of the key factors that influence how the world of work and our economy evolves and changes.
  • The key role of skills and personal employability: The emergence and decline of skills: skills are fundamental to the economy (and graduate employers). What skills will be most in demand and/or be most valuable to our economy in future and why? Understand the importance of skills to the economy (and to graduate employers) at both the macro and micro level. Know what specific new skills are emerging and becoming more valuable and sought after, (as others are in decline) for our modern economy and graduate labour market. 
  • Labour market information - what is it for?: Labour market Information is hugely important to our understanding of our economy at any given time: and also, in looking at the present and past to help predict future growth, opportunities, shortages and skills gaps. Recognise the importance of key Labour Market Information (LMI). Have the ability to source and use key Labour Market Information (LMI). Understand how to use accurate Labour Market Information as a tool to help their own personal development and future career planning. 
  • What now?: Some help and steer – suggestions to you may wish to use your new knowledge and insight to help with your own career aspirations, planning and personal/professional development while at university.

Brief description

Some businesses have the sole focus of making money whereas others exist to also make a difference. Social enterprises are becoming more popular, and recognisable, and are making an impact across the world. From supporting the homeless, to giving waste products a second life, social enterprises are fighting for various causes. 

Indicative content

  • What is a social enterprise and how does it function?: What the definition of a social enterprise is with examples from different sectors.
  • How do social enterprises identify problems to tackle?: How social enterprises decide on what they will tackle and how they will do it. 
  • How do you gather evidence that there is a problem requiring a solution?: Way in which you can gather evidence and data to validate the idea for a social enterprise. Determining needs and wants within a category. 
  • How to identify skills and knowledge gaps: Understanding the skillsets within a founding team to fulfil the tasks required to start a social enterprise. 
  • How to understand the problem you are trying to solve: Knowing the problem, you are trying to solve and how this effects the target customers the social enterprise is aimed at. Looking at the issues in a customer-focussed way. 
  • How to develop a social impact plan: What is involved in a social impact plan and how to put one together. 

Brief description

This module will introduce you to the study of AI and Society. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a set of technologies and concepts and can be understood as using computers and software to denote problem-solving capacities and knowledge acquisition (intelligence) which otherwise we believe only belongs to natural beings such as humans.

Indicative content

  • Introduction to the core concepts: A brief introduction to the concepts of “artificial”, “intelligence” and “society”. 
  • Introduction to the problem of AI and Society: A discussion of where the problem of the impact of AI on Society comes from, presentation of some of the original debates and examples.
  • Contemporary debates: A discussion of the contemporary debates about the impact of AI on Society, with examples.

Brief description

What is Artificial Intelligence (AI) and how has it shaped our past and present? These are questions we will explore on a guided tour of AI from the past to the present and the future. You will develop a better understanding of what AI is and isn’t.

Indicative content

  • Historical AI: Tracing the historical development of “traditional” AI systems including aircraft autopilots, expert systems, and accounting/financial software.
  • Current AI: Covering the contemporary generation of AI technologies in areas such as speech recognition (e.g., Alexa, Siri) and recommendation systems (e.g., Amazon, YouTube). Examples will be drawn from Health, Sport, Games, Engineering, Business, Law and Computing. 
  • Future AI: Exploring the limitations of today’s AI when it comes to general intelligence and contextual adaptation. Examples will be drawn from Health, Sport, Games, Engineering, Business, Law and Computing.
  • My AI: How AI will impact your future, and how you can use AI to help you achieve your career goals.  Reflection on how AI may inform your subject area going forward.

Brief description

This microcredential is aimed at you, if you have an interest in technology but are not experts. The microcredential will develop your digital safety and how to stay safe online.

Indicative content

  • Threat Landscape: Cyberattacks and online threats. System vulnerabilities. Social Engineering. Rights and computer laws.
  • Authentication: Password security. Biometrics. MFA and Password managers. Good practices for authentication.
  • Secure Communication: Web browser security. Certificates and trust. Effective encryption. Secure communication methods.
  • Personal Information Privacy: Information leakage. Personal information privacy and open-source intelligence. Device encryption and security. Security mindfulness.
  • Malware: Types of malware. Identifying malicious software. Malware propagation techniques. Malware removal and preventative measures.

Brief description

This microcredential will help you to develop and build your own confidence in applying numeracy skills in real world situations.

Indicative content

  • What is my GPA and how likely am I to get a First? (BASIC NUMERACY): Calculation and manipulation of data using Percentages, Indices (Powers), Roots, Probability, and simple equations. 
  • The power of prediction (GRAPHS): Straight line graphs, Gradients, Equations of a straight line, Intercepts. Drawing graphs - Linear equations, Distances between points. Simultaneous linear equations.  
  • Love a good puzzle (ALGEBRA): Changing subject of formulae. Factorisation - common factors, Difference of two squares, Trinomials. Solving simultaneous equations by Substitution and Elimination.
  • Advanced power of prediction (FUNCTIONS): Introduction to functions – Linear and Quadratic and solving quadratic equations. Factorising Quadratic equations.
  • Love a good triangle (TRIGONOMETRY): Trignometric functions - Sine, cosine and tangent. Trignometric formulae.

Brief description

In this microcredential, you will learn more about how digital media production professionals in the UK and China are working together to reduce barriers and identify new opportunities for collaboration and growth.

Indicative content

  • History and future of videogames in China: Focussing on the videogame sector as a case study of Chinese digital creative industries, how has the videogames market and industry developed in China, how is the Chinese videogames economy currently constituted, and what does the future hold?
  • Consumer trends and audience preferences: What is popular with audiences in China? What can we note about preferences in terms of narrative content, aesthetics, play styles etc. when compared with other markets?
  • Policy and regulation: What unique regulations or limitations are imposed on digital media within China, and what similarities are there with other national and transnational regulations? How is creative content development and publishing shaped by policy in China? What social and ethical challenges are presented by regulation, in China as well as in the UK?
  • Transnational working and co-production: How is digital creative content conceived, developed, and released by professionals working across borders? What are the challenges for small and independent creative studios, compared with multi-nationals with studios based in and outside China?
  • Publishing in China: How do digital media content like videogames make it to market in China? What processes and requirements must creative businesses be aware of, and how do developers find, connect to, and work with Chinese publishers? How to consumers in China access content, including on grey markets?
  • Challenges and success: Hear from UK and Chinese professionals on the China market, co-operation, the hurdles they cleared, and how they found success.

Brief description

Increasingly, the role of creativity in supporting and maintaining wellbeing is being researched and celebrated. This module will introduce you to the current theory in this area, as well as a range of creative resources shown to be helpful for both self-care and the support of others.

Indicative content

  • Why does creativity matter?: An introduction to why creativity matters when it comes to mental health.
  • Your brain on words: The place of stories in their various forms as a resource for wellbeing.
  • Engaging the senses: The potential of tools such as music and art for self-care.

Year 3 Core Modules

You must study and pass all six core modules

Brief description

Understand web application development by learning to create a database back-end and related server-side scripts. Learrn key concepts in web application development such as security and the need to develop a professional approach.

Indicative content:

  • Dynamic Site Basics: Write sites in HTML5 supported by CSS with a framework (eg. Bootstrap). Design and implement a database to store data in relational form; use PHP to extract data and deliver to the web page. Use of Javascript.
  • Database Management Systems - Server-Side Scripting: Examine issues such as concurrency and distributed database, OO, SQL and NoSQL. Using techniques to develop a structured approach to scripting. Use of prepared statements to enforce secure scripting. Understanding of the MVC architecture and separation of Model, View Controller. Use of API and Web Services to deliver content from the database.
  • Web Application Architectures - Security: Explore the 3−tier architecture and techniques of ensuring the separation of these tiers. Management of sites to allow interface changes without affecting the processing or database. Running through the module is the idea of secure coding. Main threats to the security of dynamic web applications and their data. Implement countermeasures to security threats within the context of differing types of application. 
  • Databases: Appropriate use of the Relational database model to store data for dynamic web sites. Alternative models including NoSQL database model.
  • JSON: JavaScript Object Model - Use of JSON as a data description language. Using JSON to deliver data between applications and servers. XML as an alternative.
  • State Management within HTTP: Use of Cookies in web development. Sessions and session management. Client Management and Application Management within PHP. Examination of different models from other technologies.
  • Client-Side Scripting: Review of Javascript as a client side language. Use of frameworks such as JQuery and AngularJS. Extension to Javascript server side development.
  • AJAX – RIA: Use of AJAX to develop web pages. Single page Web Applications using AJAX (RIA). Especially building Mobile Web Apps.
  • Internet of Things: Basic architecture of node / sensor domain, database and application domain. Creation of big data; upload to servers. Interrogation of servers to get information on the mobile device.
  • Mobile Internet Sites: Creation of mobile internet sites. Inclusion of special features that make the mobile more appropriate especially location.

Brief description

Working within a team, learn project management concepts to create a project proposal in a professional manner. Present your work in a client pitch to a stakeholder. The project briefs are drawn from industry and/or research based problems. Expect to: engage fully in your team role, communicate effectively with project stakeholders, contribute to the planning of the project, develop artefacts or prototypes, write associated documentation, and create and present the client pitch.

Indicative content:

  • Research: Background, competitors, prior art, project benefits.
  • Project: Project management concepts, Agile, Scrum.
  • Activities: Activities, deliverables and products.
  • Managing: Managing time and resources.
  • Identifying: Identifying and managing risks.
  • Quality considerations: Professional standards and quality assurance.
  • Develop: Develop artefacts, prototypes.
  • Interacting: Interacting with clients and team members.

Brief description

Understand software development practices which can be used to to develop applications for a range of mobile devices. Develop and evaluate the techniques used to implement mobile applications.

Indicative content:

  • Background to Smart and Mobile Development: Challenges in developing for smart including mobile devices. Development strategies, emulators and development environments. Use of the application abstraction to allow easier development.
  • User Interfaces: Development of interfaces for user-interaction including UI controls (buttons, forms) and underlying hardware controls (key presses, touch screen). Basic control of a mobile device using the high user interface. Use of commands and forms to gain data from the client. Use of low level features to display data to the user. Use of key presses to control real-time application.
  • Storage: Consideration of storage requirements for mobile devices. Saving and retrieving local and remote storage. Overview of database design. Use of remote databases, and how to use server side databases in an internet application. Use of internet based scripting to generate server side text for the client.
  • Location awareness: Utilising the network location capabilities of mobile devices to develop feature rich applications.
  • Telephony and SMS: Understanding the telephony and SMS stack on the mobile device and the use of APIs required for their access and control.
  • Communication Networks: Using short and long distance networks for communication and understanding of the limitations and benefits of each.
  • Security: Consider the security implications of mobile and smart platforms, how these can be exploited and development considerations to improve resilience.
  • Performance: Methods for testing the functionality and performance of applications on mobile devices.
  • Mobile Web Application Development: Explore and evaluate a range of mobile solution options from response design, jQuery mobile, and Javascript based applications.

Brief description

This module develops students’ understanding of how Machine Learning (ML) fits in Artificial Intelligence (AI) contexts. It observes how ML solutions became a vital component in the development of intelligent systems and how they can be utilised in certain types of problems within a wide spectrum of disciplines. The module introduces some of the many ML systems and relevant data concepts. Students are encouraged to select one technique to use in a given domain-specific application.

Indicative content:​

  • Learning Pipeline Conceptual view of the fundamentals and terminology of ML, and the ability of a machine to learn from its environment. The structure and components of the traditional machine learning pipeline: data, model, and evaluation.
  • Challenges of Applied ML The difficulties that arise with data-driven problems and the challenges accompanying an ML solution. Practical issues around data availability and representation, as well as characteristics of the applied model. The causes of overfitting and underfitting and possible remedies.
  • Big Data The challenge of the 21st century is ‘too much data and not enough analysis’. Explore the challenges and opportunities afforded by this phenomenon. How data availability can positively or negatively control/affect businesses.
  • Learning Paradigms The main approaches to learning and how a system can be supervised, unsupervised, or reinforced to produce a solution. The practicality of each paradigm and the constraints of its applicability.
  • ML Techniques Linear Regression, Reinforcement Learning, Artificial Neural Networks, Clustering Algorithms, Feature Identification with Singular Value Decomposition, Support Vector Machine, Random Forests, Decision Trees, Convolution Neural Network.
  • Data for ML The importance of data cleaning and pre-processing in ML context. Data representation. The curse of dimensionality. Feature selection and the impact of weak descriptors. Examples of datasets from different domains. Dimensionality reduction and Principal Component Analysis.
  • Applications of ML Real-world data-driven problems. Applications and uses of ML solutions. Analysis and discussion of case studies in different contexts.
  • Evaluation Metrics Analysis tools to assess the performance of a model. Understanding different metrics, what they describe the model, and their suitability in practice. Fitness function, Cost functions, False positive Rate, Receiver Operating Characteristics, Confusion Matrix. The Precision-Recall trade-off.
  • Model Enhancement Addressing poor performance and situations where data availability may not be enough. Methods to improve performance, assist convergence, and speed up parameter optimisation. Regularisation, Gradient Descent, Cross-validation. Statement on Teaching, Learning and Assessment.

Brief description

Complete a team based development project or other technical investigation project, which was planned and initially developed in the module: Professional Project Planning and Prototyping.

Indicative content:

  • Orientation: Consolidation of project teams and target problem.
  • Project principles: Required development methodologies during product production.
  • Documentation: The importance and content of a requirements specification and related documentation.
  • Design: The role of design and redesign during project development.
  • Implementation: Implementation issues and approaches.
  • Quality and Standards: Testing and evaluation methods and execution.
  • Communication: Oral and written communication and demonstration of software product.
  • Project planning and team working: Planning the project, organising a team, supporting colleagues, devising weekly plans, keeping progress records.
  • Self−evaluation: Personal contribution to team progress, logbook.

Brief description

Gain understanding and experience in design/programming within a software engineering context.

Indicative content:​

  • Software engineering (SE): What is SE? Application to development process; application to programming practices.
  • SE Development methodologies: Agile development; Waterfall Model; Continuous delivery.
  • Source control: Strategies; tools; version control systems (git).
  • Code development practices: Design concepts: Coupling and Cohesion; Continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD); Test-driven development (TDD).
  • Unified Modelling Language (UML): Use case diagrams; Sequence diagrams; Class diagrams; State-machine diagrams; Activity diagrams.
  • Patterns: Pattern catalogues; reviewing a pattern; strategy pattern; observer pattern and variants; pattern implementation.
  • Secure OO coding practices: Identifying coding vulnerabilities; types of exploits; protection through good programming practice.
  • Protecting against the user: Full input verification & validation; handling passwords and encryption.

Year 4 Core Modules

You must study and pass all five core modules

Brief description

Develop an understanding of enterprise systems engineering by learning to design and implement solutions. Critically appraise enterprise internet solutions involving scalability, customisation and security.

Indicative content

  • Architecting Scalable Enterprise Applications: Examine concepts that are required to architect and maintain scalable enterprise applications.
  • API Security: Implementing and securing Application Programming Interfaces (API)
  • Ensuring High Availability for your Enterprise Applications: Examine the core concepts of High Availability and how it can be deployed to ensure that enterprise applications are protected from failures.
  • Load Balancing Enterprise Applications: Concepts that are required to deploy load balancing for enterprise applications.
  • Working with Big Data: The core concepts of Big Data and how it is being used and deployed in enterprise environments.
  • Securing Enterprise Applications: The concepts required to secure enterprise applications and how to protect the data that is being used by the applications.
  • Distributed Databases in an Enterprise Environment. 
  • Provisioning Enterprise Servers.

Brief description

Explore system programming and development and gain an understanding of the security implications of such systems.

Indicative content

  • System Programming: C programming, compiler, linker and loader. Static and runtime analysis of binary files. System development kits, kernel headers and cross complier environments.
  • Hardware: ASIC, MCU, CPU, SOC, assembly, component security, pcb security, sniffing wire traffic, radio traffic, Types of communication (I2C, SPI, UART, RS232) and security challenges.
  • Operating systems: I/O Manager, Memory Manager, Scheduler, .s file, init file, boot loader, boot process, ROM, RAM, execution rings.
  • Kernels: Types of kernel, real time, unix, Windows, mac, linux, user space vs kernel space, shell, native applications, dll, registry/proc. Security landscape in user and kernel space.
  • Auditing and Debugging: User and kernel space debugging, Remote kernel debug setup, Analysis of precompiled binaries.
  • Loadable modules: Linker, stack and memory layout, Interrupts, IRQ table and priorities. Introduction to device drivers, Types of driver, lifecycle, portability. Security risks associated with loadable modules.
  • Cloud Platforms: Setup and use of cloud platforms such as AWS. Cloud platform utilisation fundamentals and business considerations.
  • Web Technologies: TCP/IP protocol with understanding of application protocols such as HTTP, FTP, SSH etc. Understand web server and common gateway interface (CGI).

Brief description

Undertake the practical and development work for a major, in-depth individual project in an aspect of your programme. Devise the idea for the project and proof of concept to support the specification of a well-researched project proposal document.in Term 1. Carry out and complete the main development work for the project in Term 2.

Indicative content

  • Investigation, Research and Selection: Initial investigation of project topic, Background research of project topic and Selection of project topic.
  • Evaluation: Methods of evaluating a project.
  • Legal, Social, Professional and Ethical Issues: Consideration of legal, social, ethical and professional issues.
  • Proposal: Production of a project proposal.
  • Project Ffeasibility and Proof of Concept: Demonstrate feasibility of project.
  • Self-directed problem solving, Originality and Creativity.
  • Self-Motivation, Initiative and Insight.
  • Software Design Skills.
  • Recording, Reporting and Communication Skills.
  • Employability and professional development.

Brief description

Present as a dissertation a major, in-depth individual project in an aspect of your programme. Normally you will devise the project, drawing from current industry and/or research based problem areas. Present your work in a structured and coherent manner which allows for critical and insightful review and evaluation of the project and artefact produced. Write the dissertation in academic style appropriate to your domain of study.

Indicative content

  • Introduction: Introduce the topic of the project and the problem area with and appropriate research question.
  • Investigate: Investigate previous work in the chosen project area and show how the work of the project relates to it.
  • Justify: Demonstrate a sound justification for the approach and methodology adopted.
  • Document: Document the output of the project with some originality.
  • Evaluate: Critically evaluate the output, using third party evaluation where appropriate, and recognise the strengths and limitations of the work.
  • Communicate: Communicate your work professionally in the required academic format/style. Demonstrate an ability for independent learning and linkage to future work and career aspirations.

Brief description

This module provides students with an opportunity to explore advanced topics in the computing domain that are used to enhance modern business practices, for example computer vision, natural language processing, data visualisation and infrastructure.

Indicative content

  • Visual Content Recognition: Introduction to computer vision applications and challenges. Improving businesses with Vision-aware Solutions. Convolution Neural Networks and Recognition. Popular Tools. Selected research paper(s) to read and discuss.
  • Visual Content Creation: Features for Image Data. Examples of Image Datasets. Generative models and content creation. Model Deception and DeepFake. Ethics and Dataset Bias. Selected research paper(s) to read and discuss.
  • Machine Learning for Text Analytics: Introduction to NLP applications and challenges. Improving businesses with Language-aware Data Products. Computational Linguistics. Popular Tools. Supervised and Unsupervised Models for Text Analytics. Selected research paper(s) to read and discuss.
  • Deep Learning for NLP: Features for Textual Data. Text Corpora and Lexical Resources. Convolution Neural Networks for Ngram Detection. Recurrent Neural Networks for Modelling Sequence. Selected research paper(s) to read and discuss.
  • Data Collection and Storage: Methods to collect data in various formats. Pre-processing of data to ensure integrity and formatting consistency. Storage mechanisms and infrastructures suited to the data format and velocity.
  • Data Processing Pipelines: Creation of software-based processes to handle the entire lifecycle of data in an automated fashion. Will cover on-premises and modern cloud techniques.
  • Approaches to Data Visualisation: Exploration of ways in which data can be presented in a visual manner. Software frameworks and libraries for data visualisation.
  • Business Intelligence: Tools and process which will allow data to be formed into information and visual presentations which provide value and inform strategic decisions in a business. Communicating complex data to non-technical stakeholders. Providing interactive dashboards to communicate important information.

How the course works

Learning and Assessment

You’ll spend between 9-12 hours per week on campus - in lectures, tutorials and computing lab-based practical activities. We use a blended learning approach where you work part of the time on campus and the rest online.  Self-directed learning is essential, and in total you should expect to work 35-40 hours per week.

Lectures are used to present the key concepts, theories and techniques throughout the course.  Tutorials and lab-based activities increase your understanding of the subject and allow you to develop your competence and confidence in technological and theoretical work.  

During the course, you’ll participate in team-based activities, including a group project in year 3 where you’ll specify, plan and implement a software product.  

Throughout the degree, there’s a mixture of coursework, projects, class tests and open-book examinations. 

Entry Requirements

Please note: All applicants must have a pass in Maths - National 5 grade C or GCSE grade C/5 or equivalent. National 5 Lifeskill Maths and Application of Maths NOT accepted in lieu of Maths.

Please visit our Entry from College pages for suitable College courses.

Republic of Ireland applicants, click on the UK tabs and scroll down to find your Entry Requirements.

See information about studying and applying to Abertay for International students.

Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
Higher (standard entry) BBBB  
Higher (minimum entry) We may make you an offer at the minimum entry grades if you meet the criteria. Find out if you're eligible for minimum entry (see below). ABB  
A-Level CCC  
T Level Merit Digital Production, Design & Development (Pearson) or Digital Business Services (NCFE) or Digital Support Services (NCFE) or Digital Production, Design & Development or Digital Support Services or Digital Business Services
Irish Highers H3H3H3H3 To include Maths at O3 or better
International Baccalaureate 28 Points  
BTEC Extended Diploma MMM Creative Media Production, Electrical/Electronic Engineering, Engineering, IT, Art & Design
SWAP Access AAB Access to Physical Sciences, Access to Engineering
SQA HNC/HND B Our Entry from College pages list approved HNC/HND courses
AHEAD   Successful completion of the relevant stream of our AHEAD programme

We accept a wide range of qualifications from applicants from across the world. Please select your country from the searchable list below to view different qualification entry requirements. If you have different qualifications to those listed, please contact us using the form below.

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Academic Requirements

Applicants will typically be required to achieve BBC at A-Level, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma with an overall score of 30 points, to include any essential subject(s) at S5 or H4.

English language: English B at S5 or H4 is accepted. For English A, no grade is specified. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically require a High School GPA of 3.0, plus one of the following:

  • SAT (I) score of 1200
  • 3 AP Tests at grades 433
  • 3 SAT Subject Tests at 650
  • ACT Composite score of 27

A combination of AP/SAT II tests may be used, provided they are in different subjects.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) with 6 units as follows: 2 unit at II, 2 units at III, 2 units at IV, to include any essential subject(s) at III.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the European Baccalaureate with an overall grade of 75%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

English language: English Language 1 at grade 6 or English Language 2 at grade 7 are accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomë e Maturës Shtetëore with an overall grade of 8.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Technique / Commercial with an overall grade of 16, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat de l'Enseignement Secondaire with an overall grade of 16, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants with national school qualilfications will typically be required to pass the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 14/20, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Trayecto Técnico Profesional with an overall grade of 7.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Técnico Superior/Universitario with an overall grade of 7.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Araratian Baccalaureate at Extended Level with grades BBB, to include any essential subjects.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary General Education wih an average of 13 and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 68%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Year 12 Certificate plus ATAR rank of 83 or Overall Position of 7, to include any essential subject(s) at Year 12 with grade B, grade 3 or Sound Achievement.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Reifeprüfung/Maturazeugnis with an overall grade of 2.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

English language: English at grade 2 in the Reifeprüfung/Maturazeugnis is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Tam Orta Tahsil Hazzinda Aggestat with an average of 4, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 72%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Shahadat Al-Thanawaya Al-Aama/General Secondary Education Certificate with an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree or post-secondary diploma in a relevant subject with an average grade of 75% or 3.00 (on the 4 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Intermediate/Higher Secondary School Certificate at an average of 2.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 60% or B, to include any essential subject(s) at 60% or grade B.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of General Secondary Education at an average of 6, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 7.0, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur with an overall average of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma van secundair onderwijs with an overall average of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Abschlusszeugnis der Oberstufe des Sekundarunterrichts with an overall average of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma de Bachiller at 64%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 69%, to include any essential subject(s) at 70%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Certificate of Secondary Education at an average of 4.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 75%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificado de Conculsão de Segundo Grau with an average score of 8.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.0.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificado de Conclusão de Ensino Médio with an average score of 8.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.0.

Applicants will typically be required to pass Brunei A Levels in 3 subjects at grades BBC, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma za Sredno Obrazonvanie with an average score of 5.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma of Upper Secondary Education at average of C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalaureat or Baccalaureat Technique at an overall grade of 14, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 12.

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Secondary School Diploma or Diplôme d'Études Collégiales with five grade 12 subjects at an average of 75%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Licencia de Education at an average of 4.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 5.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to complete Senior Middle/High School Certificate/Diploma at an average of 80%, to include any essential subject(s) at 77%; and pass GAOKAO with 600 points (based on the 750 points scheme).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Bachiller Academico at an average of 3.25, and the first year of a university degree or Tecnico Universitario in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.7, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Svjedodžba o Maturi with an overall grade of 3.8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Apolytírio Lykeíou with an overall grade of 18.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 17.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vysvědčení o maturitní zkoušce with an overall grade of 2.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Studentereksamen (STX), including 3 Level A subjects an overall grade of 10, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

English language: Studentereksamen English Level A or B at grade 7 is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Bachiller at an average of 7.0, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 15 / 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Gumaasiumi lõputunnistus with an average score of 4.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4; and pass 3 state examinations at a minimum of 65% (or 2 states examinations plus C1 Advanced English CAE or IELTS).

English language: 75% in the English state examination is accepted, or C1 Advanced English CAE or IELTS (overall score 6.0 with no band lower than 5.5). For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Studentsprogv at an overall grade of 10, to include any essential subject(s) at Level A grade 7.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Ylioppilastutkinto/Studentexamen at an overall grade 5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

English language: Advanced English at grade 5 within the Ylioppilastutkinto/Studentexamen is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Général/Professionnel/Technologique at an overall grade 13, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 13.

English language. English at grade 14 in the Baccalauréat Général/Professionnel/Technologique is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Option Internationale du Baccalauréat at an overall grade 12, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 13.

English language. English at grade 13 in the Option Internationale du Baccalauréat is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the NECO in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 64%/3.00, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%/2.70.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the NECO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the WAEC in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 64%/3.00, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%/2.70.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the WAEC is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sashualo Skolis Atestati (Secondary School Certificate) at an average grade of 7, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 75%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Shualo Specialuri Sastsavleblis Diplomi (Special School Leaving Diploma) at an average grade of 7, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 75%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Abitur with an overall grade of 2.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 11.

English language: Abitur English at grade 10 is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the NECO in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of B/60%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade B/55%.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the NECO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the WAEC in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of B/60%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade B/55%.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the WAEC is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Greek Apolytirion of Geniko Lykeio at grade 18 and 3 Pan-Hellenic exams at an average of 17, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 17.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Hong Kong HKDSE at 3333 in 4 core subjects, with elective subjects at 443 (for 3 electives) or 54 (for 2 electives), to include any essential subject(s) at 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Érettségi Bizonyítvány at an overall grade 4.0, with 2 higher subjects at grade 4, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Stúdentspróf at an overall grade 7, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 6.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Indian Senior School (Year 12) exam at an average of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan/Madrasah Aliyah (SMK / MA) at 85%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Post School Qualification Diploma 1 at 3.0, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants from Ireland should check the UK Year 1 Entry tab for entry requirements with Irish Highers.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Te'udat Bagrut or Bagrut with at least 2 subjects at level 5 and 1 subject at level 4 at an average of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at Level 5 with 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma di Esame di Stato at 80%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8 (on the 10 point scale) or grade 16 (on the 20 point scale).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Upper Secondary School Leaving Certificate at grade 4.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Completed Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 80% / 3.0, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) at an average of B, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at 55%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.8, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Atestas par vispārējo vidējo izglītību with an average score of 8, to include 3 state exams at a minimum of 80%, to include any essential subject(s) at 70%.

English language: 80% in the English state exam is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Libanais or Baccalauréat II with 14, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 12.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Brandos Atestatas with an average score of 8 with a minimum of 80% in 3 state exams, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.

English language: 80% in the English state exam is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplôme de Fin d'Études Secondaires at an overall grade of 46, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 44.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Higher Secondary Education with 75%, to include any essential subject(s) at 73%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Ensino Secundário Complementar with grade 3.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Cambridge Overseas Higher School Certificate (COHSC) with grades BBB, to include any essential subject(s) at minimum grade C.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Malawian School Certificate of Education at grade 5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 70%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM) with a minimum of 3 subjects at BBB or 3.00 GPA, to include any essential subject(s) at grade B/3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Unified Examination Certificate (UEC) with 4 subjects at 80% / A2 A2 B5 B5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 75%/B5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Matriculation Certificate Examination with grades BB at Advanced level and BBCC at Intermediate level, to include any essential subject(s) at Advanced level grade C.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomă de Bacalaureat with an overall grade of 8.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary Education at 70%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 80%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Higher Secondary Education Certificate (HSC) with 72%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Voorbereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO) with an overall score of 7.4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

English language: English at grade 8 in HAVO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the NECO in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.5 or 60%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.0 or 55%.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the NECO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the WAEC in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.5/60%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.0/55%.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the WAEC is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Secondary School Leaving Diploma/Matura with an overall grade of 4.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vitnemål for Vidergaende Opplaering with an overall average of 4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

English language: English at grade 4 in the Vitnemål for Vidergaende Opplaering is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Higher Secondary School Certificate at an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 68%/3.5, to include any essential subject(s) at 68%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Matura with an average score of 70%, to include 3 Advanced subjects at a minimum of 50%, to include any essential subject(s) at Advanced level with a score of 70%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma/Certificado Nível Secundário de Educação with an overall grade of 16, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 16.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Qatar Senior School Certificate (Shahadat Al-Thanawaya Al-Aama) at an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.0/80%, to include any essential subject(s) at 2.5/75%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomă de Bacalaureat with an overall grade of 8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Attestat o Srednem Obrzovanii (Certificate of Secondary Education) at an average of 4, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.9, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Secondary Education Certificate (Tawjihiyah) with an average of 60%, and either the post-secondary diploma or first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 4.0/80%, to include any essential subject(s) at 75%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass Singapore GCE A-Levels with grades BBC, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vysvedčenie o maturitnej skúške at grade 2.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

English language: English at B2 level at grade 2 in the Vysvedčenie o maturitnej skúške is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Maturitetno spričevalo at grade 4, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the National Senior Certificate (with Matriculation Endorsement) with 4 subjects at 6655, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Bachiller with an average score of 7.8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sudan School Certificate with an average of 60%/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 75%/B+, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Avgangsbetyg/Slutbetyg fran Gymnasieskola with an average score of 17.5, to include any essential subject(s) at level 5 grade B.

English language: English Level 5 at grade B or English Level 6 at grade C in the Avgangsbetyg/Slutbetyg fran Gymnasieskola is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificat de Maturité with an overall grade of 5.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass Maturitätszeugnis with an overall grade of 5.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Attestato Di Maturità with an overall grade of 5.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.8, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Certificate of Secondary Education/Maw 6 with an average of 80%/3.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3; or complete the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 3.0, to include any essential subject(s) at 2.5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the High School Diploma at an average of 55%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.5 (on the 5 point scale) or 65 (on the 100 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 4.0, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 75% / 3.0 (on the 4 point scale) / 4.4 (on the 5 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Secondary Education Certificate Examination at 65%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 2.7, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma of Academic Lyceum at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Técnico Superior Universitario, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 60% / 6.5 (on the 10 point scale) / 14 (on the 20 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Zimbabwe General Certificate of Education at Advanced Level with grades BBC, to include any essential subject(s).


English Language Requirements

All courses at Abertay University are taught in English. If your first language is not English, you will need to demonstrate that you meet our English language requirements. Accepted English language qualifications include:

IELTS - overall score of 6.0 with no band lower than 5.5

TOEFL - overall score of 78 (individual elements: L-17, R-18, S-20, W-17)

Cambridge FCE/CAE/CPE - overall score of 169 on Cambridge Grading Scale

International Baccalaureate - English B at S5 or H4, English A no specific grade required

European Baccalaureate - English Language 1 at grade 6 or English Language 2 at grade 7

You do not need to prove your knowledge of English language if you are a national of certain countries. Please see English Language Requirements for the full list of accepted qualifications and further details.

 

If your academic qualifications aren't listed above, or if you have any further questions, please contact our international team using the form below. There is also lots of useful information for international applicants on how to apply, visa information, and studying in Scotland on our international pages.


Contact our International Team

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Not sure if you're eligible for entry?

If you have the potential and motivation to study at university, regardless of your background or personal circumstances, we welcome your application.  

We understand some people have faced extra challenges before applying to university, which is why we consider the background in which your academic grades have been achieved when making an offer.  

If you expect to receive passes in three Scottish Highers (grades A-C) and have...  

  • been in care, or are a young carer yourself

  • attended a school or lived in an area where not many people go to university

  • are eligible for free school meals

  • are a young person estranged from your family

  • are a government-recognised refugee or have asylum seeker status

  • are a registered pupil with sustained engagement in a targeted aspiration-raising programme such as LIFT OFF, LEAPS, FOCUS West or Aspire North  

... we encourage you to submit an application.

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Support for Ukrainian students

We're keen to offer help to Ukrainian students who may wish to transfer from their existing institution in Ukraine or to register with us as new students for intake in September. There will be no tuition fees charged for the duration of the degree programme, as those with refugee status are treated as ‘Home/Scottish’ students and will also have access to the Student Awards Agency for Scotland bursary and student loans. Our Recruitment Team can help guide applicants.

FIND OUT MORE

Fees and funding

The course fees you'll pay and the funding available to you depends on factors such as your nationality, location, personal circumstances and the course you are studying. 

More information

Find out about grants, bursaries, tuition fee loans, maintenance loans and living costs in our undergraduate fees and funding section.

Scholarships

We offer a range of scholarships to help support your studies with us.

As well as Abertay scholarships for English, Welsh, Northern Irish and international students, there are a range of corporate and philanthropic scholarships available. Some are course specific, many are not. There are some listed below or you can visit the Undergraduate scholarship pages.

Scholarships

Abertay RUK Scholarship: Games/Computing/Cyber

A scholarship for prospective undergraduate games, computing and cybersecurity students applying from England, Wales or Northern Ireland.

Abertay International Scholarship

This is an award of up to £12,000 for prospective international undergraduate students.

The Robert Reid Bursary

Two £1,000 awards for students who have overcome challenges to attend university.

Get inspired

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Ben Newcombe

Ben graduated from our BSc (Hons) Computing programme in 2017.

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Scott Mitchell

Scott is currently a Production Technician at Equinor.

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Discover Uni

The Discover Uni dataset (formerly Unistats) is an official source of information about higher education. It collates comparable information in areas students have identified as important in making decisions about what and where to study.

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