Incoming Students Course Offer

Please find details below on the courses available to students entering on Erasmus+, EU visiting and study abroad exchange programmes.

What can you study

The modules open to you at Abertay as an incoming Erasmus, exchange, study abroad or EU visiting student are detailed below by school: School of Applied Sciences, School of Business, Law and Social Sciences; and the School of Design & Informatics. Please scroll down the page to view pathways and module descriptions.

Each subject pathway has at least one option of modules to follow, and some include the choice to take an elective module. The standard number of modules to take each semester is 3, though in some cases it may differ depending on the number of credits per module. Each semester you should take 60 SCQF credits (which is equal to 30 ECTS), with all modules counting for 20 SCQF credits except where indicated.

When making your application to Abertay, please ensure you have looked through the options below to select your study programme for the correct semester or year. With each module you will find a short description of the course, aims, learning outcomes and indicative content. In the application form, you will be asked to select a subject pathway, then your preferred modules, and the choice of option or elective modules where appropriate.

Module pre-requisites

Your choice of modules is subject to academic approval. Some individual modules require pre- or co-requisites (which are indicated) so approval will be needed from the programme leader at Abertay based on your transcript to date. We may ask you for further evidence of any similar modules you have already completed at your home university.

Timetables

The subject pathways are designed to minimise the impact of timetable clashes, as they follow the course structures that already exist. Most combinations following subject pathways will not cause a timetable clash, though these are subject to confirmation. Timetables are announced a few weeks before the start of teaching so unfortunately we are unable to guarantee whether a certain combination of modules will be feasible at the time of application.

Elective Modules

In many of the subject pathways for the Spring/second semester (January-May), there is the opportunity to take an elective module. This could be on a completely different subject, and no prior knowledge or prerequisite is needed for these. Have a look at our full list of elective modules here.

If you are unsure about your course selection, please email international@abertay.ac.uk and we will be happy to advise you.

School of Applied Sciences

Please find below the pathways for the following subject areas:

  • Biomedical Science
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Food Science & Nutrition
  • Forensic Sciences
  • Psychology
  • Sport

Biomedical Science - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Biomedical Science course.

Module 1: LSC202 Cell Biology & Immunology

Module 2: LSC203 Medical Microbiology

Module 3: LSC204 Medical Physiology

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Biomedical Science course.

Module 1: LSC301 Clinical Biochemistry and Cellular Pathology

Module 2: LSC302 Professional Studies 2

Module 3: LSC303 Clinical 2: Haematology & Transfusion Science

LSC202 Description

This module provides an integrative study of how cells in the body function to defend against injury and disease

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide a holistic view of defence against injury and disease including the mechanisms of cell proliferation and cell cycle control.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Discuss the roles of the main components of the immune system and explain how they provide a coordinated response to pathogens.
2. Evaluate the use of antibodies as molecular probes and detection systems.
3. Describe and explain the mechanism of hypersensitive reactions, autoimmune disorders and immunodeficiency diseases.
4. Recognise the mechanisms that regulate proliferation and differentiation in eukaryotic cells.

Indicative Content
1. Immune system
Innate & acquired immune systems. Specific & Non- specific defense mechanisms. The immune response. Molecular biology of T & B cell responses to antigens. Clonal selection and expansion. Role of lymphokines. Opsonisation, complement activation., Structure, function of antibody molecules. Classes of immunoglobulins. Pathologies of the immune system including hypersensitive reactions, autoimmune disorders and immunodeficiency diseases. Transplant immunology.
2. Antibodies as Molecular Probes
Diagnostic systems based on antibody-antigen interaction. Agglutination, Precipitation reactions. Antibody titres. Solid phase assays. RIA, ELISA, Immunofluorescence etc. Direct, Indirect and sandwich assays. Use of serological methods in diagnosis of diseases and antibodies for therapeutic applications.
3. Cell biology
Regulation of cell growth and proliferation; cell cycle checkpoints; growth factors, cell communication and signalling, principle of differentiation, tissue repair

LSC203 Description

This module is designed to give students a broad understanding of microbiological principles related to microbes associated with human disease, diagnosis and treatment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of microbial growth and microbial diseases of humans. Students will gain knowledge of microbial characteristics, clinical diagnosis, epidemiology, pathogenesis and control of such infectious diseases.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand and explain contemporary theories of microbial growth, metabolism, differentiation and motility. 
2. Evaluate the factors that are involved with the epidemiology, pathogenesis, detection, diagnosis and control of infectious diseases (including antibiotics, vaccines and antibody therapies).
3. Analyse and discuss the results of practical experiments in an area related to disease epidemiology and/or control, or antibiotic sensitivity testing. 
4. Evaluate drug strategies for the control of infectious diseases and the current problems associated with the development of drug resistance. 

Indicative Content
1. Microbial Growth, Reproduction and Motility
The microbial (bacterial) growth curve and it's phases. Prokaryotic cell cycle. Phenomena associated with the growth curve (e.g. incorporation of peptidoglycan, overlapping chromosome replication etc.). Microbial metabolism. True turning point. Dormancy. Stringent response. Endosporulation. Chemotaxis, Individual motility. Community motility. Biofilm structure & function, bacterial conjugation, transformation & transduction
2. Bacterial diseases
Clinically important taxonomic groups of bacteria and viruses. Types of clinical specimens and processes for isolation and identification of organisms. Immunological and molecular systems for specific diagnosis. Clinical characteristics of diseases. Factors affecting clinical diagnosis including. Preventative strategies and therapies.  Microbial determinants of pathogenicity and virulence. Mechanisms of cell & tissue damage. Role of biochemical changes in diagnosis and monitoring of disease.
3. Antimicrobial chemotherapy and drug resistance
Modes of action of major synthetic and natural antibiotics. Antibiotic sensitivity testing in clinical laboratories. MIC values. Significance for therapeutic control in hospitals. Mechanisms of drug resistance in micro-organisms. Limitations of current drugs and novel development strategies. Qualitative and quantitative methods to identify antibiotic sensitivity of medically important organisms. 
4. Epidemiology and Public Health Measures
Transmission routes of disease agents - reservoirs, portals of entry, noscomial infections. Epidemiology - epidemics, pandemics, and endemic disease. Practical study of factors affecting epidemiology of diseases. Public health control methods - Vaccination, Sewage/Water treatment, legislation, public information etc. 

LSC204 Description

This module builds on the fundamental physiological processes studied in LSC102. A more in depth exploration of key systems will be used to investigate the pathophysiology of key diseases with a focus on deviation from healthy physiology; medical approaches to interventions and/or treatment will be discussed. There will be a strong focus on the genetic inheritability of these disorders as well as a key focus on the role of genetic mutations.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a deeper understanding of key physiological systems and how genetics can play an important part in health and disease. Whilst studying the core material, the module also aims to focus on developing key scientific writing skills including, literature searches, paper reading and scientific writing.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Have an advanced understanding of the functioning of key physiological systems.
2. Relate knowledge of key physiological systems above to the underlying pathophysiology of key disorders.
3. Show an appreciation for the medical intervention and treatment of these key disorders.
4. Develop skills in scientific literature searches, scientific writing skills and independent learning.
5. Explain the mechanisms by which cells obtain energy from substrates.

Indicative Content
1. Advanced Neurophysiology
a focus on synaptic physiology, plasticity and the role of these processes in learning, memory and addiction. Dysfunction of important physiological processes in key neurological disorders.
2. Advanced reproductive physiology
a focus on infertility, the underlying pathophysiology and treatments.
3. Advanced musculoskeletal physiology
a focus on skeletal muscle and associated structures, tendons, ligaments bones etc. Pathophysiology of skeletal muscle e.g. muscular dystrophy.
4. An introduction to scientific writing
will focus on literature searches, paper reading and scientific writing skills.

LSC301 Description

This module is formulated to enhance knowledge and understanding of the cellular, tissue and molecular bases of disease and dysfunction in humans. It considers general processes and approaches available for diagnosis and monitoring, and then focuses on selected pathologies in an integrative (ie. pathogenesis, diagnosis/monitoring, clinical consequences, etc)context. It is primarily designed for students on biomedical sciences or similar degrees. 

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of (i) cellular, molecular and systemic processes in human disease; (ii) techniques available for diagnosis and clinical management; and (iii) the conceptual framework for understanding human dysfunctions. 

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Differentiate between the core techniques of histo-/cytopathology, and evaluate their theoretical basis, applications, and strengths and weaknesses. 
2. Relate the fundamental principles of pathology eg. Central dogma, nomenclature, disease types, core characteristics to the categorisation and evaluation of disease states. 
3. Critically appraise the major mechanisms and clinical sequelae of: cell injury; inflammations/repair; growth disorders, ischaemia/infarction; adaptive changes; neoplasia; immunopathology.
4. By reference to examples taken from the GIT, hepatobiliary and female reproductive systems critically analyse relationships between cell/molecular changes and the main associated diseases.
5. Relate the pathogenesis and clinical profiles of major biochemical dyfunctions/diseases to their diagnostic tests and clinical management (Ex. Diabetes, liver/kidney, electrolyte imbalances) 
6. Distinguish between techniques and technologies clinical biochemistry and pathology including emergent technologies and applications, and evaluate their strengths, weaknesses and challenges. 

Indicative Content
1. Basic Principles of Pathology
Structural-functional correlations, signs, symptoms and syndromes; pathological terms and terminology; organisation of pathology services. The role and future of molecular pathology. The vital role of imaging in pathology. 
2. Core Techniques in Clinical Biochemistry
Introduction: Range of diagnostic, monitoring and screening tests; basics of test design, sample handling and test interpretation. Evaluation of analytes in selected specific conditions (diseases and dysfunctions) eg. carbohydrate and lipid disorders, and for specific organ/system functions eg. liver, kidney, heart. Water, electrolytes and acid-base balance. Tumour markers. 
3. Core Techniques in Cytopathology and Histopathology
Histotechnique: Types of microscopy and applications in cyto-/histopathology; preparation of cells and tissues; microtomy, cryomicrotomy and ultramicrotomy; range of routine and special stains; practical challenges of staining; reporting procedures. Structure/ultrastructure of normal cells and tissues; structural/ultrastructural correlates of disease. Immunocytochemical approaches eg probe range, FISH. Role of imaging in pathological screening, diagnosis and monitoring. 
4. Understanding Neoplasia
Distinctive characteristics of neoplasms; Benign- malignant spectrum; cancer classification systems; terminology; characteristics of cancer cells (and their use in diagnosis). Molecular pathogenesis/multi- step nature of neoplasia.Metastasis. Clinical consequences of established malignancies eg.paraneoplastic syndromes 
5. Cellular Pathology: Cell Injury, Adaptation and Death
Cellular homeostasis. Dysregulation of the cell cycle, DNA damage and repair and associated diseases. Responses to injury. Necrosis and apoptosis. Patterns and types of of necrosis. Adaptive responses to injury eg. hyperplasia, atrophy,metaplasia, dysplasia (Neoplasia considered under separate heading). Abnormal deposition; calcification. 
6. General Pathology: Inflammation and Repair
Acute inflammation - Sequence, vascular dimensions, mediators. Chronic inflammations. Tissue repair processes (At tissue, cellular and molecular levels). Repair of selected tissues eg. skin, bone. New developments in tissue repair. Effects of aging on repair. Immunopatholgical dimensions. 
7. Systemic Pathology: Selected Dysfunctions
Selected systems - In-depth illustrations of the integration of (1) Cellular, molecular and systemic approaches;(2)Investigative techniques; and (3) Management of clinical consequences. Examples will be taken from: (1) Colorectal carcinomas, IBDs, stomach cancers; (2) Female reproductive cancers; (3) Hepatocellular failures and other hepatobiliary dysfunctions; and (4) Renal pathologies. 

LSC302 Description

This module is designed to provide all BMS students, on both Applied and Standard programme routes, with [a] an understanding of information relevant to professional work in the clinical environment, and [b] an understanding of bioethics (medical ethics). The module covers essential aspects of the profession that are mandatory for all students on both programme routes, in order to meet IBMS accreditation requirements. the module is an essential pre-requisite for students undertaking subsequent hospital placements on the Applied route, in order to meet HCPC approval requirements.

Aims
The aim of this module is to: [a] provide the student with an understanding of [a] career structure, professional codes and good laboratory management in Health Service Biomedical Science and other bioscience industries; and [b] provide reflective education in bioethics.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically evaluate the functional role of Biomedical Scientists 
2. Discuss and explain the professional scope of practice and conduct in Biomedical Science and other Bioscience Industries and outline the functional roles of the IBMS and HCPC. 
3. Evaluate relevant Health & Safety legislation and its appropriate implementation for Bioscience employees. 
4. Discuss and explain the importance of specimen integrity on receipt into the laboratory. 
5. Discuss and explain clinical governance and accreditation in laboratories.
6. Evaluate the ethical issues arising from developments in medicine and biology.

Indicative Content
1. Management and Professional Issues in the NHS context
Professional regulation and conduct, role of the Biomedical Scientist, user demand and management of staff and workload, training and CPD, effective team working. 
2. Health and Safety
Legislation governing laboratory Health and Safety, hazard identification and risk assessment, COSHH, biological safety. 
3. Bioscience industry
The role of the ICH Guidelines (Quality, Safety, Efficacy), FDA Regulations and their role in Biotech/Biological Product Development and Manufacture.
4. Bioethics
Ethical approaches: deontological and teleological. Ethical systems: intuitive responses, religous laws, rights, utilitarianism. Application of ethical approaches and principles to contemporary bioscience and biomedical issues.

LSC303 Description

This module deals with the clinical detection, diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of a variety of human diseases. The module will be delivered by practicing clinical biomedical scientists and will examine blood and its constituents in both the normal and diseased states and appraise the use of a range of diagnostic investigations. 

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with a knowledge of the normal state of blood and the changes typical in a range of clinical conditions; a knowledge of blood groups and matching techniques for the use of therapeutic blood components in treatment. 

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Compare and contrast the haematology blood parameters in normal and diseased states
2. Appreciate the applications of a range of investigative techniques and their expected results related to common conditions. 
3. Discuss blood group systems and evaluate techniques relevant to serology and transfusion. 
4. Appreciate the essential requirements for the preparation, storage and use of blood products. 
5. Critically analyse and discuss the results of practical experiments in areas related to Haematology & Transfusion Science. 

Indicative Content
1. Haematology
Red cell, white cell and platelet disorders and their causes. Inherited and acquired anaemias, malignant and other blood disorders. Blood coagulation and its defects.
2. Serology and transfusion science
Blood group systems. Donor blood collection. Compatibility testing and transfusion hazards. Blood product and reagent preparation, testing, storage and use.
3. Haematology and serology practicals
Morphological features of blood cells, and their classification. Blood processing and testing.

Biomedical Science - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Biomedical Science course.

Module 1: FOR212 Investigative Analytical Science

Module 2: LSC201 Molecular Biology and Genetics

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of BSc Biomedical Science course.

Module 1: LSC309 Perspectives and Technologies in the Life Sciences Sector

Module 2: LSC305 Applications Mini Project

Module 3: LSC306 Test tube to tablet

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

FOR212 Description

A module designed to teach basic analytical skills and the theory behind these techniques, and to relate them to forensic and biomedical applications

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of basic analytical techniques.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Select, describe and apply analytical methods
2. Apply, interpret and report statistical tests for data analysis
3. Carry out a range of specified analyses

Indicative Content
1. Quality
Sample custody and traceability. Data interpretation and reporting.
2. Sample Preparation
Sampling. Drying. Crushing. Weighing. Dissolution. Separation and concentration.
3. Spectroscopy
Electromagnetic radiation and the nature of light. Beer Lambert law. Theory of spectroscopy. Instrumentation. UV-visible, IR and AAS spectroscopy. Presumptive tests. Spectroscopic
4. Theory and Principles of Chromatography
Introduction to TLC.
5. Immunotechnology
Diagnostic and detection systems based on antibody-antigen interaction: RIA, ELISA, Agglutination, Precipitation reactions. Direct, Indirect and sandwich assays. Use of serological methods in diagnosis of infectious diseases and forensic applications such as body fluid identification

LSC201 Description

This module provides an introduction to both Medical and Forensic genetics and uses specific examples, to highlight the importance of DNA analyses, in both fields.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the fundamental concepts in molecular biology and genetics, together with relevant skills.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Explain the architecture, expression of human genes which are important in determining health, disease and forensically useful phenotypes.
2. Discuss both clinical and forensic genetic variation in the context of human genomics.
3. Deploy molecular genetic laboratory and bioinformatic analytical techniques.

Indicative Content
1. Genes and gene expression
Structure of human genes. Control of gene expression, with an emphasis on variations in genes that cause both medical conditions and common, forensically useful human traits. Splicing and differential gene expression. Common human variations and Mutations, including point mutations, indels, repeat expansions, and chromosomal aberrations.
2. Human Genomics and bioinformatic analysis
Sequence architecture of the human genome. Chromosome structure. DNA sequencing methods: Focusing on the comparison of the dideoxy irreversible terminator method of Sanger, with the “next generation” reversible terminator method of Balasubramanian and Klenerman. Analysis of sequence data. Genetic variation: the human gene pool, population genetics including Hardy-Weinberg equilibria.
3. Genetic engineering and other analytical techniques
Basic cloning including restriction digestion, ligation and transfection. PCR, Gel and capillary electrophoresis and accurate sizing of DNA fragments.

LSC309 Description

This module covers contemporary medical biotechnologies that are currently being either developed or routinely used, in both the life science sector.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with a perspective of the current and emerging methods used in the life sciences sector, including commercial and research aspects of the processes of diagnostics, vaccine and drug testing and development.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate current methods used in the life sciences sector, to enable new diagnostics, vaccine and drug discovery and development.
2. Appraise specific technological and commercial activities used in the life sciences sector.
3. Critically discuss development frameworks for bioproduct or bioprocess innovation that may be used by a life sciences company to gain competitive advantage.

Indicative Content
1. Contemporary techniques in medical biotechnology
Students will be introduced to contemporary medical biotechnologies e.g Next generation genomic and transcriptomic sequencing, proteomics, interactomics, metabolomics.
2. The use of current medical biotechnologies in the public and private sector
Nucleic acid and protein diagnostics, methods that lead to diagnostic screening techniques and drug discovery. For example diagnostic nucleic acid techniques, immune diagnostic kits, targeted drug screening using enzymes (eg. kinases), proteins (eg. cytochrome P450), from laboratory to market will be explained and demonstrated (during industrial visits) to students.

LSC305 Description

In order to be a confident and effective laboratory scientist it is necessary to understand all processes involved in experimental design/assay development and testing. This module is designed to equip students with the necessary basic practical/analytical skills and theoretical knowledge to be reliable and independent laboratory workers.

Aims
The aim of this practical based module is to give the student an understanding and experience of the complexity of independent experimental design/assay development in keeping with Quality by Design theory and testing and data analysis from first principles.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Define a testable hypothesis/research question.
2. Design, execute and optimise an experimental plan (to include assay/equipment, controls, replicates, statistical tests/theory/COSHH/H&S).
3. Apply knowledge of statistical analysis to the evaluation of data and the design of experimental protocols.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the theory/principles behind the practical techniques.
5. Demonstrate knowledge of the underlying biology.

Indicative Content
1. Experimental design & statistics/data analysis
Determining objectives and specifying hypothesis; factors, levels, blocking and randomisation; use of appropriate statistical tests, using the statistical package SPSS
3. Mini investigation
Carry out a mini project in which a variety of experimental methods are applied and critically evaluated (the exact nature of the techniques used will depend on the nature of the project and will vary).
4. Information literacy
Plan and conduct literature search, making use of a wide range of resources, including full-text and abstracting databases as well as reference management software.
5. Principles of experimental techniques
Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of experimental techniques used in the execution of the mini-project including specific strengths and limitations.

LSC306 Description

This module is about the process of turning basic biological research into an end product e.g. a drug, licenced for clinical use. Stages of the process discussed include drug design, pharmacodynamics to identify efficacy, pharmacokinetics and clinical trials. The essential roles of process management and quality by design in meeting the demands of regulatory bodies will be introduced.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide students with a detailed understanding of the pre-clinical and clinical stages of drug development.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically discuss the process of drug development from drug target identification and basic pharmacology to product development and licensing.
2. Evaluate clinical trial data and understand the basis of clinical trial design.
3. Understand the importance of the link between knowledge and management of a process and the quality and successful licencing of the final product.

Indicative Content
1. Process and quality management
Process and quality management as key themes throughout drug development: Good laboratory practice, good clinical practice and good manufacturing practice. The role of Quality by Design, Regulatory Affairs and quality assurance in drug licencing. The role of MHRA and FDA, etc.
2. Identifying and developing candidate drug molecules
Examining clinical drivers, QSAR, high-throughput-screening, intellectual property.
3. Cellular structures as drug targets
Cellular structures as drug targets focusing mainly on cell surface receptors: Pharmacodynamics of drug-receptor binding. Quantifying drug efficacy and binding in vitro.
4. Preclinical development
Pharmacokinetics, toxicity studies in animal models.
5. Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials Good Clinical Practice, Phase I to IV of clinical trials. Study design trial, sources of bias, recruitment, and sample size, analysis of data Per-protocol/intention to treat analysis.
6. Guest Lecturer from Industry
Product development and marketing
7. Large scale manufacturing
Large scale manufacturing, Regulatory approval, post market monitoring (Phase (IV)

Civil and Environmental Engineering - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BEng Civil and Environmental Engineering course.

Module 1: EEM201 Surveying and Construction

Module 2: EEM203 Water Resources and Fluid Mechanics

Module 3: EEM206 Structural Engineering 1

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BEng Civil and Environmental Engineering course.

Module 1: EEM302 Civil and Environmental Engineering Practice

Module 2: EEM304 Geotechnical Engineering

Module 3: EEM305 Structural Engineering 2

EEM201 Description

Practical application of civil and environmental engineering skills, techniques and knowledge.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with intensive practical experience, over an extended period, in surveying and construction activities; practical application of surveying and setting-out skills, an awareness of the preliminary considerations involved in construction developments and a knowledge of the materials and procedures employed in construction of small commercial/industrial building works.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Apply surveying techniques and use surveying equipment for the completion of a large practical land survey and in the setting out of construction works.
2. Apply prior understanding of materials,sustainability, safety practice and construction techniques to a example of civil engineering construction.

Indicative Content
1. Land Surveying:
Large area traverse control survey; levelling survey for vertical control; detailed topographical survey using total stations / electronic data capture; computer processing and plot production; calculations for setting out (plan position and vertical control); setting out for small projects.
2. Preparation of profession report and plan diagrams:
Preparation of profession report and plan diagrams based on field application of surveying techniques and practice
3. Construction Practice:
Planning, execution and appraisal for the construction of a civil engineering activity; temporary works; materials and equipment requirements, method statements, resource management, health and safety assessment, sustainability assessment.
4. Professional reporting:
Preparation and professional reporting of engineering practice and outcomes
5. Risk assessment:
Awareness and application of risk assessment and health and safety requirements for all aspects of engineering practice
6. Sustainability considerations:
Awareness and application of sustainability considerations for all aspects of engineering practice
7. Conceptual design
client requirements; scheme design and evaluation

EEM203 Description

This module introduces students to the fundamental principles of hydrology and hydrostatics and enables them to apply these principles to model problems relevant to water resources and civil engineering.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide a basic understanding of hydrostatics, and a knowledge of the various types of water resources and factors affecting their availability and quality.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of properties of fluids and describe and apply concepts of liquid flow behaviour.
2. Understand, describe and apply principles of flow measurement techniques.
3. Describe hydrologic principles and the sources and types of water and the factors affecting the quantity and quality of surface waters.
4. Understand and apply concepts of hydrostatic pressure to problems on surfaces submerged in fluids.

Indicative Content
1. Hydrology
Review of the hydrological cycle. Fundamental principles of hydrology. Precipitation, occurrence and forms, estimation and measurements, rain gauges and methods of data handling. Evaporational influences and estimation methods.
2. Water Use and Quality
Demand, use and re-use of water. Sustainable water use. Human and environmental needs for water and water conservation. Introduction to water quality parameters; quality of various types and sources of water; factors affecting quality.
3. Water related disasters, and Sustainable Water Management
Floods and droughts - nature and causes. Sustainable water management, sustainable catchment management and sustainable drainage systems (SUDS).
4. Fluid Properties
Review of the properties of liquid fluids. Reynolds experiment; Reynolds number, mean velocity, discharge; description of types and patterns of flow; velocity gradients, laminar and turbulent motion, streamlines and flow nets.
5. Fluid Statics
Variation of pressure in a fluid; pressure measurements; pressure forces on surfaces; hydrostatic forces on plane and curved surfaces submerged in fluids; buoyancy forces; stability and metacentric height.
6. Fluid Dynamics
Continuity equations, conservation of mass, steady flow; Bernoulli equations: application to devices; the momentum equation.

EEM206 Description

A development of advanced structural analysis and design.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : An understanding of advanced structural analysis and basic structural design procedures.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Carry out advanced structural analysis.
2. Fully understand the requirements of structural design and the principles/procedures for the design of simple structural elements and understand the underlying scientific principles
3. Understand and apply the appropriate codes of practice and industry standards/published technical literature for designing structural elements

Indicative Content
1. Structural analysis
Compression members: modes of failure, slenderness and instability, Euler’s buckling load i.e. timber columns Basic concepts: Statically determinate vs statically indeterminate structures i.e. flexibility and stiffness methods Influence lines Symmetry
2. Structural design
Requirements of structural design, design philosophies Design requirements, loads and material strengths, partial safety factors, design process Introduction to timber column design Introduction to masonry Introduction temporary works
3. Laboratory Work
Timber beams tested to destruction and Buckling of [model] Struts

EEM302 Description

This module is intended to prepare students for work within the diverse opportunities provided within the engineering profession and to develop essential knowledge and skills in order to contribute to the organisation and management of engineering projects. 

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : The aim of this Module is to provide the student with knowledge and understanding of the practical application of management and health and safety to work within engineering to appreciate the diverse interrelationships between the professional and the organisation. 

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate the procurement process including roles of professionals in complying with health and safety requirements in engineering work. 
2. Plan and manage the project process by solving project problems through application of appropriate project management techniques. 
3. Appraise the cost effectiveness and sustainability of construction projects and construction operations. 
4. Develop professional employability skills, apply principles of professional code of conduct, identify attributes for personal development and actively engage with CPD.

Indicative Content
1. Health and Safety:
CDM and other current health and safety regulations, roles obligations and responsibilities under legislation for health and safety.
2. Procurement strategies, tendering and construction contracts:
Management of the design process, estimating and tendering, pre-tender planning, construction contracts; contract formation, contractual problems. Topical procurement issues.
3. Project control tools:
Planning and programming tools and techniques, strategies for managing uncertainty, PERT and related techniques. Cost control systems, quality management.
4. Economic and sustainability assessment:
Economic evaluation: life Cycle costing, CEEQUAL and BREEAM. Cost benefit analysis Sustainability assessment approaches. Sustainability indicators, Multi-criteria analysis.
5. Professional employability skills:
Employer/employee relationship. Interview skills and techniques. Presenting a professional CV. Equality and diversity. Professional codes of conduct (such as ICE) and specific issues including resolving ethical dilemmas through case studies.

EEM304 Description

Initial development of geotechnical analysis and design and their application in civil engineering.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the students with : An understanding of soils physical and mechanical properties in theory and practice and an introduction into geotechnical engineering problems.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Comprehend the origin, physical and mechanical properties of cohesive and granular soils.
2. Understand the basic rock mechanics and laboratory tests to determine the mechanical properties.
3. Analyse geotechnical shear strength and compressibility data to obtain the relevant design parameters.
4. Evaluate and classify soils based on their physical and mechanical properties derived from visual examination and data from laboratory tests.

Indicative Content
1. Physical properties of soil
Factors controlling the weathering of rock and the formation of soils. Moisture content, density, void ratio, porosity, air content and saturation.
2. Soil Compaction and re-use
The compaction of soils − theory and practise. Suitability criteria and the re−use of fill for engineering purposes.
3. Effective stress
The concept of total and effective stress and pore water pressure.
4. Soil Shear Strength
The theory of soil shear strength, Mohr Coulomb failure criterion. Determine shear strength parameters for design purposes from shear box, undrained triaxial.
5. Consolidation of soils
Measurement of the consolidation of cohesive soils in the laboratory, theoretical consideration of amount and rate of settlement, over-consolidation ratio and the application of the e/log p' graph.
6. Seepage
Flow net construction, seepage into excavations, seepage forces and piping.
7. Laboratory Work
Determine moisture content, Atterberg Limit and shear strength of sand and saturated clay. Safe working practices in a laboratory situation.

EEM305 Description

Structural design in reinforced concrete and in steel.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to investigate and solve geotechnical and structural problems related to the built environment.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. To fully understand and evaluate the requirements, principles and procedures for the design of structural elements and systems.
2. To understand and apply the appropriate codes of practice and industry standards/published technical literature for designing structural elements and systems.
3. To investigate and analyse the behaviour of structural elements at ultimate collapse.

Indicative Content
1. Design Loads
Wind loading and snow loading.
2. Reinforced Concrete
Material properties, limit state design requirements, loads and partial safety factors, failure mechanism and criteria Design of structural elements including singly and doubly reinforced beams, one-way and two-way slabs, axially loaded columns, foundations and cantilever retaining walls
3. Design of Steel Structures
Material properties and grading, partial safety factors, section properties and classification, Design of beams subject to uniaxial bending, Design of columns and base plates, Design of steel connections.
4. Plastic collapse of steel structures
Plastic hinge formation, plastic moment capacity, plastic section modulus, shape factor, failure criterion, upper and lower bound theorems, plastic analysis of statically indeterminate beams and single storey, single bay portal frames.
5. Use of computer packages and design
6. Laboratory Work
Concrete lab. Safe working practices in a laboratory situation.

Civil and Environmental Engineering - Semester 2

Option 1

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BEng Civil and Environmental Engineering course.

Module 1: EEM207 Engineering Science 3

Module 2: EEM208 Environmental Engineering

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2

This pathway is from the 4th year of the MEng Civil and Environmental Engineering course. This option should only be selected by Engineering students in their 4th or 5th year of studies.

Module 1: EEM409 Finite element analysis and application

Module 2: EEM410 Water and Environment Engineering 1

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

EEM207 Description

To examine the properties and application of a range of construction materials, to introduce the principles of highway design and to explore the application of Building Information Modelling

Aims
The aim of this module is to examine properties and application of a range of construction materials and to give the students an introductory understanding of Highway design and Building Information Modelling

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Discuss the benefits and limitations of Building Information Modelling (BIM)
2. Evaluate road scheme proposals and traffic management systems and design of a road alignment.
3. Examine the properties and applications of a variety of construction materials and associated test procedures including the appropriateness (including Health and Safety)of construction materials for different construction applications.

Indicative Content
1. Properties and Uses of Materials
Origin, occurrence, appearances, identification, classification, properties, manufacture, conversion, production and uses of various construction materials; material selection and specification, sustainability of materials.
2. Materials Testing
Testing and evaluation applied to common construction materials
3. Highway Engineering: Road Alignment:
Theory and practice in the layout of vertical and horizontal curvature. Road realignment project with a focus on sustainability. Computer based road design packages. Influence of safety on design solutions.
4. Highway Intersections:
Layout and analysis of priority junctions, roundabouts, signal control and grade- separated interchanges. Influence of safety on design solutions. Highway Materials, Design and Construction Pavement construction: flexible and rigid pavements, bound and unbound materials, mix design, specification for materials and construction, testing. Pavement loading, design of flexible and rigid pavements. Sustainability and recycling issues.
5. Highway Pavements
Design and Construction Pavement construction: flexible and rigid pavements, bound and unbound materials, mix design, specification for materials and construction, testing. Pavement loading, design of flexible and rigid pavements. Sustainability and recycling issues.
6. BIM
BIM in practice, BIM in cost estimation and control.

EEM208 Description

Communication | Team Work | Problem Solving | Research | ICT Skills | Planning | Interpersonal | Quantitative

Aims
The aim of this module is to enable students analyse the distribution and movement of water and contaminants of the physical environment; between air, surface water, groundwater, and to apply engineering principles involved in managing our environmental systems.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Model the dispersion of air pollutants in the atmosphere and predict air quality.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of unit processes for the abatement and control of drinking water pollutants.
3. Carry out an environmental impact assessment.
4. Evaluate design and policy options for the abatement and control of water pollution.

Indicative Content
1. Water Quality
Overview of the principles of air, water and land interaction and surface water quality management: Introduction of water quality and management; Fate of water pollutants in rivers and lakes; Drinking Water Quality standards, UK and EU Directives; Fundamentals of self-purification; Models used as quality predictive tools: Streeter Phelps equation.
2. Water Treatment
Coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection process.
3. Groundwater quality and management
Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction, Stream- Aquifer Interaction. Aquifer management.
4. Air quality and pollution management
Overview on sources of air pollution and monitoring and control of emissions of air pollutants; Dispersion of air pollutants in atmosphere; Air pollution modelling approaches and Indoor air pollution.
5. Environmental impact Assessment (EIA)
EIA procedure. Preparation of Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Case studies and EIA of developments.

EEM409 Description

Introduction to the theory of finite element analysis and its application in research and industry

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the theoretical background of finite element analysis and an appreciation of the complexity of finite element analysis for practical use.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand and evaluate the concepts of numerical analysis and governing equations
2. Able to create and analyse finite element models for structural analysis based on structural and continuum elements
3. Interpret results of the analyses and assess error levels
4. Critically evaluate the constraints and implications imposed by the finite element method.
5. Understand the theoretical background to the applications considered in the module

Indicative Content
1. Finite element method
• Background, history, applicability to different physics problems • Illustration of direct stiffness method based on 2 dimensional beam elements • Introduction to the Principle of Minimum Potential Energy • Development of Finite Element stiffness and mass matrix for a 2-dimensional membrane element • Isoparametric 1,2 and 3D elements • Numerical integration • Meshing and post processing considerations • Problems and errors associated with applying FEM to the solution of actual problems
2. Application
Application of the FE method in research e.g. the modelling of shell and plate buckling and the implementation of dynamic loading in FE

EEM410 Description

This module provides students the opportunity to apply the fundamental principles of fluid dynamics and enables them to analyse and design water infrastructure.

Aims
The aim of this module is to enable students apply the principles of hydraulics relevant to water engineering.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse and design pipeline systems for fluid flow.
2. Analyse and design simple foul and storm runoff drainage networks.
3. Understand basic concepts in hydraulic machines and design and analyse pump-pipe systems.
4. Analyse and design open channel and hydraulic infrastructures.

Indicative Content
1. Fluid Dynamics
Review of basic concepts of fluid motion. Continuity equations, conservation of mass, steady flow; the Bernoulli equations: application to devices; the momentum equation.
2. Pipeline
Pipe flow and Reynolds number. Frictional effects in pipe flow and Darcy head loss equation. Analysis of pipe systems - use design aids: flow charts, computational packages.
3. Drainage systems
Combined and separate sewer systems. Urban storm water pollution control. CSOs. Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems. Estimation of foul and storm flows. Design of simple systems for foul and surface water.
4. Hydraulic Machines
Types of hydraulic machines. Selection and installation of pumps, using pump and system performance curves. Cavitation and associated issues.
5. Open channels uniform flow
Frictional resistance formulae for steady uniform flow in open channels. Channel design considerations, including optimum shape of cross-section for uniform flow in open channels.
6. Non-uniform flow in open channels
Specific energy and alternative depths of flow. Occurrence of critical flow conditions. Flow over a broad-crested weir. Classification of water surface profiles. The hydraulic jump and the use of critical depth in flow measurements. Design of spillways.

Fitness, Nutrition and Health - Semester 1

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Fitness, Nutrition and Health course.

Module 1: FOD205 Nutrition through the Lifespan

Module 2: SPS203 Key Concepts in Sport and Exercise Physiology

Module 3: SPS207 Placement and skill development when working with children in a physical activity context

FOD205 Description

In this module nutrient needs, nutritional status and associated nutritional issues are explored using a lifespan model.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of life-cycle nutritional needs, the importance of suitable food choices to meet these needs and the potential influence of early diet and food choice on health throughout the lifespan.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Explain nutritional requirements at different stages of the lifespan.
2. Discuss the relationship between diet and health status at different life stages.
3. Evaluate factors that may affect nutritional status throughout the lifecycle.
4. Apply practical guidelines for menu planning and food preparation provision relevant to different stages of the lifespan

Indicative Content
1. Nutrition during the lifecycle
2. Nutrition during pregnancy and lactation
3. Nutrition during infancy
4. Nutrition in childhood
5. Nutrition in adolescence
6. Nutrition in adulthood
7. Nutrition in aging
8. Nutrition and sports

SPS203 Description

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the core concepts of sport and exercise physiology and the application to performance, exercise and health.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of core bioenergetic processes related to sport, exercise and health.
2. . Explain the role of the endocrine system in exercise and performance.
3. Explain the cardiovascular and respiratory response during exercise.
4. 4. Develop an understanding of fatigue and lactate metabolism in relation to exercise performance.
5. Develop key skills in research through data collection, analysis and interpretation.

Indicative Content
1. Fundamentals of bioenergetics
Students will explore the core concepts of energy production during exercise, examining the interaction of the different energy systems during exercise and how these change with inactivity.
2. Regulation of energy systems
Students will learn about hormonal and neural factors that influence the availability and regulation of fuel metabolism at rest and during exercise in health and disease.
3. Cardiovascular and respiratory system in sport and exercise
Students will learn about the determinants of exercising muscle oxygenation and its regulation by the cardiovascular and respiratory system, the regulation of arterial blood pressure during exercise and the interaction between oxygenation and arterial blood pressure.
4. Fatigue
Students will develop an understanding of both neuromuscular and skeletal muscle fatigue and the potential mechanisms resulting in the development of fatigue.
5. Physiological Testing
Students will explore a number of physiological tests that are used routinely for health assessment, developing an understanding of the tests and their limitations. Students will also learn how to carry out different physiological tests and analyse and interpret the results.

SPS207 Description

This module will give students the opportunity to lead, develop and/or support the delivery of physical activity sessions to school pupils in Dundee. Students will also have an opportunity to engage with a range of employers from the Sport and Fitness industry to gain insight into the requirements of particular roles. These experiences should enable the student to develop a career plan for future employment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : an opportunity to apply and/or understand the application of theory in real world practice settings and to reflect on and articulate the development of their leadership, communication, organisation and management skills. The module will provide the student with opportunities to make a more informed choice about their future degree pathway, to determine career goals and to plan their progress toward achieving these goals

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Reflect on their leadership, communication, organisation and management skills; identify areas for development, and opportunities by which to do this.
2. Deliver and/or support activity sessions for children in the community and articulate how this activity is contributing to their future career aspirations.
3. Articulate their skills, strengths, experiences and achievements to a prospective employer.
4. Understand the demands associated with different professions within the sport and fitness industry.
5. Reflect on these demands in evaluating personal learning and development in the context of career planning.

Indicative Content
1. Planning and delivering activity sessions
Session planning; managing time/resources/people; working within a team; Active Schools/Positive Coaching Scotland training; managing challenging behaviour; developing diversity competence; Growth Mindset; contemporary issues in the sport and fitness industry.
2. Personal Development Planning (PDP)
Completing SWOT analyses; personal objective/goal setting; action planning; electronic PDPs.
3. Reflective practice
Application of models of reflective practice; guided reflection to highlight learning; making theory− practice links; career planning.
4. Articulating skill development
Using electronic platforms and oral media to promote knowledge and skills to external audiences in the context of employability; careers/external speaker workshops.

Fitness, Nutrition and Health - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Fitness, Nutrition and Health course.

Module 1: FOD201 Public Health Nutrition and Health Promotion 1

Module 2: SPS204 Social Science of Physical Activity and Health

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Fitness, Nutrition and Health course.

Module 1: SPS309 Physical Activity and Health Promotion

Module 2: SPS311 Physiology of Obesity and Non-communicable Diseases

Module 3: SPS312 Research Methods

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

FOD201 Description

This module covers the concepts of public health, development of public health policy and key public health issues. It will provide also the fundamentals of epidemiology.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : an understanding of public health and an appreciation of the relationship between health care politics, policy making and population health.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Appraise Health Promotion models and interventions.
2. Discuss implementation of food and nutrition policy in a range of community settings.
3. Explain the main principles of epidemiology.

Indicative Content
1. Food & Nutrition policy
Framework of national and local policy and guidelines; models of good practice.
2. Health policy and public health
What is health policy? State intervention in health. Development of Green Papers/White Papers/Guidelines for health/Targets and implementation. Influences of global health policy. Structure of public health agencies.
3. Policy Implementation
Implementation of food and nutrition policy in educational establishments, community food initiatives, local authorities and health services.
4. Fundamentals of epidemiology
e.g. concept, measuring disease frequency, study designs for public health.

SPS204 Description

This module introduces the student to social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of key social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and describe disciplines within the study of physical activity and health that are associated with the social sciences.
2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of key issues in physical activity and health.
3. Identify key structures and governing bodies/policies associated with health and physical activity.
4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of methodologies associated with physical activity and health and what they help us to learn/explain.

Indicative Content
1. Interdisciplinary nature of social sciences
Students will explore the ways in which various disciplines within social science help us to understand and explain issues relating to physical activity and health (e.g., sociology of sport, sociology of health and illness, epidemiology, sport development, sport history)
2. Critically engage with the notion of ‘healthy’ lifestyles
Students will question the construction of ‘healthy’ living
3. Research topics within the social sciences
Students will make connections between the approaches/findings of physical activity and health research and how these inform debates around agency− structure
4. Political Ideology and Social Inequalities
Students will question the ways in which health and physical activity participation are framed by political ideologies and consider how and why this influences social inequalities
5. Qualitative methodologies
Students will be introduced to qualitative research and how it has developed our understanding of physical activity and health.

SPS309 Description

This module introduces the student to health issues high on the policy agenda and the ways in which participation in physical activity can be and is promoted as a way of addressing these issues.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the students with an understanding of the complexities of health promotion and the potential for participation in physical activity to both alleviate and exacerbate contemporary health issues.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the concept of health and health promotion.
2. Critically discuss the importance of promoting physical activity in contemporary society.
3. Explain how health promotion interventions may often exacerbate existing health inequalities.
4. Appraise a physical activity intervention in relation to its potential impact on health inequalities.

Indicative Content
1. Defining Health
Students will understand the different ways in which health can and will be defined
2. Complexity of health promotion in contemporary Society
Students will explore the ways in which health promotion has the potential to both reduce and exacerbate existing social inequalities
3. Physical activity, its determinants and importance for health promotion
Students will develop a critical understanding of what factors influence physical activity and its fundamental role in health promotion
4. Critical Engagement with the Obesity ‘Epidemic’
Students will develop a critical understanding of why obesity is prioritised on the health policy agenda
5. Health promotion, physical activity and the environment
Students will explore the environmental factors that influence the promotion of health and physical activity participation

SPS311 Description

This module will cover the aetiology, physiology and pathophysiology of obesity and the principal non-communicable diseases.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge of obesity and a selection of non-communicable diseases that affect the human body and how these conditions impact upon lifestyle and lifespan.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically discuss the major pathophysiological processes and underlying mechanisms of obesity and a range of non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer.
2. Describe the symptoms, prevalence, morbidity, mortality, and risk factors associated with the examined conditions.
3. Identify and evaluate the importance of physical activity in the prevention and management of the human conditions covered.
4. Critically analyse and evaluate scientific research publications in the area.

Indicative Content
1. Pathophysiology of Obesity
Critical overview of the pathophysiology of obesity and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.
2. Pathophysiology of Type II Diabetes
Critical overview of the pathophysiology of Type II Diabetes and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.
3. Pathophysiology of Cardiovascular
Critical overview of the pathophysiology of Cardiovascular disease and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.
4. Pathophysiology of Cancer
Critical overview of the pathophysiology of cancer and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.

SPS312 Description

This module will develop students’ ideas about research in sport, exercise, physical activity and health, enabling them to better understand and appreciate published research and design their own research project.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to design and carry out a research project (in their final year of study).

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify, refine and rationalise a suitable and appropriate research question
2. Critique published literature in the field of sport, exercise, physical activity and/or health
3. Construct an appropriate and ethical research design
4. Obtain practical research skills in preparation for data collection and analysis

Indicative Content
1. The research process
Students will learn and engage in a research process by which they will come to understand the steps associated with planning and conducting a research process.
2. Formulating and refining research questions
Students will learn how research ideas are questions are generated and refined.
3. Research methodologies
Students will be exposed to various research methodologies (e.g., quantitative, qualitative and mixed−methods) in order to develop an appreciation of diverse approaches to research in sport, exercise, physical activity and health.
4. Ethical issues
Students will develop an awareness of the key ethical issues associated with research in sport, exercise, physical activity and health.
5. Practical skill development
Students will be given opportunities to develop their practical research skills in their chosen discipline area.

Food Science & Nutrition - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Food and Consumer Science and Food, Nutrition and Health courses.

Module 1: FOD203 Food Design and Promotion

Module 2: FOD205 Nutrition through the Lifespan

Module 3: FOD206 Properties of Food

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Food and Consumer Science course.

Module 1: FOD307 Professional skills for placement and research

Module 2: FOD303 Food Processing

Module 3: FOD306 Quality And Safety Management Systems

Option 3

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Food, Nutrition and Health course.

Module 1: FOD307 Professional skills for placement and research

Module 2: FOD304 Food and Behaviour

Module 3: FOD305 Clinical Nutrition 1

FOD203 Description

A practical based module in which students develop an understanding of functionality of food ingredients and develop food handling skills and apply them in the design and promotion of multi component food recipes

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of how food ingredients interact with each other, to develop the knowledge and skills to make and modify complex food products, and to develop confidence in presenting and promoting food.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Develop knowledge of the functionality of ingredients in foods.
2. Apply skills and techniques to modify foods and create alternatives to fulfil a specified brief
3. Plan and develop a multicomponent recipe and present a food demonstration justifying ingredient choice and functionality.
4. Understand underpinning food science and nutrition

Indicative Content
1. Fundamental Food Handling and demonstration Skills
Fundamental food handling skills and understanding of how ingredients interact in recipes. Develop ability to modify recipes in order to confidently prepare and demonstrate multi-component recipes
2. Theoretical underpinning of recipe development for specific groups
Food Ingredients, recipe modification and recipe writing, nutritional guidelines Food demonstration skills

FOD205 Description

In this module nutrient needs, nutritional status and associated nutritional issues are explored using a lifespan model.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of life-cycle nutritional needs, the importance of suitable food choices to meet these needs and the potential influence of early diet and food choice on health throughout the lifespan.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Explain nutritional requirements at different stages of the lifespan.
2. Discuss the relationship between diet and health status at different life stages.
3. Evaluate factors that may affect nutritional status throughout the lifecycle.
4. Apply practical guidelines for menu planning and food preparation provision relevant to different stages of the lifespan

Indicative Content
1. Nutrition during the lifecycle
2. Nutrition during pregnancy and lactation
3. Nutrition during infancy
4. Nutrition in childhood
5. Nutrition in adolescence
6. Nutrition in adulthood
7. Nutrition in aging
8. Nutrition and sports

FOD206 Description

This module develops the understanding of physicochemical characteristics and functionalities of macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins and lipids) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) and their changes during freezing, cooking and processing. The functionalities and applications of commonly used food additives are included. This module also develops basic chemistry laboratory and scientific writing skills.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the students an understanding of physicochemical characteristics and functionalities of different food components and their interactions during, freezing, cooking and processing which lead to changes in appearance, texture, flavour and nutrient contents

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Compare the physical structure and chemical nature of different food components, and functional properties of the food components and additives.
2. Explain the physicochemical changes and interactions of different food components during freezing, cooking and processing and their effects on food characteristics and nutritional values.
3. Conduct scientific experiments to observe, collect, statistically analyse and interpret data of chemical changes in food.
4. Demonstrate competent lab report writing skills.

Indicative Content
1. Basic chemistry
2. Chemical structure and physicochemical properties of water, macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins and lipids) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals)
Chemical structure and physicochemical properties of water, macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins and lipids) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals)
3. Physiochemical and nutritional changes of macronutrients and micronutrients during freezing, cooking and processing
Physiochemical and nutritional changes of macronutrients and micronutrients during freezing, cooking and processing
4. Food additives – functionalities and applications
Food additives – functionalities and applications
5. Basic food analysis techniques
Basic food analysis techniques

FOD307 Description

This module is aimed at preparing the student for the Placement period and for research skills.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an opportunity to reflect on their current professional competencies and develop their professional/research skills and knowledge further.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Develop autonomy in prioritising areas of own learning specific to subject area
2. Demonstrate competency in experimental design and data handling
3. Develop employability by different methods including presentation techniques and evidence of achievements
4. Plan to undertake a 10 week placement within a relevant organisation

Indicative Content
1. Briefing sessions
Issues re: induction, confidentiality, Health and Safety, realistic expectations and assessment. Prior to start of placement the student, employer and placement tutor will agree task(s) involved in the learning opportunities to be developed and expected outcomes.
2. Learning Objectives
Identify and justify own learning objectives prior to undertaking placement
3. CV Writing and Interview Skills and Techniques
4. Development of reflective learning techniques
5. Data Handling and Numeracy Skills
Basic statistics for food science: parametric tests: t tests, (independent, one sample, paired t-tests, Shapiro wilks normality test, Levene’s homogeneity of variance test); non parametric tests: Kruscal Wallis, Mann Whitney test; linear regression, test for associations

FOD303 Description

This module introduces the student to the basic unit operations and food processing technologies used in food and drink manufacturing industry.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the necessary knowledge and skills to enable students to critically evaluate processing and preserving technologies used in the food and drink manufacturing industry.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Develop typical process flow diagrams for food products and have a comprehensive understanding of the unit operations employed
2. Evaluate a range of food manufacturing and processing methods
3. Critically discuss innovative technologies within the food industry
4. Evaluate the steps involved in the commercial manufacture of complex food products
5. Efficiently work in small teams (fully engaging in Peer teaching and learning) and understanding the key points of a given processing challenge

Indicative Content
Basic processing concepts for example: Heat transfer; thermal properties of food, modes of heat transfer, modes of heating; mass balance; flow of liquids; size reduction and mixing

FOD306 Description

The module deals with issues related to the management of food safety and quality systems in food environments, throughout the food supply chain

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the principles and the application of food safety and hygiene management systems and methodologies.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Justify the principles of HACCP in the food supply chain; i.e. the importance of it within the food industry
2. Ascertain the application of risk assessment methodologies in the quantification of hazards
3. Critically analyse the key components of food safety failures from an economic, health and societal point of view.
4. Critique food manufacturers use of quality management systems, including quality standards.
5. Determine the food legislation issues and controls related to food safety

Indicative Content
1. Contamination of foods and its prevention
Bacteriology, physical, chemical and microbiological contamination of food and its prevention. Carry out risk analysis, identify hazards and indicate suitable controls;
2. Safety management
Assessment of existing HACCP plans, design and implementation of new HACCP plans and safety management systems;
3. Legislation and other requirements
Food Safety Act 1990, EC Regulations, Food Hygiene (Scotland) Regulations, FSA, European Food Safety Authority, BRC and ISO standards, hygienic design of food premises

FOD304 Description

A practical module providing research tools and theoretical enquiry into consumer orientated reasons for poor dietary choices and the potential technical and psychological solutions.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide students with the ability to critically investigate the underlying consumer issues for a number of nutrition related public health issues

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate, from an evidence base, food-related public health concerns from a consumer perspective
2. Appraise the role of epidemiological, psychological and physiological factors that prevent consumers making healthy food choices
3. Have a working knowledge of different methodologies to examine factors involved in food choice
4. Appraise the usefulness of technological strategies to support better consumer food choices

Indicative Content
1. Satiety/obesity and CVD explored in terms of drivers of consumption: 
Genetic and ageing differences in sensory perception explored. Supertasters (bitter reception/ fat taste – CD36) Chewing strategies and satietyBiomarkers, hormones and receptors e.g. satiety Cognitive factors] Sociological approach
2. Research methods: Methodological review of techniques – strengths and weaknesses. e.g. Attitudinal scoring does it predict behaviour ? Working knowledge on a variety of techniques Basic report writing skills. Accuracy, Data presentation and analysis, Experimental critique, and Report Structure
3. Solutions/interventions: Psychological, medical and technical solutions investigated

FOD305 Description

This module provide the students with knowledge about interactions of nutrients with other components (non-nutrient food components; gene and drug interactions). The module gives also information about methods used for assessment of the nutritional status and an introduction to nutritional genomics.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding about different factors that can interfere with nutrients in the body.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate the interaction nutrient / non-nutrient food components of food and their metabolic activity
2. Discuss nutrient-drug interaction & nutrient-gene interaction
3. Critically evaluate laboratory / biochemical parameters used to assess nutritional status

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to nutritional genomics
1.1 – Genetic fundamentals 1.2 – Genetics and Nutrition (Nutrigenomics & Nutrigenetics)
2. Food-Drug interactions
2.1 – Drug use and nutritional Status 2.2 – Drug effects on Food and Nutrients 2.3 – Food and Nutrient effects on drugs 2.4 – Alcohol (as a drug)- absorption, metabolism and effects on health
3. Non-nutrient components in foods
3.1 – Bioactives and their metabolic activity 3.2 – Main Classes of anti-nutrients and their effect on nutrient’s bioavailability 3.3 – Adverse reactions to Food/Food components
4. Functional Foods
4.1 – Definition of Functional Foods and their health benefits 4.2 – Functional Foods (Prebiotics and Probiotics) 4.3 - Functional Components
5. Laboratory data in nutrition assessment
5.1 – Indicators of Protein-Energy Malnutrition (undernutrition- starvation and chronic undernutrition) 5.2 – Inflammation and Biochemical Assessment 5.3 – Markers of vitamins status (overview of function and deficiency) 5.4 – Markers of iron status (overview of function and deficiency)

Food Science & Nutrition - Semester 2

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Food and Consumer Science and Food, Nutrition and Health courses.

Module 1: FOD204 Food Characterisation

Module 2: FOD201 Public Health Nutrition and Health Promotion 1

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

FOD204 Description

Analysis of food and drink is a major activity for the industry and a very important part of product development and quality assurance. This module introduces the student to the techniques required to test food using analytical, physicochemical and sensory analysis techniques.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : the necessary knowledge and skills to enable students to apply a range of analytical and sensory techniques to evaluate food and drink.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Choose and apply a range of food analyses techniques used for the physicochemical characterisation of foods, identification of chemicals or contaminants in foods.
2. Design and implement appropriate sensory tests for a range of food products
3. Analyse and present data obtained during food analysis and draw appropriate conclusions

Indicative Content
1. Physicochemical characterisation of foods
pH and titratible acidity, salt analysis using flame photometry, water content and water activity, colorimetry, turbidity measurement, texture analysis using empirical instruments (bostwick consistometer, texture analyser)
2. Spectrophotometry, Chromatography and mass spectrometry
3. Sensory evaluation techniques (discrimination tests, ranking, descriptive and affective testing including accompanying statistics)
4. Method development for NPD, quality control and quality assurance

FOD201 Description

This module covers the concepts of public health, development of public health policy and key public health issues. It will provide also the fundamentals of epidemiology.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of public health and an appreciation of the relationship between health care politics, policy making and population health.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Appraise Health Promotion models and interventions.
2. Discuss implementation of food and nutrition policy in a range of community settings.
3. Explain the main principles of epidemiology.

Indicative Content
1. Food & Nutrition policy
Framework of national and local policy and guidelines; models of good practice.
2. Health policy and public health
What is health policy? State intervention in health. Development of Green Papers/White Papers/Guidelines for health/Targets and implementation. Influences of global health policy. Structure of public health agencies.
3. Policy Implementation
Implementation of food and nutrition policy in educational establishments, community food initiatives, local authorities and health services.
4. Fundamentals of epidemiology
e.g. concept, measuring disease frequency, study designs for public health.

Forensic Sciences - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Forensic Sciences course.

Module 1: FOR201 Advanced Chemical Processes

Module 2: LAW253 Criminal Law and Evidence

Module 3: FOR205 Forensic Human Identification

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Forensic Sciences course.

Module 1: FOR301 Special Topics in Forensic Biology

Module 2: FOR303 Forensic Chromatography and Spectroscopy

Module 3: FOR305 Forensic Material Investigation

FOR201 Description

This module further develops knowledge of chemical properties and principles relating to chemical and biological systems

Aims
The aim of this module is to build upon the basic concepts of kinetics, energetics, stereochemistry, organic functional groups, inorganic chemistry and biological chemistry to provide a deeper understanding of their application to Forensic and Biological Chemistry

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the mechanisms of organic transformations
2. Relate elemental types to chemical and physical processes
3. Apply the concepts of reaction kinetics, energetics and equilibria to selected chemical and biological processes
4. Perform practical exercises, record manipulate and interpret data and explain experimental outcomes by relating them to theory and concepts

Indicative Content
1. Organic and biochemistry
Aromatic and heteroaromatic chemistry. Mechanistic description of organic chemical transformations. Shape properties and interactions of biological macromolecules. Polymer chemistry
2. Inorganic Chemistry
Introduction to metallurgy. Principles of redox titrations. Electronic spectra of elements and their implications and applications. Organometallic chemistry. Catalytic processes
3. Physical Chemistry
Advanced chemical kinetics and it’s application to chemical processes. Michaelis-Menten kinetics, estimation of Vmax and Km, principles of enzyme catalysis. Ideal and real gas behaviour, vapour pressure of mixtures, Raoult's Law, Henry's Law, and activity coefficients, ebullioscopy, cryoscopy and phase diagrams.

LAW253 Description

This module allows students to acquire then develop knowledge and understanding of the principles of Scots criminal law and the law of evidence in Scotland.

Aims
The aim of this module is to identify and examine the principles of Scots criminal law and evidence.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the Scottish legal system differentiate civil and criminal law. Understand the sources of law, locating the law and general principles of criminal law.
2. Identify and explain the elements to be proved in crimes:against the person,of dishonesty, against property, in relation to public order and morality,against the state and administration of justice
3. Distinguish between strict liability offences and cases where criminal intent must be shown;
4. Understand and apply the rules of evidence concerning relevance, admissibility, weight and sufficiency of evidence;
5. Understand and apply the legal concepts of corroboration and of competence and compellability of witnesses as they apply in Scots Law;
6. Understand the differences between witnesses as to fact and expert witnesses. Demonstrate skills of comprehension and application of legal principle.

Indicative Content
1. Crimes against the Person
Assault and aggravations of assault, homicide; defences.
2. Crimes of Dishonesty
Theft; robbery; fraud; defences.
3. Crimes relating to Public Order and Morality
Breach of the peace; public indecency; defences.
4. Crimes against Property
Malicious mischief; vandalism; defences.
5. Principles of criminal liability
Basic principles of criminal liability; inchoate crimes; art and part liability; causation.
6. Basic Concepts of Evidence and Requirements for proof
Relevance, admissibility, weight and sufficiency of evidence; Burdens and standards of proof; presumptions.
7. Types of Evidence and Corroboration
Oral, documentary, real evidence, direct and circumstantial, primary and secondary evidence;'best evidence'; the common law rules in criminal proceedings, The Moorov doctrine; admissions and confessions, corroboration by distress.
8. Competence and compellability of witnesses
Parties, accused, spouses, co-accused, children and other vulnerable witnesses. Privilege. Evidence of character.
9. Opinion and Expert Evidence; Hearsay; Evidence at the Trial
Expert and Opinion evidence; ss 259-262 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995; res gestae and de recenti statements; conduct of inquiry (examination in chief, cross-examination and re-examination).

FOR205 Description

This module will focus on the INTERPOL Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) process and introduce students to the use of biometric information, not just for personal security, but also in a forensic capacity for the purposes of human identification.

Aims
The aims of this module are to provide students with a knowledge and understanding of biometric information, and how it can be used in a forensic capacity for human identification, and to develop an understanding of the INTERPOL Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) process.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Discuss the use of biometric data and its role in human identification, particularly in the context of criminal investigation and mass fatality incidents.
2. Demonstrate a sound knowledge and awareness of the INTERPOL Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) process
3. Discuss the process of post mortem (PM) examinations and their value in forensic investigations
4. Recognise the importance of a systematic approach to the identification of disaster victims
5. Produce appropriate documentation for forensic productions related to DVI

Indicative Content
1. Biometric Human Identifiers
Application of biometric information for both personal security and human identification purposes. Biometric evidence recovery from a crime scene and/or victim. Specialised and emerging biometric data. Links to current biometric databases
2. INTERPOL DVI
Introduction to the INTERPOL Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) process, recognising the four stages, the classification of disasters and understanding the identification criteria required to enable reconciliation.
3. Body Recovery and Mortuary Procedures
Describe and acknowledge the roles and responsibilities of the post mortem (PM) examination team. Recognise the sequence of a PM examination, the purpose and evidential value of samples recovered and how these items of evidence are preserved through integrity and continuity.

FOR301 Description

This module provides an introduction to the identification and confirmation of body fluids in forensic biology casework and the scientific interpretation of blood stain patterns. The contribution of further selected areas of the biological sciences to specialised aspects of forensic science is also critically evaluated.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of examination strategies for the range of body fluids encountered in forensic biology casework together with the science underpinning the interpretation of bloodstain patterns. An awareness of the contribution of selected areas of the biological sciences to specialised forensic science studies is also given.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the rationale for undertaking different body fluid examinations as an aid to crime investigation.
2. Relate the biological characteristics of different body fluids to the methods used for location and identification in the forensic laboratory.
3. Identify and interpret bloodstain patterns and relate these to a theoretical treatment of blood dynamics.
4. Have a basic understanding of how the results of biological examinations are used in the context of case interpretation.
5. Analyse and critically evaluate the contribution of selected areas of biology to specialised aspects of forensic science.

Indicative Content
1. Body Fluids
Methods for detection and confirmation of the presence of blood, saliva, semen, faeces and urine. Interpretation of the presence and distribution of such staining and an understanding of body fluid persistence.
2. Blood Dynamics and Blood Stain Patterns
Rheology of blood and blood behaviour. Impact, cast- off, arterial and transfer patterns, interpretation and evidential value.
3. Selected Areas of Biology Relevant to Forensic Science
For example: aspects of entomology, trichology and other specialist areas of forensic biology may be considered.

FOR303 Description

To further understand the theoretical basis for chromatography and to use spectroscopic techniques to identify organic compounds 

Aims
The aim of this module is to enable the student to understand and apply the theory and practicalities behind chromatographic techniques used in forensic science and to use spectroscopic techniques to identify unknown organic compounds. 

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe the theory of and techniques used to separate organic components 
2. Explain how separation techniques are used in forensic science 
3. Analyse spectroscopic data to obtain plausible structures for unknown organic compounds 
4. Carry out organic separations and analyses in the laboratory in a safe and efficient manner 

Indicative Content
1. Chromatography
Methods of separation; paper chromatography; column chromatography; chromatograms-integration, calibration, response factors; HPLC; GC; GC-MS; LC-MS.  Thermodynamic and kinetic principles of separation.
2. Spectroscopy
Near Infrared spectroscopy; Mid Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance; mass spectrometry; uv-vis spectroscopy. 
3. Problem Solving
Use of a range of spectroscopic data to provide rational structures for selected organic compounds. Forensic Science related case studies, such as the analysis and identification of fire accelerants or drugs of abuse. 
4. Laboratory Techniques
Carry out a range of separation and spectroscopic techniques in the laboratory on forensic related samples. 

FOR305 Description

Examines the investigation, evaluation & interpretation of evidence from fires & explosions. It examines causes of fire, thermodynamics of combustion, sample collection & packaging, chemical tests & analytical techniques for fire debris analysis. It explores the nature of explosives & explosions, blast wave propagation, damage caused & the forensic evidence as well as firearms evidence and metallurgical failures, and considers the approaches from the crime scene to court presentation and interpretation.

Aims
The aims of this module are to enable the student to: (i) examine and characterise the origin of fire/explosion debris; (ii) evaluate techniques for distinguishing residues, (iii) identify the source and subsequent history of samples, (iv) understand the principles of kinetics/dynamics, energetics, phase transfer, and (v) the interpretation and understanding of materials and failures

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Apply the principles of kinetics and thermodynamics to fires and explosions
2. Interpret findings of fire investigations in relation to fire dynamics
3. Characterise explosives and fire debris
4. Describe and evaluate forensic firearm and ballistic examinations
5. Evaluate the mechanisms of material failures.
6. Critically interpret experimental observations and relate them to theory and practice

Indicative Content
1. Fire and Explosion Dynamics
Heat transfer mechanisms, ignition and spread of flame, spontaneous and smouldering combustion, pre-and post-flash-over fires, smoke movement, buoyancy, fuel load.
2. Thermochemistry of Fuels and Explosives
Combustion and energy release, oxygen balance and the Kistiakowsky−Wilson rules, Hess's law, heat and temperature of explosion, the concept of heat capacity.
3. Explosion and Fire Debris analysis
Explosives classification, factors affecting detonation. Debris position, identification of mechanical, thermal history and origin. Use of chemical tests to identify potential explosive residues and accelerants. Fire cause diagnosis, identification of origin of fire and source of ignition.
4. Properties of Physical Evidence Materials
Microstructure and micro properties of metals and alloys, fracture fatigue and creep. Corrosion mechanisms. Metallurgical examination of failures.
5. Interpretation of results
Introduction to evidence interpretation and the reporting of physical evidence cases.

Forensic Sciences - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Forensic Sciences course.

Module 1: FOR212 Investigative Analytical Science

Module 2: LSC201 Molecular Biology and Genetics

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of BSc Forensic Sciences course.

Module 1: FOR304 Forensic Trace Evidence

Module 2: FOR310 Forensic Pharmacology and Toxicology

Module 3: FOR312 Scene Examination and Management

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

FOR212 Description

A module designed to teach basic analytical skills and the theory behind these techniques, and to relate them to forensic and biomedical applications

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of basic analytical techniques.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Select, describe and apply analytical methods
2. Apply, interpret and report statistical tests for data analysis
3. Carry out a range of specified analyses

Indicative Content
1. Quality
Sample custody and traceability. Data interpretation and reporting.
2. Sample Preparation
Sampling. Drying. Crushing. Weighing. Dissolution. Separation and concentration.
3. Spectroscopy
Electromagnetic radiation and the nature of light. Beer Lambert law. Theory of spectroscopy. Instrumentation. UV-visible, IR and AAS spectroscopy. Presumptive tests. Spectroscopic
4. Theory and Principles of Chromatography
Introduction to TLC.
5. Immunotechnology
Diagnostic and detection systems based on antibody-antigen interaction: RIA, ELISA, Agglutination, Precipitation reactions. Direct, Indirect and sandwich assays. Use of serological methods in diagnosis of infectious diseases and forensic applications such as body fluid identification

LSC201 Description

This module provides an introduction to both Medical and Forensic genetics and uses specific examples, to highlight the importance of DNA analyses, in both fields.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the fundamental concepts in molecular biology and genetics, together with relevant skills.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Explain the architecture, expression of human genes which are important in determining health, disease and forensically useful phenotypes.
2. Discuss both clinical and forensic genetic variation in the context of human genomics.
3. Deploy molecular genetic laboratory and bioinformatic analytical techniques.

Indicative Content
1. Genes and gene expression
Structure of human genes. Control of gene expression, with an emphasis on variations in genes that cause both medical conditions and common, forensically useful human traits. Splicing and differential gene expression. Common human variations and Mutations, including point mutations, indels, repeat expansions, and chromosomal aberrations.
2. Human Genomics and bioinformatic analysis
Sequence architecture of the human genome. Chromosome structure. DNA sequencing methods: Focusing on the comparison of the dideoxy irreversible terminator method of Sanger, with the “next generation” reversible terminator method of Balasubramanian and Klenerman. Analysis of sequence data. Genetic variation: the human gene pool, population genetics including Hardy-Weinberg equilibria.
3. Genetic engineering and other analytical techniques
Basic cloning including restriction digestion, ligation and transfection. PCR, Gel and capillary electrophoresis and accurate sizing of DNA fragments.

FOR304 Description

This module examines the value and limitations of selected trace evidence types in criminal investigations and considers the main trace evidence materials of glass, paint and fibres from the initial case assessment and laboratory analysis through to evaluation and presentation of trace evidence in court.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide an enhanced understanding of the evidential value of common trace evidence materials in criminal investigations through the development of an understanding of material composition together with the adoption of appropriate analytical and statistical processes.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Predict & explain the composition of common trace evidence materials & understand the need for contamination avoidance & adoption of quality systems & processes within a trace evidence laboratory.
2. Appraise and characterise the main trace evidence types.
3. Appreciate traditional statistical techniques and typical difficulties and limitations encountered during trace evidence evaluation using both classical and Bayesian style approaches.
4. Research, implement and manage correctly a range of analytical procedures appropriate to trace evidence analysis. Interpret and present the findings of laboratory trace evidence examinations.

Indicative Content
1. General Concepts of Trace Evidence:
Scope, recognition, recovery, case assessment, analysis, interpretation and presentation. Importance of discriminatory analytical methods, use of controls, sampling, reference materials, contamination avoidance, quality processes in the trace evidence laboratory, traceability, databases, frequency of occurrence, classical and Bayesian style interpretation and evaluation of evidence.
2. Composition and Properties of Common Trace Evidence Materials:
Composition, properties & where appropriate general processes used in the manufacture & colouring of glass/paints/manmade & natural fibres. Appreciation of different analytical processes appropriate to trace evidence examinations & some of the quality issues surrounding lab trace evidence exams. The use of groupings & t tests in the statistical analysis of data together with the limitations of such approaches & the use of continuous Bayesian style statistics in the evaluation of trace evidence.
3. Characterisation of Common Trace Evidence Materials:
Laboratory characterisation of glass, paints and fibres, use of various microscopic techniques in the comparison/discrimination of different trace evidence materials. Introduction to evidence interpretation and reporting of trace evidence laboratory casework; quality control, quality assurance, proficiency testing.

FOR310 Description

This module is designed to promote a detailed appreciation of the effects of toxins and drugs on human systems and the approaches to their detection and quantification in accidental and deliberate poisonings. The syllabus will be based around mammalian toxicology with a predominant focus on human examples.

Aims
To provide the student with a detailed appreciation of the interactions between organism and toxicants, and their subsequent effects at molecular, cellular and higher levels of organisation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the principles of human pharmacology and toxicology, and of the chemical, cellular and physiological factors that affect the toxicity of compounds.
2. Discuss the role of pharmacology and toxicology in forensic and environmental investigations, and the range of common drugs and toxicants encountered.
3. Relate the kinetic and dynamic properties of common drugs and toxicants to the forensic evaluation and clinical management of accidental or deliberate poisonings.
4. Critically appraise the range of techniques and approaches for sample collection/handling; screening and confirmatory tests; and assessment, interpretation and recording of toxicological data

Indicative Content
1. Mechanisms of drug action and pharmacodynamics.
This will include; receptor signalling; agonists antagonists. Drug− receptor binding and interaction. Examples will be drawn from central nervous system (CNS) receptors, adrenergic cholinergic receptors/neurotransmission.
2. Pharmacokinetics
Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME). Routes of administration and the implications for drug/toxin effect, and the distribution/dispersion of drug/toxins, phase I II metabolism, biotransformation. – including bioactivation. Elimination/Excretion. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting ADME (such as pharmacogenetics). Introduction to quantitative elimination/back−calculation. Case studies.
3. Poisoning Symptoms
Toxicity, Toxidromes and the Treatment of Poisoning.
4. Forensic investigations
History of Forensic Toxicology. Areas of Forensic Toxicology. Environmental Toxicology. Sample types: Advantages, Disadvantages; Sample handling. Screening and confirmatory tests. Post−mortem toxicology. Toxicological reports.
5. Topic case studies.
Case studies based on real clinical, environmental and forensic toxicological cases.

FOR312 Description

This module explores some of the advanced principles of and techniques used in Forensic Science as well as the roles of Forensic Scientists. This will include higher level forensic practical skills involved in the investigation, searching and examination of crime scenes, as well as the examination techniques utilised in the examination of some of the evidence types found at crime scenes

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the ability to evaluate, examine and understand the process, management and control of crime scenes, along with the techniques and methodology of crime scene investigation and examination. As well as develop a sound understanding of the value of selected chemical and physical techniques in criminal investigations

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Assess, manage safely and secure major incident and crime scenes
2. Apply techniques of crime scene examination recording and searching
3. Locate and collect effective samples of evidence
4. Assess and interpret crime scene evidence
5. Select appropriate techniques for evidence recording, packaging and labelling to preserve and protect evidence and maintain the chain of custody of evidence
6. Produce a Court Report to record and report findings from the evidence collected at a crime scene

Indicative Content
1. Approach to Crime Scene Investigation
Roles responsibilities and liabilities of crime scene investigation and management, along with protection of the scene and co- ordination from initial assessment to scene conclusion
2. Crime Scene Examination and Searching
Methodologies of effective searching, examination of points of entry, systematic approach, use of light sources and photography. Fingerprinting techniques (e.g dusting, ninhydrin and cyanoacrylates), fingerprint identification and classification, casting techniques for toolmarks and footwear marks, footwear enhancement, comparison and identification
3. Advanced Enhancement Techniques
Application of advanced enhancement techniques of latent marks using chemical and lighting techniques, along with selection of the appropriate visualisation techniques to develop latent marks on various substrates
4. Report writing
The production of reports used to record evidence found at a scene and present evidence in court, which will follow the evidence from crime scene to court.

Psychology - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Psychology course.

Module 1: PSY205 Cognitive and Social Perspectives on Psychology

For modules 2 & 3, choose 2 from the following:

PSY203 Forensic Psychology: Understanding Offending Behaviour

PSY202 Psychology Mythbusters: Separating breakthroughs from fake news

SOC201 Classical Social Theory

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Psychology course.

Module 1: PSY301 Human Variability: Psychobiology and Behaviour

For modules 2 & 3, choose 2 from the following:

PSY304 Psychology and Technology: Advanced Methods

PSY307 Psychology in the Real World

PSY309 Brain in action: from dance to trance

PSY205 Description

This module will introduce the cognitive and social aspects of the BPS core curriculum. Cognitive psychology encompasses much of what are considered ‘mental processes’. These processes range from relatively low-level processes of perception to higher level things like memory and decision making. Social psychology is the study of how we process information about others, and the biases that influence this processing. The module will combine conventional lectures on both cognitive and social psychology, supported by practical classes exposing students to experiments as participants.

Aims
The module aims to provide students with a critical and comprehensive understanding of the major topics, empirical research and theoretical approaches in cognitive and social psychology. The student will learn about how cognitive and social psychology work as sciences, and will participate in experiments to deepen their understanding.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand conceptual and historical issues in cognitive and social psychology, the origins and philosophical underpinnings.
2. Convey the major features of cognitive and social psychological processes.
3. Understand the key models and research findings in cognition and social psychology.
4. Evaluate psychological research findings.

Indicative Content
1. Conceptual and historical perspectives in cognition
Origins of research in cognition, and cognitive neuropsychology. Understanding how cognitive processes operate in different brain areas.
2. Neural architectures
Neurones, receptive fields and vision. How does the brain connect the world outside with our thoughts and experiences?
3. Conceptual and historical issues in social psychology
Defining social cognition and social behaviour. Understanding classic and contemporary approaches, and the social processing biases they reveal.
4. Pro- and anti-social behaviour
Exploring the influence of social learning on aggression and the social factors that influence helping behaviour.
5. Attitudes and social influences
Understanding attitudes and the attitude-behaviour link, routes to attitude change. Conformity and obedience.
6. Decision making and problem solving
Exploring the impact of social identity on perception and behaviour. Stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination.
7. Perception and recognition
The recognition of objects and faces.
8. Attention
Is cognition a limited resource to be allocated carefully or do we attend to everything?
9. Learning and memory
What circumstances determine how we learn new information? How is this information stored in our brains and how do we access this information while reasoning?
10. Decision making and problem solving
How do we choose responses, how do we solve problems?

PSY203 Description

Forensic psychology is a constantly growing discipline and covers an exciting and broad range of topics. This module will examine key issues in forensic psychology integrating information from clinical, biological, developmental, personality, social and cognitive psychology.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with a comprehensive overview of Forensic Psychology.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe and evaluate key developmental and genetic models of criminal psychopathology.
2. Assess the impact of environmental, family, cultural and peer influences on criminal behaviour.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of factors that increase the likelihood of serious and violent behaviour.
4. Demonstrate an awareness of risk prediction and the basis for interventions with offenders.
5. Understand methodological challenges associated with forensic psychology research.

Indicative Content
1. General Issues
Introduction to offenders, offences, victims, and the role of psychology in the actions of the police, the courts and prisons.
2. Explanatory Models of Crime and Offending
Biological factors, gender differences, individual differences, childhood and developmental issues, social and economic factors, and cognitive-behavioural approaches.
3. Developmental Basis for Criminal Behaviour
Biological basis of social, aggressive, and sexual behaviour with regard to neuropsychological, neuropharmacological and evolutionary issues. Psychological and biological treatments for childhood and adult psychopathology.
4. Mental Health and Offending
Mental health issues in offending behaviour. The relationship between mental health symptoms and risk in relation to offending. Personality disorder and schizophrenia as critical issues in serious offending.
5. Personality Abnormality
Inherited and acquired conditions in lifelong risk of criminal behaviour such as ADHD, Conduct Disorder (CD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). Examining the factors that increase the likelihood of serious sexual and violent behaviour, stalking, and criminal recidivism.
6. Substance Use and Crime
Addiction Models of criminal behaviour. Models of emotional dyscontrol in offending. The role of alcohol and drugs in serious assaultative behaviour, neuropharmcology and psychology.
7. Specific Criminal Offences
Consideration of information from specific offending populations and the psychological factors contributing to offences. Offences may include violent offending, fire raising, stalking, terrorism.
8. Sexual Offending
Detailed consideration of individual offenders and the psychological characteristics of their criminal offences and offence development in relation to sexual and violent offending.
9. Risk Assessment
Critical discussion of the role and nature of risk assessments with forensic populations including specific methods of risk assessment.
10. Treatment and Interventions
Consideration of the background to the development and application of treatments and interventions including `what works?' approaches and cognitive-behavioural treatments, as well as key issues relating to working with offenders.

PSY202 Description

This module will examine the many grandiose claims that are peddled as 'psychological fact' by the media, e.g. listening to classical music will improve a child's IQ. Many industries have been based on dubious claims about the human brain and behaviour. Here we will discuss such claims and evaluate if they have substance. The module is student-led with the cohort contributing to setting of the curriculum. The majority of taught time is small group teaching guided by an academic facilitator. Students are required to actively participate in class discussions.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with a better understanding of the difference between 'pop psychology' and scientific evaluation. It provides the opportunity to develop oral communication skills and develop a more critical reading perspective. There will also be the opportunity to develop science writing skills.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and evaluate the scientific evidence surrounding a number of popular myths about the mind and behaviour.
2. Be better placed to communicate effectively in a small group setting.
3. Write effectively and succinctly for an academic audience.
4. Develop more critical evaluation skills and to improve research and library skills.
5. Formulate and present an argument in spoken and written forms from a wide number of fields in psychology.

Indicative Content
1. Paranormal Beliefs and Experiences
Is Extrasensory Perception Real?
2. Myths about the Brain
Can repressed memories be recovered in therapy? How easily are false memories created?
3. Myths about our Mind and Body
Does “Power Posing” really work? What evidence is there for out of body experiences? Can we use our mind to cure cancer and other ailments? Is there such a thing as a 'gay gene'?
4. Myths about Language
Does being bilingual make you smarter and keep your brain younger?
5. Psychology and Society
Is our behaviour being manipulated through Behavioural Economics? What evidence is there that video games make people more violent?

SOC201 Description

This module will examine the many grandiose claims that are peddled as 'psychological fact' by the media, e.g. listening to classical music will improve a child's IQ. Many industries have been based on dubious claims about the human brain and behaviour. Here we will discuss such claims and evaluate if they have substance. The module is student-led with the cohort contributing to setting of the curriculum. The majority of taught time is small group teaching guided by an academic facilitator. Students are required to actively participate in class discussions.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with a better understanding of the difference between 'pop psychology' and scientific evaluation. It provides the opportunity to develop oral communication skills and develop a more critical reading perspective. There will also be the opportunity to develop science writing skills.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and evaluate the scientific evidence surrounding a number of popular myths about the mind and behaviour.
2. Be better placed to communicate effectively in a small group setting.
3. Write effectively and succinctly for an academic audience.
4. Develop more critical evaluation skills and to improve research and library skills.
5. Formulate and present an argument in spoken and written forms from a wide number of fields in psychology.

Indicative Content
1. Paranormal Beliefs and Experiences
Is Extrasensory Perception Real?
2. Myths about the Brain
Can repressed memories be recovered in therapy? How easily are false memories created?
3. Myths about our Mind and Body
Does “Power Posing” really work? What evidence is there for out of body experiences? Can we use our mind to cure cancer and other ailments? Is there such a thing as a 'gay gene'?
4. Myths about Language
Does being bilingual make you smarter and keep your brain younger?
5. Psychology and Society
Is our behaviour being manipulated through Behavioural Economics? What evidence is there that video games make people more violent?

PSY301 Description

This module covers core BPS curriculum and examines the links between biology and psychology. It will introduce students to the physiology that underpins observable behaviour (genetics, CNS and the endocrine system), looking at processes that exert direct control over behavioural responses and those that play a modulatory role in human psychology. The module will also provide a framework of major topics examining current research in personality and individual differences based on its historical roots and questions in prevailing applied settings.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide knowledge of how biology affects behaviour and to introduce the evolutionary mechanisms that shape our minds. It will also investigate how biology, experience and personality produce individuality in humans.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to :
1. Provide explanations of how biological and evolutionary processes influence specific cognitive and behavioural responses.
2. Critically evaluate theories and evidence that propose biological and psychological mechanisms seen in modern humans are a product of their evolutionary history.
3. Critically discuss how personality differences can be conceptualised, studied, and integrated in real life based on the main concepts and theoretical positions in current personality psychology.
4. Critically reflect upon differences between individuals during interactions and how they could be managed to achieve successful political, societal, work and environmental interventions.
5. Incorporate information gained through self-study into own knowledge- base to scaffold learning, both within biological psychology and individual differences and across psychological disciplines.

Indicative Content
1. Biological control of behaviour
How the central nervous and endocrine systems interact to produce observable behaviours such as movement, ingestion, and reproduction.
2. Psychopharmacology
Looking at the physiological consequences of taking recreational and therapeutic drugs, and biological and psychological underpinnings of drug addiction.
3. Hormones, reproduction and emotion
Examining how hormones influence mate choice, mating behaviour and sexual orientation; the biological underpinnings of emotion, emotional valence and components of the emotional response.
4. Behavioural genetics, evolutionary and sociobiology
Influences of genetics and environment on human behaviour; an introduction to the evolutionary processes that impact human and non-human animal cognition and social interactions.
5. Methodologies
Neuropsychology and neuroimaging: Looking at the physiological and behavioural effects of brain degeneration and implications for everyday life; introducing methods used in investigation of neural correlates of cognition. Psychological testing and application: Psychometric testing, specific aspects in personality tests, reliability, validity, BPS guidance.
6. Introduction to personality and individual differences
Introduction into main theories in personality and individual differences; Trait vs. State; Personality vs. Situation.
7. Intelligence
Definitions of intelligence; psychometric approaches to intelligence and their implications for educational and social policy; cognitive basis of intelligence. Debates about generational, racial, and gender differences in IQ.
8. Biological Influences
Heritability in intelligence and personality, neurobiological theories of personality, evolutionary influences & comparative personality, mental illness and personality disorders.
9. Personality and culture
Further ideas and debates in personality and culture including national character, social attitudes, evolutionary approaches, cognitive and learning styles, individual differences in health and illness, social anxiety and shyness.
10. Individual differences in cognitive styles
Individual differences in how we think, perceive and remember information. Exploration of different learning style and theories of learning.

PSY304 Description

The module involves learning the techniques required to design systematic approaches to scientific enquiry of the mind using the latest techniques and technologies. This includes identifying testable hypotheses and tractable questions. It also involves appreciating the technical constraints on display technology and the methodological considerations required to present stimuli accurately, precisely. Finally, it emphasises the importance of attaining the ability to communicate scientific methods for the benefit of others.

Aims
The aim of this module is to take a problem-based learning approach to the appreciation of the techniques required to conduct research in contemporary Psychological Science. The goal is to equip students with the ability to make informed judgments about appropriate methods and to select or implement the correct technique based on the requirements of the research question.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses in different methodological approaches to data collection and analysis in Psychological Science.
2. Select or implement an effective and appropriate technical or analytical solution suitable for addressing an empirical question in Psychological Science.
3. Use appropriate presentation format(s) to enable other investigators to replicate or appreciate the techniques used to solve an experimental problem or challenge.

Indicative Content
1. Technology in Psychology
Appreciating the opportunities of using computers to assess human performance to precisely control displays or to enable large volumes of data to be collected.
2. Control of computer displays
Strength and weaknesses of CRT Monitors, Flat panel displays, tablet computers, Virtual Reality etc. Using computers to run experiments on visual processing.
3. Sources of Error and Artifacts in Experiments
Showing how a knowledge and appreciation of technological limits of equipment can eliminate or reduce experimental artifacts.
4. Automation of data collection methods
Creating or modifying software to control the sequence, timing and data collection of experiments on analog or digital visual displays.
5. Visual Cognition and Vision Science
Measuring the limits of human visual performance. Using adjustment, staircase or constant stimuli methods. Understanding thresholds and bias. Explaining different methodological approaches to the assessment of eye-movements in scene perception and natural vision.
6. Data challenges In Psychology
Many areas of psychology create exceptionally large data sets, either through imaging techniques such as brain imagery, or distributed computing techniques such as mobile devices and social media. Each of these present opportunities for Psychological Science, but also challenges.
7. From Items Analysis to Linear Mixed Models
The inclusion of F1 and F1 Clark and Clark, Raijmaakers in the need for items analyses. Leading to the contemporary use of Linear Mixed Models. Using SPSS and R to calculate these.
8. Historical and Conceptual Issues
Using case studies to illustrate how technology has informed the creation of theoretical models of human processing. Understanding how technological evolution has driven developments in novel paradigms in vision science and visual cognition.

PSY307 Description

This is a student led module where students and Module Leader collaborate in the module and assessment content, marking criteria and module feedback. The area of study is psychological research related to 'real life' situations showing how psychology can be practiced in environments such as industry, law, education, health and social work, and delivered as workshops by staff and external speakers. Abertay Attributes will be formally addressed in each session by students identifying and noting the relevant attributes in Pebblepad or similar.

Aims
This module will develop skills aligned to the Abertay Attributes; Intellectual: Relating psychological models, theories and methods to 'real life' applications. Professional: facilitation of employability skills through running events with external organisations and in the formulation of quality enhancement and quality assurance processes in the module. Personal: Reflection on own and others' qualities through experience of team work, sense of achievement through organising successful events. Active citizenship: Poster on psychological research relating to a society issue. Students will learn to communicate clear messages in plain English verbally in meetings, visually in a poster, and in a documentary film.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Situate and evaluate the usefulness and limitations of psychological research in applied contexts.
2. Use teamwork to research, produce and present a conference poster on a research question of own choice.
3. Give and receive peer feedback optimally, understand purpose, design and practice of assessments and feedback and possible limitations of same.
4. Reflect upon their own knowledge and understanding. Appreciate the employability skills afforded by a degree in psychology.
5. Appreciate the professional skills required to host external guests, organise events, run meetings, facilitate discussions and design and deliver publicity.

Indicative Content
1. Psychology and Technology
How has psychology research influenced technology development such as artificial intelligence and security systems?
2. Psychological Therapies in the Real World
Understanding the applications and impact of psychology therapies, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, and speech and language therapy.
3. Psychology in the Public Sector
Understanding the ways in which local and national governments use psychology research.
4. Psychology in the Workplace
Exploring the impact of psychology on human resource management in the workplace, focusing on issues of equality, diversity and inclusion.
5. Environmental Psychology
To what extent are the environments we live and work in influenced by psychology?
6. Sports Psychology in the Real World
What is sports psychology and how is it applied to issues like duty of care?
7. Applied Forensic Psychology
Applying psychology theory to crime to help answer questions like ‘why do offenders offend?’
8. Applied Educational Psychology
How can psychology theories be applied in teaching, such as supporting children with learning difficulties?

PSY309 Description

Aims
This module introduces you to the mental processes involved in physical and creative cultural practices. In lectures and practical classes, you will gain current psychological knowledge on the cognitive, perceptual and neuronal processes involved in dance and movement as well as other artistic/creative practices such as music, acting or painting. The focus is on building an in-depth appreciative yet critical understanding of contemporary empirical research entailing a variety of methodological approaches. In particular, you will learn how to apply your own embodied experience with creative practices in critically appreciating existing research linked with dance performance, dance spectatorship, aesthetic and cultural evolution, as well as arts-based health and wellbeing approaches.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate familiarity with conceptual frameworks within the field.
2. Review and evaluate published work within the field, identifying some of its strengths and weaknesses.
3. Show an understanding of current critical thinking in empirical research and situate contemporary research in the historical context of psychology.
4. Write with clarity to present logical and coherent arguments that are well structured.
5. Work effectively with others by communicating own ideas effectively and creatively, and by giving feedback as well as making use of feedback received.
6. Show independent engagement through self-led study using a range of learning resources.

Indicative Content
1. Why do we dance: Feelings, the innateness of rhythm and functions of dance
Are we born to dance? Is dancing an innate, biologically-driven activity to get in trance? Do animals dance? The module will provide a comprehensive introduction to theories and research findings on the evolution of dance, considering functions of rituals linked to aggression, status, trance, mating and communication. We will discuss studies showing the genetic disposition of dance, personality and individual differences in developmental, cognitive and motor responses to dance, music and rhythm.
2. What you need to dance: Motor action, perception, and memory
What makes our body move? To understand what we need in order to dance, the module will cover topics of motor control and action, visuo-spatial perception, memory and frameworks of expertise. Further, advancements in models of training and strategies to enhance performance will be discussed (i.e., imagery, attention, goal-setting, and other training technique for improving performance).
3. Watching dance: Audiences’ expertise and personal preferences
What do we see and feel when we watch dance? This section builds the core of the module. It covers a large content, relating to the nonverbal information we transmit through dance and how. Research on cognitive, perceptual, emotional and sensorimotor processes of watching dance will be discussed within the concepts of action observation, mirror neurons, embodied cognition, sensorimotor entrainment, kinaesthetic empathy, biological motion, synchronicity as well as experimental aesthetics.
4. The benefits of dance: Self-confidence, body image, rehabilitation, health and wellbeing
The reports on effects of dance on health and wellbeing are controversial. While participation in recreational dance has predominantly positive effects on self-image, vocational dance training and professional dance practice can be hugely detrimental to the individual’s health and wellbeing. The findings from the literature are discussed in terms of body image, motivation, and identity, injury and self-esteem, ideal means of training, as well as dance as a form of rehabilitation.
5. The Psychology of theatre, art, music, sport, gaming
Throughout the module, we will touch on other cultural practices, such as acting, painting, writing, music, and so on. As with dance, individuals’ motivations to engage in these practices, related health and wellbeing benefits will be discussed and students are expected to engage in proposed literature in their field of interest.

Psychology - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Psychology course.

Module 1: PSY206 Essential Research Methods and Analysis for Psychology

Module 2: choose PSY207 Philosophy of science, mind and the 'self' OR SOC204 Crime, Media and the State

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of BSc Psychology course.

Module 1: PSY302 Human Development across the Lifespan

Module 2: PSY303 Advanced Research, Design and Analysis

Module 3: choose PSY310 Cultural evolution of behaviour OR PSY308 Biological Influences on Behaviour in Humans and non-Humans

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

PSY206 Description

To build on research methods knowledge and prepare student for third year Core Research Methods

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to further develop the knowledge and skills required to design, conduct, analyse and report quantitative and qualitative psychological research in APA format

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Report, design and conduct ethically acceptable psychological research using techniques taught on the module.
2. Report, evaluate psychological research and present this in APA format.
3. Use SPSS to analyse empirical data utilising a variety of statistical techniques.
4. Identify and locate, using a variety of resources, suitable reference material for practical work.
5. Demonstrate, via assessment a good understanding of the key principles of psychological research design and data interpretation

Indicative Content
1. Methods of Research
Main quantitative and qualitative research methods available to psychologists; Use in applied settings; advantages and disadvantages
2. The Experimental Method
Variables and levels; hypotheses; design - basic and advanced; control techniques; validity and reliability in experimentation; ethics in experimentation
3. Data Analysis - Descriptive Statistics
Data types; measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; normal distribution; graphing data; confidence intervals.
4. Data Analysis - Inferential Statistics
Test selection; parametric and nonparametric 2-sample test of difference; Within and Between one-way ANOVA and Non-parametric ANOVA, effect size; power; correlation; Tests of both internal and external reliability; inter rater reliability
5. Qualitative Methods
Types of qualitative research techniques; questionnaire design, interviewing - types, advantages, disadvantages; analysing interview material.
6. Quantitative Methods
Experimental method, two variable tests of difference (parametric and non-parametric), tests of relationships (parametric and non-parametric); multilevel testing (parametric and non-parametric), follow up testing (parametric and non-parametric). Reliability analysis using Cronbach's alpha, quantitative content analysis, item analysis
7. Ethics
Creating and conducting ethical research based on BPS Ethical Guidelines
8. Reporting Research
Sections and content of an APA formatted psychology lab report; APA referencing
9. Information Searching
Structured and unstructured search; Search using the Internet and locating electronic journals using the university library system and appropriate data bases
10. I.T.Skills
Designing a lab report template using Word for Windows; using SPSS for data analysis.

PSY207 Description

The module draws on various different perspectives in psychology, biology and behavioural sciences in order to explore various conceptual and historical issues relating to how psychological science is/has been conducted, disseminated and applied in the wider world, and how individuals have attempted to understand our minds, our "self" and our place in the world. Advanced conceptual issues in psychology are discussed, and students are introduced to skills useful for academic and non-academic research more generally.

Aims
The module will provide students with an understanding of key critical debates on what it means to be human and some of the issues inherent in the conduct, dissemination and application of research on human behaviour. Students will be able to use this knowledge to explore their discipline at a societal and conceptual level, which, in turn, will facilitate useful professional and research-related skills.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of debates on the nature of mind, behaviour and self, and be able to place research in Psychology in its historical context.
2. Be able to appreciate and communicate the multi-disciplinary nature of research on human behaviour, drawing on different "schools-of-thought" where appropriate.
3. Show competence when comparing and contrasting papers/texts and perspectives within psychological science.
4. Be able to reflect on the conduct, dissemination and application of research in psychological science in ways that enhance students' own research-related skills and ability to problem-solve.

Indicative Content
1. Philosophy of science: How we formulate and answer questions
How is science funded, conducted and disseminated? What is a theory and a good explanation?
2. Conceptual issues and current directions in Psychology
Metaphors of mind. Perspectives on, and applications of, psychology. Is the mind a blank slate? Is the DSM valid? How do you know what is ‘true’? Ethics, politics and moral psychology
3. Know thyself: Perspectives on self
Relationships between 'self' and memory. Can psychological experiments answer philosophical questions about flourishing and the meaning of life?
4. History of Psychology
A broad overview of common themes and debates running through the history of our field. Linking past ideas to current thinking. The 'shaping' of psychology by social forces and the 'Psychologization of society'.

SOC204 Description

This module will look at media discourses of criminal activity and the state.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to develop an understanding of relationships between states and criminal activity, and the complex media centred discourses emerging from these. In so doing it will provide students with an interpretive framework for analysing historical and contemporary discourses of state criminal activity.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and evaluate key theories and examples associated with state criminal activity.
2. Identify and evaluate key theories and examples associated with the state and political violence.
3. Identify and evaluate key theories and examples associated with role of the media and state criminal activity.

Indicative Content
1. Crimes of the Powerful
The state as criminal actor
2. Media, Crime and Power
3. Investigative Journalism, Corruption and the Political Process
4. State Corporate Corruption
5. The Nation State and Violence
6. Terrorism and Counter Terrorism in the Global War on Terror
7. Crimes Against Humanity
8. Transnational Organized Crime
9. The Geopolitical War on Drugs
10. Discourses from Below – Urban Legends, Conspiracy theories and other Stigmatized Knowledge

PSY302 Description

This is a BPS core psychology module that examines theories, methods and empirical data relevant to psychological development throughout the lifespan.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge and understanding of theories and empirical data in the core areas of developmental psychology and changes throughout the lifespan.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand and critically evaluate theories of psychological development in light of relevant empirical research.
2. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of developmental change in cognition, emotion, socialisation and physical development, including major developmental milestones in children and adolescents.
3. Show a critical awareness of current thinking on the interaction between biological bases and environmental influences in development.
4. Demonstrate conceptual knowledge of research methods in the domain of development and knowledge of when to apply these.

Indicative Content
1. Biological basis of development; theories and milestones
Pre-and postnatal brain development, brain maturation, biological basis of ageing.
2. How to study development?
Designs and approaches.
3. Infancy
Methods for studying infant development, physical development in infancy, cognitive development in infancy: Memory and pre- cursors to language, social and emotional development in infancy.
4. Early Childhood
Methods for studying early childhood, physical and cognitive development in early childhood, language development in early childhood, social and emotional development in early childhood, moral development in early childhood.
5. Middle Childhood
Physical and cognitive development in middle childhood, social development and peer relations in middle childhood. Emotional and Moral Development in Middle Childhood
6. Adolescence
Physical and cognitive development in adolescence, social and emotional development in adolescence.
7. Adulthood
Biological, cognitive and social changes in middle adulthood. Theories and data on midlife crisis.
8. Ageing
Biological, cognitive and social changes in late adulthood; models of cognitive decline; emotional and personality changes, dementia, death, longevity.

PSY303 Description

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to design and conduct independent research projects at honours level using the appropriate research methodology.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of the research process (both qualitative and quantitative) and designated issues in experimental design.
2. Via active participation in class: run, analyse and interpret results from a class experiment using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and use this information to write up an assessed report.
3. Apply knowledge and understanding of the research process (qualitative/quantitative) and issues in experimental design to prepare a research proposal for ethical review (under supervision).
4. Via active participation in class: run, analyse and interpret results using qualitative methodology and use this information to write up an assessed report.

Indicative Content
1. Analysis of Variance
As part of the ANOVA section we will briefly revise variance and one-way ANOVA. We will then move on to examine factorial ANOVA designs; within, between and mixed designs; main effects and interactions; exploring interactions and multiple comparisons (a priori and post-hoc).
2. ANOVA practical
Throughout the ANOVA labs and lectures, students will participate in the design, implementation and data gathering of a study suitable for analysis with ANOVA and will write this up as an assessed piece of coursework.
3. Experimental Design
Here we will examine methodological issues in design, identifying limitations of designs, defining a research question, hypothesis testing and operationalising variables. We will also look at Type I and II errors; effect sizes and statistical power.
4. Qualitative methods of data collection and analysis
We will cover the theoretical underpinning of qualitative methods. This will include the design of research questions; how to code data from visual and textual formats, the application of techniques such as content and thematic analysis. We will use textual data (such as interview schedules) to carry out a qualitative analysis. This work will contribute towards the assessed qualitative report,
5. Correlation and Multiple Regression
Here we will cover simple linear regression models and multiple predictors of a criterion variable (multiple linear regression). Here we explain statistical tests for multiple regression models.
6. Laboratory Skills
Students are given extensive training in the advanced use of SPSS for analyses. Regular laboratory attendance is recommended in order to develop strong research skills. This will allow the individual to become a confident researcher.
7. Project proposal for supervisor feedback and subsequent ethics submission
Students are required to write an ethics proposal for their fourth year project with support and guidance from their allocated supervisor. Research design and analysis skills are employed to design a suitable experiment/study. Identifying, and addressing, possible ethical issues are central to this process. Supervisors will give feedback to a draft of the proposal.
8. Research Skills: Writing and work management
Communicating effectively in oral and written form, using research literature effectively. Reporting and interpreting. Writing using American Psychological Association editorial style. Developing a meeting agenda, goal setting and evaluating progress, communicating effectively in supervision meetings, identifying responsibilities. Sustaining research work in laboratory classes.

PSY310 Description

This module will develop student’s understanding of the psychological processes that underlie cultural evolution and critically assess the research methods used. The module will explore different elements of core psychology sub-disciplines including evolutionary, cognitive, comparative, developmental and social. The module provides an in-depth understanding of how humans have evolved specific psychological mechanisms that facilitate cultural evolution and how they compare with other species. There will be a number of innovative learning contexts including demonstrations and field trips.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an in-depth and critical understanding of issues related to the cultural evolution of behaviour, including key theoretical approaches, research methods and research findings. This will be achieved through demonstrations, lectorials and field trips.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical perspective of cultural evolution.
2. Demonstrate detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of cultural evolution including their evolution and development.
3. Demonstrate detailed knowledge of how human cultural evolution of behaviour may differ from other species.
4. Demonstrate a deep understanding of cultural evolution research and research methods.
5. Engage in effective, knowledgeable communication regarding cultural evolution research and potential future research directions.

Indicative Content
1. Conceptual Issues
Introduction to the cultural evolution of behaviour. What is the philosophy of cultural evolution? How does it relate to the study of psychology? What are the criticisms of such an approach?
2. Approaches to the study of Cultural Evolution
Exploring how psychologists investigate cultural evolution. How can we investigate evolutionary change in culture? An overview of research methods including observation, labs, comparative and developmental research.
3. Comparative perspectives of Cultural Evolution
Focusing on the identification of social traditions and evidence for culture across species. Investigating the psychological mechanisms and strategies that effect cultural evolution and how these may differ across species. Discussing the psychological limitations of non-human culture.
4. Ontogeny of Cultural Evolution
Explore how children come to be cultural beings and acquire the cognitive skills necessary to acquire cultural behaviours.
5. Language evolution and language change
Study the main experimental paradigms that can help us understand the constraints that shape emergence of linguistic structure during vertical and horizontal transmission, and what this means for theoretical approaches to language evolution.

PSY308 Description

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge of how biological processes can influence behaviour and cognitive performance in a range of species including humans, non-human primates and other animals. An integral part of this is enabling students to gain direct experience of measuring behaviour and biological processes in humans and animals. This will allow them to investigate and evaluate current research questions in laterality and comparative psychology as well as physiological indicators of cognitive processing.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Apply knowledge of biological variations between species and individuals to explain or predict differences in observed behaviour.
2. Critically evaluate published literature on humans and non-humans to identify future research directions.
3. Evaluate methods used to measure biological differences and behaviour in humans and non-humans, recognising limitations and designing solutions.
4. Develop practical skills in measurement of biological and behavioural processes in humans and non-humans.
5. Demonstrate a critical awareness of how laterality and other brain asymmetries might influence behaviour.

Indicative Content
1. Why do primates have big brains?
Introducing differences in brain size and organisation in humans and non-humans with particular focus on Primates. We will look at theories put forward to explain the large brains of monkeys, apes and humans including ecological, developmental and social drives for big brains.
2. What can a big brain do for you?
Brains are exceptionally expensive to maintain in metabolic terms so why 'pay' for such a greedy organ? We will look at how differences in cortical processing power influence cognitive ability in the physical and social domains.
3. Historical and Conceptual Issues in Laterality
Introduction to asymmetry in brain and behaviour, functional localisation and comparative asymmetry.
4. Comparative Lateralisation
Evolutionary and comparative evidence. What can animal laterality studies tell us about behaviour? We will also discuss methods of measuring laterality in animals.
5. Brain Structural Lateralisation
Cerebral asymmetries, asymmetries of structure, asymmetries of function, and asymmetries of activation.
6. Handedness and Behaviour
Here we will discuss the evolution and history of handedness, genetic models, pathology and environmental influences. We will also discuss the measurement of handedness, the development of handedness and the relationship between handedness and behaviour.
7. Hormonal influences on behaviour
Effects of hormones on behaviour. For example, will cover the effects that testosterone, progesterone and estrogen may have on psychological functions.
8. Personality, lateralisation and behaviour
Approach and avoidance behaviour, reinforcement sensitivity theory, asymmetries as predictors of behaviour.

Sport - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Sport and Exercise course.

Module 1: SPS201 Psychology for Sport and Exercise

Module 2: SPS203 Key Concepts in Sport and Exercise Physiology

Module 3: SPS207 Placement and skill development when working with children in a physical activity context

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Sport and Exercise and related Sport courses.

Choose 3 of the following:

SPS301 Coaching and Learning

SPS302 Public Health and Physical Activity

SPS305 Fundamentals of Strength Conditioning

SPS310 Physiological Adaptations for Performance

SPS313 Social Issues in Sport and Exercise

SPS314 Health Related Fitness Assessment and Programming

SPS201 Description

The overall purpose of this module is to develop students’ understanding of the core concepts of sport and exercise psychology and how these apply to real world environments. This will be achieved by explicitly addressing students’ knowledge of affect, behaviour and cognition within relevant contexts. They will examine intrapersonal and interpersonal factors and explore how these factors both shape and are shaped by involvement in sport and exercise.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the core concepts of sport and exercise psychology.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of core psychological processes related to sport and exercise.
2. Explain psychological concepts that underpin performance at the individual level.
3. Explain psychological concepts that underpin team processes.
4. Review, interpret and present data collected from appropriate psychological tests.

Indicative Content
1. Identifying psychological issues in sport and exercise
Students will look at how identify and discuss variety of psychological issues in sport. They will need to consider what these are and how they can be grouped (e.g., positive/negative experiences, mental skills etc.)
2. Fundamentals of sport and exercise psychology
Students will explore the core concepts of sport and exercise psychology. Examining the interaction of affect, behaviour and cognition and identifying how they manifest in sport and exercise contexts.
3. Individual factors
Students will learn about key individual factors that influence how individuals act and react. This will include topics such as personality, motivation, anxiety and attention.
4. Group processes
Students will learn about key group factors that influence how individuals act and react. This will include topics such as communication, social climate and group dynamics.
5. An introduction to psychological skills
Students will be introduced to core psychological skills training and learn how they are applied and their limitations.

SPS203 Description

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the core concepts of sport and exercise physiology and the application to performance, exercise and health.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of core bioenergetic processes related to sport, exercise and health.
2. . Explain the role of the endocrine system in exercise and performance.
3. Explain the cardiovascular and respiratory response during exercise.
4. 4. Develop an understanding of fatigue and lactate metabolism in relation to exercise performance.
5. Develop key skills in research through data collection, analysis and interpretation.

Indicative Content
1. Fundamentals of bioenergetics
Students will explore the core concepts of energy production during exercise, examining the interaction of the different energy systems during exercise and how these change with inactivity.
2. Regulation of energy systems
Students will learn about hormonal and neural factors that influence the availability and regulation of fuel metabolism at rest and during exercise in health and disease.
3. Cardiovascular and respiratory system in sport and exercise
Students will learn about the determinants of exercising muscle oxygenation and its regulation by the cardiovascular and respiratory system, the regulation of arterial blood pressure during exercise and the interaction between oxygenation and arterial blood pressure.
4. Fatigue
Students will develop an understanding of both neuromuscular and skeletal muscle fatigue and the potential mechanisms resulting in the development of fatigue.
5. Physiological Testing
Students will explore a number of physiological tests that are used routinely for health assessment, developing an understanding of the tests and their limitations. Students will also learn how to carry out different physiological tests and analyse and interpret the results.

SPS207 Description

This module will give students the opportunity to lead, develop and/or support the delivery of physical activity sessions to school pupils in Dundee. Students will also have an opportunity to engage with a range of employers from the Sport and Fitness industry to gain insight into the requirements of particular roles. These experiences should enable the student to develop a career plan for future employment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : an opportunity to apply and/or understand the application of theory in real world practice settings and to reflect on and articulate the development of their leadership, communication, organisation and management skills. The module will provide the student with opportunities to make a more informed choice about their future degree pathway, to determine career goals and to plan their progress toward achieving these goals

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Reflect on their leadership, communication, organisation and management skills; identify areas for development, and opportunities by which to do this.
2. Deliver and/or support activity sessions for children in the community and articulate how this activity is contributing to their future career aspirations.
3. Articulate their skills, strengths, experiences and achievements to a prospective employer.
4. Understand the demands associated with different professions within the sport and fitness industry.
5. Reflect on these demands in evaluating personal learning and development in the context of career planning.

Indicative Content
1. Planning and delivering activity sessions
Session planning; managing time/resources/people; working within a team; Active Schools/Positive Coaching Scotland training; managing challenging behaviour; developing diversity competence; Growth Mindset; contemporary issues in the sport and fitness industry.
2. Personal Development Planning (PDP)
Completing SWOT analyses; personal objective/goal setting; action planning; electronic PDPs.
3. Reflective practice
Application of models of reflective practice; guided reflection to highlight learning; making theory− practice links; career planning.
4. Articulating skill development
Using electronic platforms and oral media to promote knowledge and skills to external audiences in the context of employability; careers/external speaker workshops.

SPS301 Description

The overall purpose of this module is to develop students’ understanding of the concepts of coaching and learning and to apply these to physical activity environments. This will be achieved by explicitly addressing students’ knowledge of education and pedagogy and their ability to apply that knowledge in a suitable context. Students will move beyond a reductionist view of coaching simply as a systematic procedure and have students consider and discuss the influence of the social aspects of coaching such as leadership, relationships, and social environments.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the concept of coaching and learning through a model−based approach while giving them the basis for the conceptual study of sports coaching.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically explain how the concept of pedagogy and education apply to physical activity environments.
2. Analyse how different theoretical models describe the constituent parts of the coaching process and the coach’s role within this process.
3. Appraise the practical application of skill acquisition to coaching within physical activity environments.
4. Explain different participant groups, stages of development and environments and evaluate their impact on the coaching process.

Indicative Content
1. Coaching and learning
Students will consider the definition and purpose of coaching and learning. They will be asked to consider what is the purpose and definition of coaching, what it has to do with pedagogy and education.
2. The role of the coach
Students will be asked to consider the role of the coach, what their purpose is, and what they are trying to achieve. They will consider the level of participation, demands placed on coaches by external bodies, and coaches own philosophies towards the instruction of athletes.
3. The coaching process
Students will identify the key characteristics of coaching. They will consider a variety of leadership and relationship models and discuss how these fit into the idea of coaching as a systematic process.
4. Skill development
Students will examine the principles that underpin the creation on an efficient learning environment. They will consider modern theories of skill acquisition and how they relate to effective pedagogical.
5. Participant Groups
Students will consider different categorisations of participants and how this impacts on the planning and delivery of the coaching process.

SPS302 Description

This module examines the health benefits of physical activity and its potential function in disease prevention, treatment and its role in promoting and maintaining public health.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an appreciation and understanding of the role of physical activity in improving public health and preventing and controlling lifestyle diseases.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically examine the relationship between physical activity and public health.
2. Provide an overview of the current UK health status in relation to diseases and conditions associated with physical inactivity.
3. Evaluate the current research literature pertaining to the use of physical activity as a treatment for hypokinetic diseases and the potential impact on public health.

Indicative Content
1. Relationship between physical activity and health.
Physical Activity and Disease Mortality Morbidity. Historical perspective to present day.
2. Epidemiology of physical activity
Concepts and Methods in Physical Activity Epidemiology Epidemiological Measures
3. Variations in health status
Influence of age, gender, social status, education
4. Determinants of participation in physical activity
Challenges of engaging people in physical activity
5. Physical activity recommendations
Physical activity recommendations
6. Place and emphasis of physical activity in health policy
Identified role of physical activity in policies to promote health. Developing role, adoption and promotion of physical activity as a tool to promote health of the nation
7. Role of physical activity in promoting physical and mental
Physical and mental health benefits of regular participation in physical activity

SPS305 Description

This module is intended to introduce students to methods of training employed within a strength and conditioning context. You will learn some of the major underpinning physiological and biomechanical components of human performance, and scientifically justified periodized methods for training to achieve specific goals. You will also gain an understanding of the acute and chronic effects of particular forms of training and the relationship between particular exercises and the sporting context. This will be coupled with a development of weightlifting techniques and coaching.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the theoretical and practical knowledge of the fundamentals of strength and conditioning.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the scientific underpinnings of human force production.
2. Demonstrate theoretical knowledge in various forms of training methods.
3. Identify the SC requirements of various sports and design periodized short term programmes dealing with specific elements of these.
4. Demonstrate practical competency and technical knowledge of weightlifting techniques.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to SC/ Functional Screening
Introduction to key terminology/concepts of SC and a fundamental understanding of basic functional athlete screening.
2. Introduction to Human Movement
An introduction to human anatomy and the mechanics of human force production (e.g., planes of movement, lever systems).
3. Introduction to Compound lifting
Introduction to the major compound exercises (e.g., Back/Front Squat, Dead−Lift, Bent−Over Row, Bench Press and an introduction to Weightlifting derivatives) with Key technical elements and coaching points associated with each lift.
4. Neuromuscular Physiology
Neuromuscular physiology and fibre types.
5. Plyometric Training
An introduction to the fundamental principles underpinning Plyometric Training (Stretch−Shortening −Cycle) and an understanding of the key technical coaching points.
8. Sports Nutrition
Principles of periodised sports nutrition for S&C training programmes.

SPS310 Description

The overall purpose of this module is to develop students’ understanding of the core physiological concepts that underpin performance. This will be achieved by explicitly addressing students’ knowledge of biochemical, cardiovascular and neuromuscular bases for performance and training the body for endurance, team and strength. Throughout this module, students will utilise both physiological and biomechanical equipment to allow them to explore and collect physiological data in relation to enhancing sports performance outcomes.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the physiology underpinning sports performance and its adaptation to training and ergogenic aids.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically evaluate the role of different physiological systems in performance
2. Analyse the physiological outcomes of training
3. Explain performance enhancement and evaluate different physiological strategies to improve performance
4. Synthesise performance testing with physiological concepts and training outcomes

Indicative Content
1. Biochemistry of performance
Students will explore the core concepts of energy production during sport and exercise, the metabolic processes and the rate limiting steps for performance and the metabolic adaptations to training.
2. Cardiovascular system and performance
Students will learn about cardiac output and blood flow regulation and cardiovascular adaptation to training.
3. Neuromuscular system and performance
Students will learn about the contractile mechanism, motor unit activation, neuromuscular fatigue and strength, power and speed performance.
4. Doping and performance
Students will develop an understanding of the role of doping in elite sport and the physiological adaptations to doping.
5. Training for performance
Students will explore different training modalities to improve endurance and anaerobic power and strength and how to plan energy specific programmes.

SPS313 Description

This module explores contemporary issues in sport and exercise, particularly those they are likely to encounter and have to navigate in their future employment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : awareness and understanding of contemporary issues in sport and society.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to :
1. Identify and provide examples of contemporary issues in sport and society.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of historical, cultural and comparative sensitivities within contemporary issues in sport and society.
3. Critically examine sport culture through application of social theory and empirical research.
4. Produce ideas for progressive development of sport and exercise based on critical analysis of contemporary social issues.

Indicative Content
1. Social theory
Students will learn key aspects of social theory that can be/ have been used to explain phenomena in sport and exercise.
2. Inequality and discrimination
Students will explore the main sources of inequality and discrimination in sport and exercise (e.g., gender, social class, ethnicity, LGBTI)
3. Sport and politics
Students will explore how various political systems/ ideologies and governing bodies use sport/athletes as a vehicle for social control.
4. Ethics and sport
Students will learn about moral and ethical issues in sport and exercise (e.g., child protection). Sport and exercise cultures provide a unique environment for moral and ethical issues.

SPS314 Description

The overall purpose of this module is to develop students understanding of physiological adaptations to exercise from a health related viewpoint. This will be achieved by detailing salient acute and chronic adaptations from the whole− body level down to the cellular level. Students will examine acute and chronic outcomes of training to improve health and how to assess these outcomes using physiological tests. This module provides the opportunity to develop an understanding of how to use the results of testing data to schedule exercise programmes.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: an understanding of exercise adaptations that promote good health.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the theoretical and scientific basis of health related fitness testing and training.
2. Explain and critique acute and chronic responses to exercise.
3. Critically appraise and be proficient in a range of assessments of health related fitness.

Indicative Content
1. Acute and chronic adaptation to training
Students will learn how the different physiological systems in the body adapt, both in the short term and longer term, to training.
2. Cellular physiology
Cellular physiology− students will learn some of the cellular adaptations that occur in the body in response to training.
3. Training for heath
Training for health− students will learn how to elucidate such adaptations through exercise training.
4. Testing for change
Students will learn a range of suitable tests to measure change in the body from a health related viewpoint.

Sport - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Sport and Exercise course.

Module 1: SPS202 Key Concepts in Biomechanics for Sport and Exercise

Module 2: SPS204 Social Science of Physical Activity and Health

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of BSc Sport and Exercise and related Sport courses.

Module 1: SPS312 Research Methods

For modules 2 & 3, choose two of the following or one of the following and one elective module:

SPS306 Applied Sport Psychology

SPS307 Managing Sport Policy and Development

SPS308 Applied Biomechanics for Performance

SPS309 Physical Activity and Health Promotion

SPS311 Physiology of Obesity and Non-communicable Diseases

SPS202 Description

This module introduces the student to the study of biomechanical concepts applied within a sport health and performance perspective. It will offer the student the opportunity to analyse movement using various biomechanical laboratory techniques including those relating to movement analysis, reaction forces and the application of Newton's Laws.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the core concepts of biomechanical concepts and basic practical laboratory skills within biomechanics.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe the how the biomechanics of movement influence sport and exercise performance.
2. Discuss and apply laboratory means of measuring the biomechanics of movement.
3. Apply formulae relating to the biomechanics.
4. Be able to discuss biomechanical concepts in a sport and exercise context.
5. Evaluate a laboratory experiment, which requires application of knowledge and analysis skills pertinent to biomechanics.

Indicative Content
1. Biomechanical concepts in sport and exercise
Further develop understanding of how motion, forces, movement of mass, and acceleration can be applied in a sport, health and exercise context.
2. Specialist equipment use (injury)
Learn about the use of specialist equipment, such as force platforms, 2D motion analysis, contact mats, and electromyography to assess injury risk.
3. Specialist equipment use (performance)
Learn about the use of specialist equipment, such as force platforms, 2D motion analysis, contact mats, and electromyography to improve performance.

SPS204 Description

This module introduces the student to social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of key social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and describe disciplines within the study of physical activity and health that are associated with the social sciences.
2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of key issues in physical activity and health.
3. Identify key structures and governing bodies/policies associated with health and physical activity.
4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of methodologies associated with physical activity and health and what they help us to learn/explain.

Indicative Content
1. Interdisciplinary nature of social sciences
Students will explore the ways in which various disciplines within social science help us to understand and explain issues relating to physical activity and health (e.g., sociology of sport, sociology of health and illness, epidemiology, sport development, sport history)
2. Critically engage with the notion of ‘healthy’ lifestyles
Students will question the construction of ‘healthy’ living
3. Research topics within the social sciences
Students will make connections between the approaches/findings of physical activity and health research and how these inform debates around agency− structure
4. Political Ideology and Social Inequalities
Students will question the ways in which health and physical activity participation are framed by political ideologies and consider how and why this influences social inequalities
5. Qualitative methodologies
Students will be introduced to qualitative research and how it has developed our understanding of physical activity and health.

SPS306 Description

This module builds upon the theoretical and knowledge of sports psychology and introduces aspects of applied sports psychology in the sport and performance context.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to discuss the role of psychological skills in sport and critically analyse the development of psychological skills training programmes to improve sport performance.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe and critically appraise sports psychological literature related to performance enhancement.
2. Discuss the application of psychological principles in the sports context
3. Identify and integrate psychological interventions strategies to particular sport performance-related scenarios.

Indicative Content
1. Sports psychology context and practice
Role/s of the sports psychologists; contexts and different perspectives on the work of a sports psychologist.
2. Planning and developing interventions
The needs analysis process; empowerment; ownership and motivation; assessment of efficacy.
3. Psychological skills training
Theory and research of goal setting, relaxation, energisation, imagery, positive self talk, pre-performance and performance routines. Performance enhancement contexts; injury prevention and rehabilitation contexts.

SPS307 Description

This module provides students with a critical overview of sports policy and development in the UK and to provide the student with the knowledge and expertise to evaluate sports development planning and development.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of sports policy, and the rationales for policy initiatives in the UK and to provide a methodological framework for analysis and evaluation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the policy making process and the political ideologies which shape sports poliy
2. Provide an overview of the development of sport in the UK, outlining the key rationales, values and benefits underpinning sport and physical activity.
3. Critically discuss the contribution of relevant sport agencies and government departments to the sports policy process.
4. Critically analyse and reflect upon the sports planning and development process.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to managing sport development
Outline of the courses content and overall rationale.
2. Sport, exercise and physical body culture.
Sociological considerations. Making sense of sport in a sport development context.
3. UK Sport.
Emergence of sports development; Historical perspectives; Overview of key rationales and values underpinning sport and physical activity. Development of sport or development through sport.
4. Sport and social policy issues.
Health and well−being; Social welfare; Sports equality; Young people and education; Urban regeneration; Elite sport.
5. Ideologies underpinning sport.
Political Ideologies and the emergence of the New Right and New Labour. Rationales for sport policy initiatives. Policy making process. Models of policy development, planning and implementation.
6. Structures and governance of sport (in the UK context)
7. Strategic management and organisational theory.
8. Marketing and managing sports development.
9. Monitoring and evaluation.

SPS308 Description

This module is designed to build and advance the principles of biomechanics and introduce the concept of performance analysis within a sporting context. Utilising biomechanics to create evidence based intervention strategies to optimise performance.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the knowledge and ability to apply biomechanical principles to the analysis of performance for the production of evidence based interventions.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the use and application of notational analysis within a performance setting
2. Analyse and apply biomechanical principles to the analysis of sporting performance
3. Critically evaluate existing biomechanical models in relation to sporting performance
4. Use and understand biomechanical and performance analysis software
5. Develop intermediate biomechanical laboratory skills

Indicative Content
1. Performance Analysis
Students will identify what performance analysis is, observe performance analysis against existing models, apply and assess the efficacy of the different types of performance analysis.
2. Notational Analysis
Students will consider concepts of notational analysis and be introduced to methods of notational analysis for team and individual performance. They will be asked to apply notational analysis methods to a performance setting.
3. Biomechanical concepts associated with performance
Students will critically evaluate biomechanical concepts in relation to their application within a sporting/performance concept. Biomechanical factors that contribute to performance or can be used to optimise performance will be discussed.
4. Development of intermediate laboratory skills
Students will develop intermediate laboratory skills in collection of biomechanical data including, 3D assessment of movement, kinetics using force platforms (ground reaction forces and stability).
5. Data processing and analysis
Students will be taught how to effectively process and analyse biomechanical data generated using biomechanical laboratory equipment.

SPS309 Description

This module introduces the student to health issues high on the policy agenda and the ways in which participation in physical activity can be and is promoted as a way of addressing these issues.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the students with an understanding of the complexities of health promotion and the potential for participation in physical activity to both alleviate and exacerbate contemporary health issues.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the concept of health and health promotion.
2. Critically discuss the importance of promoting physical activity in contemporary society.
3. Explain how health promotion interventions may often exacerbate existing health inequalities.
4. Appraise a physical activity intervention in relation to its potential impact on health inequalities.

Indicative Content
1. Defining Health
Students will understand the different ways in which health can and will be defined
2. Complexity of health promotion in contemporary Society
Students will explore the ways in which health promotion has the potential to both reduce and exacerbate existing social inequalities
3. Physical activity, its determinants and importance for health promotion
Students will develop a critical understanding of what factors influence physical activity and its fundamental role in health promotion
4. Critical Engagement with the Obesity ‘Epidemic’
Students will develop a critical understanding of why obesity is prioritised on the health policy agenda
5. Health promotion, physical activity and the environment
Students will explore the environmental factors that influence the promotion of health and physical activity participation

SPS311 Description

This module will cover the aetiology, physiology and pathophysiology of obesity and the principal non-communicable diseases.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge of obesity and a selection of non-communicable diseases that affect the human body and how these conditions impact upon lifestyle and lifespan.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically discuss the major pathophysiological processes and underlying mechanisms of obesity and a range of non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer.
2. Describe the symptoms, prevalence, morbidity, mortality, and risk factors associated with the examined conditions.
3. Identify and evaluate the importance of physical activity in the prevention and management of the human conditions covered.
4. Critically analyse and evaluate scientific research publications in the area.

Indicative Content
1. Pathophysiology of Obesity
Critical overview of the pathophysiology of obesity and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.
2. Pathophysiology of Type II Diabetes
Critical overview of the pathophysiology of Type II Diabetes and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.
3. Pathophysiology of Cardiovascular
Critical overview of the pathophysiology of Cardiovascular disease and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.
4. Pathophysiology of Cancer
Critical overview of the pathophysiology of cancer and its exacerbation by physical inactivity.

Sport and Management - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Sport and Management course.

Module 1: SPS201 Psychology for Sport and Exercise

Module 2: BMT206 Introduction to Human Resource Management

Module 3: SPS207 Placement and skill development when working with children in a physical activity context

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Sport and Management course.

Module 1: BMT306 Business in Society

For modules 2 & 3, choose two from:

BMT301 Operations and Supply Chain Management

SPS301 Coaching and Learning

SPS313 Social Issues in Sport and Exercise

SPS201 Description

The overall purpose of this module is to develop students’ understanding of the core concepts of sport and exercise psychology and how these apply to real world environments. This will be achieved by explicitly addressing students’ knowledge of affect, behaviour and cognition within relevant contexts. They will examine intrapersonal and interpersonal factors and explore how these factors both shape and are shaped by involvement in sport and exercise.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the core concepts of sport and exercise psychology.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of core psychological processes related to sport and exercise.
2. Explain psychological concepts that underpin performance at the individual level.
3. Explain psychological concepts that underpin team processes.
4. Review, interpret and present data collected from appropriate psychological tests.

Indicative Content
1. Identifying psychological issues in sport and exercise
Students will look at how identify and discuss variety of psychological issues in sport. They will need to consider what these are and how they can be grouped (e.g., positive/negative experiences, mental skills etc.)
2. Fundamentals of sport and exercise psychology
Students will explore the core concepts of sport and exercise psychology. Examining the interaction of affect, behaviour and cognition and identifying how they manifest in sport and exercise contexts.
3. Individual factors
Students will learn about key individual factors that influence how individuals act and react. This will include topics such as personality, motivation, anxiety and attention.
4. Group processes
Students will learn about key group factors that influence how individuals act and react. This will include topics such as communication, social climate and group dynamics.
5. An introduction to psychological skills
Students will be introduced to core psychological skills training and learn how they are applied and their limitations.

BMT206 Description

This module introduces students to the human resource management function within organisations

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of human resource management theory and practice.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the roles of line managers and human resource specialists in the effective management of people
2. Explore and analyse different approaches and techniques available to human resource management practitioners
3. Demonstrate how human resource management can add value to organisations

Indicative Content
1. Personnel management to human resource management- a historical perspective
The origins of personnel management, emergence of HRM, hard and soft hrm
2. The role of line managers and hrm practioners
The range and scope of HR activities, distinction between operational and strategic HR activities, the role of the line manager in HR activities,
3. Employee resourcing
Human resource planning; pre recruitment activities, recruitment, selection, employer branding
4. Employee development
Talent planning; training and development methods, designing learning and development, induction
5. Employee relations
Control, power and authority in the employment relationship, HRM and employee relations, employee voice, employee participation
6. Employee reward
Forms of reward, management of reward, reward systems, base pay. incremental pay schemes, contingency pay
7. Performance management
measuring performance, performance appraisal, dealing with poor performance.

SPS207 Description

This module will give students the opportunity to lead, develop and/or support the delivery of physical activity sessions to school pupils in Dundee. Students will also have an opportunity to engage with a range of employers from the Sport and Fitness industry to gain insight into the requirements of particular roles. These experiences should enable the student to develop a career plan for future employment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : an opportunity to apply and/or understand the application of theory in real world practice settings and to reflect on and articulate the development of their leadership, communication, organisation and management skills. The module will provide the student with opportunities to make a more informed choice about their future degree pathway, to determine career goals and to plan their progress toward achieving these goals

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Reflect on their leadership, communication, organisation and management skills; identify areas for development, and opportunities by which to do this.
2. Deliver and/or support activity sessions for children in the community and articulate how this activity is contributing to their future career aspirations.
3. Articulate their skills, strengths, experiences and achievements to a prospective employer.
4. Understand the demands associated with different professions within the sport and fitness industry.
5. Reflect on these demands in evaluating personal learning and development in the context of career planning.

Indicative Content
1. Planning and delivering activity sessions
Session planning; managing time/resources/people; working within a team; Active Schools/Positive Coaching Scotland training; managing challenging behaviour; developing diversity competence; Growth Mindset; contemporary issues in the sport and fitness industry.
2. Personal Development Planning (PDP)
Completing SWOT analyses; personal objective/goal setting; action planning; electronic PDPs.
3. Reflective practice
Application of models of reflective practice; guided reflection to highlight learning; making theory− practice links; career planning.
4. Articulating skill development
Using electronic platforms and oral media to promote knowledge and skills to external audiences in the context of employability; careers/external speaker workshops.

BMT306 Description

The module `Business in Society¿ aims to provide the student with an appreciation of the challenges facing contemporary business organisations in an operating context in which they are expected not only to demonstrate an economic contribution and shareholder value, but increasingly, are expected to do so in a manner that reflects the interests of a range of stakeholder groups and being sustainable.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :is to provide the student with: the skills of assess, analyse and evaluate the contribution of business in terms of the economic and broader social contributions it makes.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Develop an understanding of the relationships between business and society
2. Analyse core concepts that relate to corporate social responsibility; corporate governance and corporate accountability
3. To examine that nature of work and employer responsibility
4. To evaluate the contribution of business to social inclusion and equality with particular reference to the third sector

Indicative Content
1. The changing context of business
The changing nature of organisations ¿ from industrial to post-industrial society; globalisation structures, processes and arguments;
2. Sustainable business practice:
Corporate social responsibility and The Business and Society Relationship; Corporate Citizenship: Social Responsibility, Responsiveness, and Business Performance
3. Employee well being at work
Employees as stakeholders: issues relating to privacy, safety and employee well-being
4. The role of third sector organisations;
Social and economic exclusion and business; understanding the conditions of inequality and social exclusion; factors influencing social mobility, The social contribution of third sector organisations.

BMT301 Description

The module allows students to gain an understanding of key areas of the subject from existing literature and from a set of example cases that illustrate operations and supply chains in many different settings and markets.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to apply their analysis skills to a variety of operations and supply chain management problems in both the product and service industries.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate and select appropriate approaches to designing, planning, monitoring and controlling operations and supply chains in a range of organisational and inter-organisational contexts.
2. Apply a range of contemporary supply chain and operational techniques to deal with the operational requirements and challenges.

Indicative Content
1. Operations Management in its Organisational Context
The operations function within the organisation and its relationship with other functional areas; The role of the operations manager.
2. Introduction to Supply Chain Management
The supply network; designing the supply chain (make or buy); supply chain stages; uncertainly and risk factors, value chain.
3. Capacity Management
Demand v. production, models of capacity planning, measuring capacity (utilisation and efficiency calculations)
4. Inventory Management
Why hold stock? Costs of inventory, ABC analysis, economic order quantity, inventory management strategies
5. Technology in Operations processes
E-supply chain, IT application in supply chain system, enterprise resource planning, technology strategies
6. The end-to-end supply chain
Purchasing and supply, materials and distribution management, logistics, balancing flow within a supply chain, managing bottlenecks and restrictions.
7. Outsourcing
Make or buy decisions in sourcing strategy; supplier selection; outsourcing supply chain management; co- ordinating supply and managing supplier relationships & partnerships, supply chain risks management
8. The customer interface
Meeting customer requirements, forecasting demand, lean operations and JIT, lean principles, reducing waste
9. Contemporary supply chain dynamics
Supply chain measures, six sigma, strategic alliances and collaborative partnerships, characteristics of supply chains in the contemporary global economy.

SPS301 Description

The overall purpose of this module is to develop students’ understanding of the concepts of coaching and learning and to apply these to physical activity environments. This will be achieved by explicitly addressing students’ knowledge of education and pedagogy and their ability to apply that knowledge in a suitable context. Students will move beyond a reductionist view of coaching simply as a systematic procedure and have students consider and discuss the influence of the social aspects of coaching such as leadership, relationships, and social environments.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the concept of coaching and learning through a model−based approach while giving them the basis for the conceptual study of sports coaching.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically explain how the concept of pedagogy and education apply to physical activity environments.
2. Analyse how different theoretical models describe the constituent parts of the coaching process and the coach’s role within this process.
3. Appraise the practical application of skill acquisition to coaching within physical activity environments.
4. Explain different participant groups, stages of development and environments and evaluate their impact on the coaching process.

Indicative Content
1. Coaching and learning
Students will consider the definition and purpose of coaching and learning. They will be asked to consider what is the purpose and definition of coaching, what it has to do with pedagogy and education.
2. The role of the coach
Students will be asked to consider the role of the coach, what their purpose is, and what they are trying to achieve. They will consider the level of participation, demands placed on coaches by external bodies, and coaches own philosophies towards the instruction of athletes.
3. The coaching process
Students will identify the key characteristics of coaching. They will consider a variety of leadership and relationship models and discuss how these fit into the idea of coaching as a systematic process.
4. Skill development
Students will examine the principles that underpin the creation on an efficient learning environment. They will consider modern theories of skill acquisition and how they relate to effective pedagogical.
5. Participant Groups
Students will consider different categorisations of participants and how this impacts on the planning and delivery of the coaching process.

SPS313 Description

This module explores contemporary issues in sport and exercise, particularly those they are likely to encounter and have to navigate in their future employment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : awareness and understanding of contemporary issues in sport and society.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to :
1. Identify and provide examples of contemporary issues in sport and society.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of historical, cultural and comparative sensitivities within contemporary issues in sport and society.
3. Critically examine sport culture through application of social theory and empirical research.
4. Produce ideas for progressive development of sport and exercise based on critical analysis of contemporary social issues.

Indicative Content
1. Social theory
Students will learn key aspects of social theory that can be/ have been used to explain phenomena in sport and exercise.
2. Inequality and discrimination
Students will explore the main sources of inequality and discrimination in sport and exercise (e.g., gender, social class, ethnicity, LGBTI)
3. Sport and politics
Students will explore how various political systems/ ideologies and governing bodies use sport/athletes as a vehicle for social control.
4. Ethics and sport
Students will learn about moral and ethical issues in sport and exercise (e.g., child protection). Sport and exercise cultures provide a unique environment for moral and ethical issues.

Sport and Management - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Sport and Management course.

Module 1: SPS204 Social Science of Physical Activity and Health

Module 2: BMT203 Researching Business

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Sport and Management course.

Module 1: SPS312 Research Methods

Module 2: SPS307 Managing Sport Policy and Development

Module 3: BMT303 The Future of Work

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

SPS204 Description

This module introduces the student to social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of key social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and describe disciplines within the study of physical activity and health that are associated with the social sciences.
2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of key issues in physical activity and health.
3. Identify key structures and governing bodies/policies associated with health and physical activity.
4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of methodologies associated with physical activity and health and what they help us to learn/explain.

Indicative Content
1. Interdisciplinary nature of social sciences
Students will explore the ways in which various disciplines within social science help us to understand and explain issues relating to physical activity and health (e.g., sociology of sport, sociology of health and illness, epidemiology, sport development, sport history)
2. Critically engage with the notion of ‘healthy’ lifestyles
Students will question the construction of ‘healthy’ living
3. Research topics within the social sciences
Students will make connections between the approaches/findings of physical activity and health research and how these inform debates around agency− structure
4. Political Ideology and Social Inequalities
Students will question the ways in which health and physical activity participation are framed by political ideologies and consider how and why this influences social inequalities
5. Qualitative methodologies
Students will be introduced to qualitative research and how it has developed our understanding of physical activity and health.

BMT203 Description

An introduction to research methods for real world research.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: an understanding of the principles of research methodology and the methods and processes for conducting research in business and management; and the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake an independent investigation in these fields.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Review current knowledge and establish its status and limitations;
2. Identify a business or management research problem/question and explain its relevance to practice and its significance as a potential contribution to existing knowledge;
3. Select and justify a research methodology to meet specified research aims and objectives;
4. Analyse and interpret primary/secondary research data.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to Research
Explaining the nature and purpose of research; Classifying the different types of research (quantitative qualitative, mixed methods) and how they map within the different philosophical paradigms (positivism, interpretivism, pragmatism).
2. Dealing with Practical Issues
Identifying the main stages in the research process; Identifying/generating a research topic and setting research objectives; Developing a research strategy; Identifying ethical issues in conducting research.
3. Searching and Reviewing the Literature
Explaining the purposes of a literature review and defining the main steps in conducting it; Searching, evaluating, organizing and synthesizing relevant literature.
4. Data Collection and Analysis
Approaches to qualitative and quantitative data collection; Data collection using a mixed-methods design.
5. Writing a Research Proposal
Purpose and structure of a research proposal.
6. Descriptive Statistics
Summarizing and visualizing data sets; Exploring the relationships between variables.
8. Inferential Statistics
Hypothesis testing; Selected hypothesis tests.

SPS312 Description

This module will develop students’ ideas about research in sport, exercise, physical activity and health, enabling them to better understand and appreciate published research and design their own research project.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to design and carry out a research project (in their final year of study).

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify, refine and rationalise a suitable and appropriate research question
2. Critique published literature in the field of sport, exercise, physical activity and/or health
3. Construct an appropriate and ethical research design
4. Obtain practical research skills in preparation for data collection and analysis

Indicative Content
1. The research process
Students will learn and engage in a research process by which they will come to understand the steps associated with planning and conducting a research process.
2. Formulating and refining research questions
Students will learn how research ideas are questions are generated and refined.
3. Research methodologies
Students will be exposed to various research methodologies (e.g., quantitative, qualitative and mixed−methods) in order to develop an appreciation of diverse approaches to research in sport, exercise, physical activity and health.
4. Ethical issues
Students will develop an awareness of the key ethical issues associated with research in sport, exercise, physical activity and health.
5. Practical skill development
Students will be given opportunities to develop their practical research skills in their chosen discipline area.

SPS307 Description

This module provides students with a critical overview of sports policy and development in the UK and to provide the student with the knowledge and expertise to evaluate sports development planning and development.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of sports policy, and the rationales for policy initiatives in the UK and to provide a methodological framework for analysis and evaluation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the policy making process and the political ideologies which shape sports policy
2. Provide an overview of the development of sport in the UK, outlining the key rationales, values and benefits underpinning sport and physical activity.
3. Critically discuss the contribution of relevant sport agencies and government departments to the sports policy process.
4. Critically analyse and reflect upon the sports planning and development process.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to managing sport development
Outline of the courses content and overall rationale.
2. Sport, exercise and physical body culture.
Sociological considerations. Making sense of sport in a sport development context.
3. UK Sport.
Emergence of sports development; Historical perspectives; Overview of key rationales and values underpinning sport and physical activity. Development of sport or development through sport.
4. Sport and social policy issues.
Health and well−being; Social welfare; Sports equality; Young people and education; Urban regeneration; Elite sport.
5. Ideologies underpinning sport.
Political Ideologies and the emergence of the New Right and New Labour. Rationales for sport policy initiatives. Policy making process. Models of policy development, planning and implementation.
6. Structures and governance of sport (in the UK context).
7. Strategic management and organisational theory.
8. Marketing and managing sports development.
9. Monitoring and evaluation.

BMT303 Description

This module examines how the complexities, dynamics and uncertainties of the contemporary business environment impacts on the organisation of work and the contemporary employment relationship.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :skills of analysis needed to assess the impact of a turbulent globalised business environment upon the future of management, the nature of work and the the employment relationship.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Examine the impact of changing business contexts on complex organisations and the resulting critical challenges
2. Examine the changing nature of work and new employment relationships
3. Assess the interplay of power, politics and conflict management in decision making and business operations
4. Evaluate the contribution of HR interventions in the future development of human capital with particular reference to knowledge intensive organisations.

Indicative Content
1. The future working context
The changing context of work, post bureaucratic society, Millennial, and high performance work contexts
2. The new employment relationship and new forms of control
Flexible work and the precariat, The changing nature of capital - emotional and aesthetic labour; The psychological contract;
3. Conflict in the workplace
The changing nature of power and politics in organisational decision-making and management practice. The changing nature of contemporary employee relations; organisational misbehaviour and counter-productive work behaviours
4. Human capital development
The learning organisation and organisational learning, technology mediated work processes, talent sourcing and human capability and knowledge management; career planning and development, rewards and recognition.
5. Outcomes
Learning from high performance organisations; Engaging employees, employee engagement and discretionary effort; building organisational resilience.

School of Business, Law and Social Sciences

Please find below the pathways for the following subject areas:

  • Accounting & Finance
  • Business Management
  • Marketing & Business
  • Law
  • Criminology
  • Sociology
  • Social Science

Accounting & Finance - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Accounting and Finance course.

Module 1: ECN201 Business Economics

Module 2: ANF201 Financial Accounting

Module 3: ANF202 Business Analytics

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Accounting and Finance course.

Module 1: ANF301 Corporate Finance

Module 2: ANF303 International Financial Accounting

Module 3: ANF304 Advanced Management Accounting

ECN201 Description

This module will provide an analysis of microeconomic structures and market failures and will introduce macroeconomic indicators and macroeconomic theory.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide students with tools to support business decision-making and business planning. In addition, the course aims to provide a background in macroeconomic theory, allowing students to critically assess potential policies.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of demand and supply.
2. Analyse different market structures
3. Understand strategic business decisions
4. Understand the macroeconomic conditions in which Governments and Firms operate
5. Comprehend potential market failures.

Indicative Content
1. Demand-Supply Analysis:
Product pricing decisions; Elasticity of demand; Demand forecasting; Cost estimation and forecasting; Input markets ; Labour markets and wages; Commodity markets and prices.
2. Market structure and potential Failure:
Perfect competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Deadweight loss and policies to limit excessive market power.
3. The Macroeconomic Environment:
Macroeconomic conditions and indicators; Macroeconomic Theory and policy; Policy impact assessment; Exchange rate and business.
4. Strategic Business Decisions:
Globalisation: Market entry and exporting decisions; Political risks; Theories of FDI; Outsourcing decisions. Vertical Integration. Diversification decisions. Application to business plans.

ANF201 Description

This module seeks to expose students¿ to regulatory frameworks that underpin the preparation of financial statements for different forms of business organisations. It also seeks to develop students¿ ability to prepare partnership accounts and limited liability companies¿ general-purpose financial statement based on relevant standards issued by the IASB.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the framework, both national and international, within which accounting statements are produced and the ability to prepare and present financial accounting statements for incorporated and unincorporated business entities.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. appraise the partnership as a form of business organisation and prepare accounts;
2. interpret the legislative and regulatory framework of limited company accounting, and prepare accounts;
3. Introduction to accounting and reporting frameworks.Preparation and presentation of general purpose financial statements based on the provisionsof relevant IASs/IFRSs issued by IASB.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to Accounting and Reporting Frameworks
Accounting framework for a sole trader, a partnership and a limited liability company.
2. Partnerships
Legal background. appropriations, admissions/retirements, dissolutions and conversion to a limited company.
3. Financial Statements for Limited Liability Comapmanies
Preparation and presentation of general purpose financial statements based on the provisions of relevant IASs/IFRSs issued by IASB.
4. Accounting treatments for current assets (inventories IAS2, trade receivables)
5. Accounting treatments for non-current assets (tangible/intangible/impairment IAS36)
6. Calculation and interpretation of accounting ratios and trends; Earnings per shareIAS33 limitations of ratios
7. Prepare and report financial performance to address financial information users and stakeholder needs
8. Financial Reporting and basic group accounting with associates IFRS3, IFRS10

ANF202 Description

This module introduces a number of modelling methods aiming at supporting organisational decision making.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with skills, concepts and techniques to support business decision making.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify data requirements and source required data in response to a task;
2. Make sense of and analyse data;
3. Interpret analysis results, gain insights into the interrelationships of different business aspects and their effect on organisational decision making, and use results/insights to inform decisions.

Indicative Content
1. Control and quality of decisions: Are we in control of our decisions; is decision making rational or emotional; what makes for a good decision; is decision making an art or a science.
2. Overview of business decision-making methods
including multi-criteria decision analysis; conjoint analysis, pareto analysis, SWOT analysis, etc.
3. Decision tables and decision trees
4. Basic business data analysis using Excel.
5. Business decision-making in practice, using a Business Simulation.

ANF301 Description

An introductory module on corporate finance.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge of the main sources of corporate finance and the ability to apply key techniques for using and managing financing in large and small organisations.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. demonstrate an understanding of some of the key theoretical concepts in corporate finance. in corporate finance;
2. analyse the impact of risk on various business and financial decisions.

Indicative Content
1. Time Value of Money
Future Value and Present Value; Annuities and Perpetuities; Quotes rates, Effective Annual Rate and Annual Percentage Rate.
2. Bond Valuation
Bond Pricing; Bond Ratings; Interest Rate Risk; Determination of Bond Yields.
3. Equity Valuation
Ordinary and Preference Shares; Cash Flow Valuation;
4. Capital Budgeting
Net Present Value, Payback Rule and Other Investment Criteria; Proforma Financial Statements; Special Cases of Discounted Cash Flow; Scenario Analysis; Sensitivity Analysis; Break-Even Analysis
5. Risk and Return
Expected Returns and Variances; Systemic and Unsystematic Risk; Diversification and Portfolio Risk; Systemic Risk and Beta; the Security Market Line and CAPM.
6. Cost of Capital
The Cost of Equity; the Cost of Debt and Preference Shares; the Weighted Average Cost of Capital.
7. Financial Leverage and Capital Structure Policy
The effect of Financial Leverage; Capital Structure and the Cost of Equity; Modigliani & Miller Propositions and the value of the firm; Optimal Capital Structure; the Pecking-Order Theory.
8. Dividends and Pay-out Policy
Cash Dividends and Dividend Payments; Does Dividend Policy Matter? Low vs. High-Dividend Payout; Shares Repurchases.
9. Short-Term Financial Planning and Management
Reasons for holding Cash; Understanding Float; Investing Idle Cash; Determining the Target Cash Balance; Optimal Credit Policy; Inventory Management.

ANF303 Description

Exploration of the application of Financial Accounting Theory and Practice to current issues in accounting, and development of international financial accounting theory and practice.

Aims
The aim of this module is to develop the student's critical awareness of contemporary developments of international financial accounting in theory and practice.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically evaluate the conceptual framework of financial accounting.
2. Evaluate conceptual and practical issues in accounting for assets, liabilities, gains and losses.
3. Determine the accounting treatment of specified financial transactions based on knowledge and understanding of conceptual models including acquisition and equity accounting in groups.
4. critically appraise contemporary issues concerning asset and liability measurement and disclosure of provisions, leases and pension.

Indicative Content
1. Statements of cash flows IAS7
Preparation of statements of cash flows. Cash and cash equivalents; classification of cash flows by activities, Indirect and direct methods. The Interests, dividends and taxes on cash flows. Working capital changes and cash flows.
2. Accounting for Groups
The conceptual basis of accounting for the investment of one entity in another entity; preparation of group accounts including inter- company balances, unrealised profit on inter-company sales and acquisitions during the year.
3. Accounting treatments under IAS and IFRS
Provisions IAS37, post balance sheet events IAS10 Leases, IAS17, IFRS16 Financial instruments. IAS32, IAS39, IFRS7, IFRS9

ANF304 Description

The module is concerned with the use of management accounting for management control and advanced numerical techniques in decision-making.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to use the most suitable analytical tools to assist in various decision situations.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse and comment on the effect of the application of management accounting systems on business organisations;
2. Apply appropriate analytical methods to accounting problems to provide solutions for management;
3. Collaborate effectively within a group, to develop and present a response to a given problem.

Indicative Content
1. Control
Divisional performance appraisal. Transfer pricing. Aspects of modern management practice and accounting issues within different sectors (including social enterprise). Business Plans and management reports..Life-cycle costing.
2. Decision Analysis
An introduction to Activity Based Costing and Activity Based Management. Decisions under uncertainty, including decision trees and the value of information.
3. Strategic Management Accounting Techniques
Value Management: value chain analysis, economic value added. The use of strategic management accounting techniques within an organisation: target costing, linear programming, Learning Curve and Experience Curve and Regression analysis and cost estimation and other forecasting techniques.Performance analysis in NPF organisations and the public sector.

Accounting & Finance - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Accounting and Finance course.

Module 1: ANF203 Management Accounting

Module 2: LAW256 Business Law (Accountants)

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Accounting and Finance course.

Module 1: ANF302 Taxation

Module 2: ANF306 Auditing

Module 3: choose one of the following options:

ANF305 Financial Markets

ANF413 Investments and Portfolio Management

ECN411 World Trade and Exporting

BMT402 Strategic Management and Leadership

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

ANF203 Description

This module extends the basics of management accounting in its role in shaping long term decisions, in planning and in control and presenting reports to management.

Aims
The aim of this module is to develop the students' ability to examine management accounting problems surrounding long term planning, control and decision making within the business unit.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. apply quantitative expertise in the use of appropriate management accounting techniques and account for the strengths and weaknesses of these methods;
2. explain the use of relevant management accounting theories and techniques in supporting business decisions;
3. work effectively as a member of a group, in providing a cohesive group presentation in response to a given assignment.

Indicative Content
1. Further issues in Costing
Overhead allocation, apportionment and absorption; compilation of process costing statements and joint costing statements using FIFO and Weighted Average considering opening and closing stocks; throughput costing
2. Marginal Costing
Cost-volume profit analysis for multi-product. Absorption and Marginal costing compared.
3. Capital Investment Appraisal
Investment appraisal methods; Net Present Value, Payback, Internal Rate of Return and Accounting Rate of Return. Strengths and weaknesses of these methods. Sensitivity analysis applied to capital investment appraisal.
4. Working Capital
The nature and importance of working capital. Management of working capital. Determining working capital needs.
5. Variance Analysis
Calculation and interpretation of variances. Reconciliation of actual to planned performance by means of variances. Distinguish between planning and operational and operational variances. Role of MRP and ERP systems in supporting standard costing systems.Material mix and yield variances, sales mix and quantity variances.

LAW256 Description

This module develops and applies aspects of the law of contract and examines commonly encountered commercial and consumer transactions.

Aims
In this module students will study the legal framework within which business organisations operate, and other legal concepts such as contract, including employment, negligence and other delictual responsibilities, agency, partnership and companies, and the regulatory environment in which business must operate.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the sources of law in Scotland and England, including the impact of the Human Rights Act 1998 and European law.
2. Explain the fundamental principles which govern the law of contract and the law of delict.
3. Demonstrate and understanding of employment law in relation to employment contracts, redundancy and dismissal.
4. Explain the principles relating to the laws of agency, partnership and company incorporation, with a focus on the formation and management of companies.
5. Explain the principles of the law of insolvency.

Indicative Content
1. Legal Systems
The nature of law; the distinction between civil and criminal law; the Scottish and English legal systems; the structure of the courts in Scotland and England; sources of law in the United Kingdom; European Union law and Institutions; Human Rights Act 1998; Scotland Act 1998
2. Law of Obligations – Contract, Employment and Delict
Nature and formation of contract; validity; contract terms; restrictive covenants; electronic contracts; breach of contract; remedies; employment contracts; dismissal from employment; redundancy; nature of delict; elements of negligence; causation; defences; professional negligence
3. Agency, Partnership and Incorporation
Creation of agency relationship and authority; relationship between agents and third parties; definition of partnership; relationship between partners and third parties; formation and constitution of companies; separate legal personality; lifting the corporate veil; minority protection
4. Management of companies
Directors and their duties; company officers and their responsibilities including auditors and secretaries; company meetings; resolutions; records; Bribery Act 2010; corporate criminal and fraudulent behaviour
5. Corporate Finance
Types, features and classes of share capital; issuing, allotting, paying and transferring shares, including to the general public; London Stock Exchange; dividends; loan capital; capital maintenance rules; debt finance;
6. Insolvency
Administration; receivership, including fixed and floating charges; liquidation.

ANF302 Description

A module introducing the main principles of taxes on corporate bodies, and of capital taxes as they apply to individuals and corporations. It also introduces the main principles of taxation of income of individuals and unincorporated businesses.

Aims
This module aims to advance students' understanding of the UK taxation system, the impact of various taxes, particularly corporation tax and capital taxes, on individuals, the interaction between taxes; tax avoidance; overseas aspects of personal and corporate taxes; UK income tax system.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the structure and administration of the UK tax system as it affects individuals;
2. prepare computations for showing trading profits and losses for unincorporated businesses.
3. demonstrate an understanding of Value Added Tax; and when the VAT is chargeable and recoverable;
4. prepare capital gains tax and inheritance tax computations; also understand and calculate the effect of residence, ordinary residence and domicile on UK tax liabilities;
5. prepare computations showing the profits chargeable to corporation tax for UK companies;
6. prepare computations showing the offset of losses in UK companies and utilise privileges of group status effectively.

Indicative Content
1. Taxation
A general introduction to taxation. Appreciation of the administrative procedures followed by the tax authorities in assessing and collecting taxes.
2. Trading Income
The nature of business profits assessable under the UK tax system. The computation of taxable profits and basis of assessment. The calculation of capital allowances. Setting-off of income tax losses for businesses run by sole traders and partnerships.
3. Taxation of the Individual
Independent taxation. Sources of income including benefits in kind. Personal allowances and reliefs. Losses arising from property income.
4. Value Added Tax
Principles, outputs and inputs, exemptions, zero rated, partly exempt businesses.
5. Corporation Tax and Corporate groups
Compilation of income assessable including capital gains. Rates of tax. Financial years and payment of tax. The effects of close company status.The use of losses in a single company context. The treatment of groups of companies and consortia. The application of capital gains tax provisions on transactions of companies.
6. Management of Personal Taxation
Calculation of capital gains/losses and liabilities arising on disposals. Principles of inheritance tax and treatment of liabilities arising on lifetime gifts and on death. Inter-relationship of taxes and identification of opportunities to minimise or defer taxation liabilities.
7. Tax planning and Overseas Taxation
Inter-relationship of taxes, planning, anti-avoidance and tax management. Overseas aspects of personal and corporate taxation.

ANF306 Description

An introduction to audit theory and techniques and the application of these theoretical concepts to practical situations.

Aims
The aim of this module is to introduce the student to audit theory, concepts and practices, and to develop the student's application of these to practical problems.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically appraise the social and economic need for auditing and the theoretical, statutory and professional framework within which the external auditor operates. Discuss current issues in auditing
2. Critically, evaluate risk-based audit strategies, and assess the nature and scope of audit objectives and audit evidence.
3. Understand the audit process and final report; apply the principles to auditing cases, solving problems therein.

Indicative Content
1. Audit Theory
The postulates of auditing and the enduring principles of auditing. Agency theory and auditing. The nature and value (usefulness) of key accounting information. Internal and External users.
2. Legal and professional considerations
Rules of professional conduct (independence etc.) Quality control and process monitoring. Companies Acts - Legal status of an audit; auditor appointment, resignation and removal; auditor rights, duties and remuneration; professional responsibility and liability.
3. Current issues
The auditor's responsibility for discovering fraud and error; Quality control and monitoring; Corporate Governance; Limiting the auditor's liability; Non- audit engagements undertaken by the auditor.
4. Risk based auditing
Business risk and its impact on audit risk; Analytical procedures; Understanding the industry; Audit planning.
5. Audit objectives
Testing controls; Balance sheet assertions; Types of tests; Types of evidence; Sufficiency and reliability of evidence.
6. The audit process - 1
Specific balance sheet items and related profit and loss account cycles. Audit completion procedures - events after the balance sheet date, contingencies, management representations and the overall review of financial statements.
7. The audit process - 2
Characteristics of information systems and control over systems reliablity. Use of the computer as an audit tool. Applying Computer Assisted Audit Techniques (CAATs). Introduction to group and specialised audits (e.g. Financial services).
8. Reporting and completion
Reports to management. Statutory audit reports. Special reports.

ANF305 Description

An introduction to Financial Markets and Institutions.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the role, functions and tools of the financial services industry in the context of both domestic economies and the world economy.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand current issues affecting financial markets and institutions and their customers;
2. Understand the workings of financial markets and institutions and the flow of funds between global markets.

Indicative Content
1. Money and the Financial System
The Six Parts of the Financial System; What is Money and How Can We Measure It?; The Payment System.
2. Bond Markets and Interests Rates
The Bond Market and the Determination of Interests Rates; Ratings and the Risk Structure of Interests Rates; The Yield Curve; Theories of the Term Structure of Interests Rates.
3. Stock Markets and Derivatives
The Essential Characteristics of Common Stock; Measuring the Level of the Stock Market; Investing in Stocks for the Long Run; What are Derivatives?; Forwards and Futures; Options; Swaps.
4. Financial Institutions
The Role of Financial Intermediaries; Information Asymmetries and Information Costs; Bank Management; Bank Risk: Where it comes from and what to do about it?
5. Central Banking and Monetary Policy
Understanding the Central Bank's Balance Sheet; Monetary Base; the Money Multiplier and Money Supply; Monetary Policy; Unconventional Monetary Policy Tools.
6. Regulation and Financial Crises
The Need for Regulating the Financial System; The Government Safety Net; Regulation and Supervision of the Financial System; Financial Crises.
7. Foreign Exchange
Exchange Rates Determination and Foreign Exchange Markets.
8. Current Topics on Financial Markets and Institutions
The Euro Debate; Socially Responsible Investment; Islamic Finance; Microcredit.

ANF413 Description

Aims
The aim of this module is to equip financial managers with the analytical tools to make sound investment decisions. The module is designed to be taught at an intermediate level and builds-up on the finance knowledge acquired in modules such as corporate finance or business finance.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically evaluate the benefits and limitations of investments in securities such as stocks, bonds and derivatives.
2. Demonstrate the ability to apply portfolio theory in decision making.
3. Critically evaluate the behavioural finance critique.

Indicative Content
1. The Investment Environment
The risk-return trade-off and the efficient pricing of financial assets are central to the investments process. The role of financial markets and their degree of efficiency is an important factor to support investors.
2. Fixed-Income Securities
Debt securities are often called fixed-income securities because they promise either a fixed stream of income or one that is determined according to a specified formula. These securities have the advantage of being relatively easy to understand because the payment formulas are specified in advance and there is no uncertainty about the size and time of their payments.
3. Equity Valuation
The price of a stock depends on the dividend and earnings that can be expected from the firm. In analysing a firm’s prospects, it often makes sense to start with the broad economic environment, examining the state of the aggregate economy and even the international economy. This analysis combined with the appropriate equity valuation model provides the guidance to the investor to operate in financial markets.
4. Portfolio Theory and Practice
Introduction to Risk, Return and the Historical Record. Risk Aversion and Capital Allocation to Risky Assets. Optimal Risky Portfolios.
5. Options, Futures and Other Derivatives
Introduction to Option Markets. Option Valuation. Futures Markets. Futures, Swaps and Risk Management.
6. Behavioural Finance and Technical Analysis
Understanding the behavioural critique. Technical Analysis and Behavioural Finance.

ECN411 Description

This module introduces students to the economics underpinning of international trade, provides a practical guide to exporting including the legal regimes applicable.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : an introduction to world trade and provide them with a range of tools to design strategies for exporting goods and services.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and evaluate the key economic issues which underpin world trade
2. Analyse and apply the principles and legal tools of the regulation of International Trade
3. Create an export business plan

Indicative Content
1. An introduction to world trade
The economic rationale for international trade, barriers to trade and international markets. World Bank data, current trade developments
2. Building the foundations for exporting
Are you ready for export? Writing an export Business Plan, prepping for exports
3. Creating and using online marketing platforms
Creating and using online marketing platforms. Online fundamentals, creating a social media and networking presence, marketing your business worldwide
4. Mapping your export journey
Choosing a product to export, exploring your territory, preparing and adapting your product for the export marketplace
5. Managing the transactions
Transport, logistics and fulfilment options; pricing and preparing quotations; getting paid
6. The institutions, bodies and legal tools
The World Trade Organisation, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, The United Nations (UNCTAD) and the World Customs Organisation
7. Some policies of the institutions and organisations
For example the Generalised System of Preferences and the incorporation of Development issues into International Trade regulation.
8. The effect on business of the International Regulation
To include the Vienna Sales Convention 1980, with a UK focus, letters of credit, cross border guarantees, international carriage of goods, by land, sea and air.

BMT402 Description

To succeed in the future, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets. The way in which organisations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy. The module examines the main concepts, approaches and tools of strategic management in the contemporary business environment. The module identifies tools of strategic analysis, discusses strategic choice available to a firm, examines elements and complexities involved in strategy formulation and implementation.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the fundamentals of how a firm can create and sustain a competitive advantage; fundamentals of leadership, and what role the strategic leader and leadership play in an organisation as well as in strategy formulation and implementation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate concepts and theories of business strategy and competitive advantage and their implications for contemporary business practice;
2. Critically identify and apply tools of strategic analysis of a firm that seeks growth and sustainable competitive advantage;
3. Assess strategic choices and formulate a strategy of a firm;
4. Understand theories of leadership and different roles of a leader in an organisation;
5. Critically evaluate the relationship between strategic management and leadership and analyse the role of the leader in the creation of the organisation¿s strategy and its implementation.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to strategic management
What is strategy; strategic analysis; classical and emergent schools; strategic thinking; levels of strategy.
2. Strategy context. Competitive advantage of a firm
Defining the business environment. Industry analysis: turbulences and dynamics. Porter¿s five forces; new dynamics in the 21st century.
3. Business level strategy: Sources of competitive advantage
Competitive stance, business level strategy, corporate level strategy; generic strategies; hybrid strategy; value chains.
4. Beyond competition
The nature of competition; co-operation; co-opetition; strategic alliances and joint ventures; mergers and acquisitions.
5. Managing change through effective leadership
Leadership - values and ethics. Managing stakeholders, change and uncertainty. Change management approaches.
6. Individual as a leader
Overview of trait, behavioural and situational theories. Moral aspects of leadership.
7. Leading as a team
Leader's role, coaching, conflict.
8. Organisational leadership
Charismatic and transformational leadership, crisis leadership.
9. Global and cross-cultural leadership
Leadership in multinational business environment and in the cross-cultural context.
10. Leadership and value creation
The role of leadership in creating value for a competitive advantage, strategy formulation and implementation.

Business Management - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Business Managment/Business & Human Resource Management courses.

Module 1: BMT207 The Business Environment

Module 2: ECN201 Business Economics OR BMT206 Introduction to Human Resource Management

Module 3: choose one of the following:

LAW251 Law

ANF202 Business Analytics

MKT203 Creativity, Innovation and Marketing

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Business Managment/Business & Human Resource Management courses.

Module 1: BMT301 Operations and Supply Chain Management

For modules 2 & 3, choose two of the following:

BMT302 Digital Business Strategy

BMT306 Business in Society

BMT307 Managing Across Cultures

ANF311 Business Finance

BMT207 Description

This module will introduce students to contemporary business issues

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :An introduction to a range of contemporary business issues and challenges that take place within national and global contexts.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Discuss the contexts in which businesses operate and their commitment to stakeholders.
2. Apply knowledge of a range of business frameworks to specific organisational challenges.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of supply and demand conditions on prices.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to Business
Business definitions. Business inputs and outputs, types of private sector firms, the public sector
2. The Business Environment
The nature of the external environment, business policy, PEST - the political, economic, social and technical environments.
3. The Economic Environment
What is economics, the market system, market structures, supply and demand.
4. The Competitive Environment
Five Forces Analysis, SWOT Analysis
5. Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethics
The emergence of CSR, Business ethics, Motivation for CSR, the triple bottom line.
6. Stakeholder Management
Stakeholder analysis, Stakeholder power/interest, Stakeholder interaction.
7. Innovation
Types and concepts of innovation, innovation and management strategies.
8. Small and Medium Sized Enterprises
Enterprise and entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, stages of growth, Impact of SMEs.
9. The Public Sector
Public sector management, public and private sector partnerships.

ECN201 Description

This module will provide an analysis of microeconomic structures and market failures and will introduce macroeconomic indicators and macroeconomic theory.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide students with tools to support business decision-making and business planning. In addition, the course aims to provide a background in macroeconomic theory, allowing students to critically assess potential policies.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of demand and supply.
2. Analyse different market structures
3. Understand strategic business decisions
4. Understand the macroeconomic conditions in which Governments and Firms operate
5. Comprehend potential market failures.

Indicative Content
1. Demand-Supply Analysis:
Product pricing decisions; Elasticity of demand; Demand forecasting; Cost estimation and forecasting; Input markets ; Labour markets and wages; Commodity markets and prices.
2. Market structure and potential Failure:
Perfect competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Deadweight loss and policies to limit excessive market power.
3. The Macroeconomic Environment:
Macroeconomic conditions and indicators; Macroeconomic Theory and policy; Policy impact assessment; Exchange rate and business.
4. Strategic Business Decisions:
Globalisation: Market entry and exporting decisions; Political risks; Theories of FDI; Outsourcing decisions. Vertical Integration. Diversification decisions. Application to business plans.

BMT206 Description

This module introduces students to the human resource management function within organisations

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of human resource management theory and practice.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the roles of line managers and human resource specialists in the effective management of people
2. Explore and analyse different approaches and techniques available to human resource management practitioners
3. Demonstrate how human resource management can add value to organisations

Indicative Content
1. Personnel management to human resource management- a historical perspective
The origins of personnel management, emergence of HRM, hard and soft hrm
2. The role of line managers and hrm practioners
The range and scope of HR activities, distinction between operational and strategic HR activities, the role of the line manager in HR activities,
3. Employee resourcing
Human resource planning; pre recruitment activities, recruitment, selection, employer branding
4. Employee development
Talent planning; training and development methods, designing learning and development, induction
5. Employee relations
Control, power and authority in the employment relationship, HRM and employee relations, employee voice, employee participation
6. Employee reward
Forms of reward, management of reward, reward systems, base pay. incremental pay schemes, contingency pay
7. Performance management
measuring performance, performance appraisal, dealing with poor performance

LAW251 Description

This module concentrates on the fundamental areas of civil law. The foundation for the study of any law subject is an understanding of the 'legal system' in general. After examining the nature and sources of law, the module then proceeds to consider contract, delict, and degree-specific legal contexts.

Aims
To examine the fundamental principles of law and the legal framework in Scotland and the UK.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of legal systems in the context of Scotland and be able to differentiate civil and criminal law and terminology.
2. Apply, in response to defined problems, the fundamental principles of the Scots law of obligations.
3. Apply the main principles in context.
4. Demonstrate skills of comprehension and application of legal principle.

Indicative Content
1. Legal Systems
The nature of law; the distinction between civil and criminal law;sources of law; the structure of the courts; impact of EU law on Scots law.
2. Contract
Nature and formation; essential features and validity; terms of the contract; breach of contract; extinction of contractual obligations.
3. Delict
Nature of delict; culpa and negligence; strict and vicarious liability; Consumer Protection Act 1987; defences to an action in delict.
4. Employment law and Business Organisations (Business Students and Sports students only)
Nature of employment and contractual relationship; unfair and wrongful dismissal; health and safety in the workplace. Business Organisations and legal framework- Law of Agency, Partnerships and Company law.
5. Employment law and Food Law (Food students only)
Nature of employment and contractual relationship; unfair and wrongful dismissal; health and safety in the workplace. Nature of Food law in UK and EU; registration/approval of food business establishments; labelling.
6. Criminal Law ( Criminology students only)
Principles of Scots criminal law. Requirements for mens rea and actus reus and causation. An introduction to the main features of selected crimes against the person such as homicide and assault (including common law and statutory aggravations). Selected defences to crimes against the person. Exculpating and mitigating factors.

ANF202 Description

This module introduces a number of modelling methods aiming at supporting organisational decision making.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with skills, concepts and techniques to support business decision making.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify data requirements and source required data in response to a task;
2. Make sense of and analyse data;
3. Interpret analysis results, gain insights into the interrelationships of different business aspects and their effect on organisational decision making, and use results/insights to inform decisions.

Indicative Content
1. Control and quality of decisions: Are we in control of our decisions; is decision making rational or emotional; what makes for a good decision; is decision making an art or a science.
2. Overview of business decision-making methods
including multi-criteria decision analysis; conjoint analysis, pareto analysis, SWOT analysis, etc.
3. Decision tables and decision trees
4. Basic business data analysis using Excel.
5. Business decision-making in practice, using a Business Simulation.

MKT203 Description

To evaluate the marketing function in business, discussing the practical nature of the discipline across the range of marketing functions.

Aims
The aims of this module are to provide the student with: An understanding of the marketing function in business and how a range of marketing subjects which include sales, advertising, branding event marketing and marketing research can be realised through creativity and innovation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate how the various marketing functions operate across a range of businesses and contexts.
2. Develop marketing solutions for a range of marketing problems in an apprentice style format.

Indicative Content
1. Nature and scope of marketing
Marketing as a contemporary business function, its use in combination with other business functions.
2. Market Orientation
Understanding how marketing and its multiple functions operate both inside and outside the organisation.
3. Being a marketer
Understanding the skills required to become a marketer through a series of practical led activities.
4. Evaluating the marketer
Critically reflecting on the type of marketer you are, a strategist, creative designer, analyst, sales person, event organiser, researcher or PR and advertiser.

BMT301 Description

The module allows students to gain an understanding of key areas of the subject from existing literature and from a set of example cases that illustrate operations and supply chains in many different settings and markets.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to apply their analysis skills to a variety of operations and supply chain management problems in both the product and service industries.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate and select appropriate approaches to designing, planning, monitoring and controlling operations and supply chains in a range of organisational and inter-organisational contexts.
2. Apply a range of contemporary supply chain and operational techniques to deal with the operational requirements and challenges.

Indicative Content
1. Operations Management in its Organisational Context
The operations function within the organisation and its relationship with other functional areas; The role of the operations manager.
2. Introduction to Supply Chain Management
The supply network; designing the supply chain (make or buy); supply chain stages; uncertainly and risk factors, value chain.
3. Capacity Management
Demand v. production, models of capacity planning, measuring capacity (utilisation and efficiency calculations)
4. Inventory Management
Why hold stock? Costs of inventory, ABC analysis, economic order quantity, inventory management strategies
5. Technology in Operations processes
E-supply chain, IT application in supply chain system, enterprise resource planning, technology strategies
6. The end-to-end supply chain
Purchasing and supply, materials and distribution management, logistics, balancing flow within a supply chain, managing bottlenecks and restrictions.
7. Outsourcing
Make or buy decisions in sourcing strategy; supplier selection; outsourcing supply chain management; co- ordinating supply and managing supplier relationships & partnerships, supply chain risks management
8. The customer interface
Meeting customer requirements, forecasting demand, lean operations and JIT, lean principles, reducing waste
9. Contemporary supply chain dynamics
Supply chain measures, six sigma, strategic alliances and collaborative partnerships, characteristics of supply chains in the contemporary global economy.

BMT302 Description

Exploiting technology to transform service delivery through Internet portals, intra-corporate connected environments, social networks, etc. and transforming internal processes and ways of working with partners are strategic issues considered by most organisations, both large and small. This module is about strategic analysis, formulating strategy in e-business where transactions are conducted over the Internet and/or with the use of digital technology, and e-business strategy implementation.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the fundamentals of strategic analysis and formulation and implementation of an e-business strategy for organisations concerned with doing business on the Internet and/or with the use of digital technology.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse e-business issues that impact organisational development and business transformation;
2. Apply e-business strategy to various business problems and solution contexts;
3. Identify opportunities and challenges involved in reaching customers via digital marketing and social media;
4. Understand a range of issues related to digital supply chain as part of e- business;
5. Explore implementation issues associated with the development of an e- business solution.

Indicative Content
1. Meaning and scope of e-business and e-commerce
Introduction and overview: current trends and issues. The evolution of e-business.
2. Analysis of firm's external environment
The macro-environment and implications for e-business ventures. Defining industry, segments and target markets for e-business.
3. Analysis of firm's internal environment
The meaning of core competence in e-business; the four virtual spaces of the ICDT framework for interaction with customers; the meaning of the company¿s value chain and value network.
4. Digital business strategy: Approaches
The elements of strategy design for digital business; application of generic strategies to e-business.
5. e-Business and the supply chain
The elements of supply chain management and their relationship to the value chain and value networks; strategic partnering.
6. Foundations of value creation in e-business
Understanding of what the value is and elements that contribute to value creation; the value grid and levers of e-value creation.
7. Dealing with disruptive innovations in e-business
Successful imitation and the barriers to imitation; how companies can assess the threat of a disruptive innovation; the ways to deal with a disruptive innovation in e- business.
8. Strategy for the internal organisation of e-business
Reasons that determine `make-or-buy¿ decisions in e- business; the organisational structures for e-business activities; the concept of value chain deconstruction and the role of the Internet for unbundling the corporation.
9. Choosing an e-business strategy for interacting with user
The trade-off between richness and reach in e-business; customer relationship management in the digital context; the concept of mass-customisation.

BMT306 Description

The module `Business in Society¿ aims to provide the student with an appreciation of the challenges facing contemporary business organisations in an operating context in which they are expected not only to demonstrate an economic contribution and shareholder value, but increasingly, are expected to do so in a manner that reflects the interests of a range of stakeholder groups and being sustainable.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :is to provide the student with: the skills of assess, analyse and evaluate the contribution of business in terms of the economic and broader social contributions it makes.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Develop an understanding of the relationships between business and society
2. Analyse core concepts that relate to corporate social responsibility; corporate governance and corporate accountability
3. To examine that nature of work and employer responsibility
4. To evaluate the contribution of business to social inclusion and equality with particular reference to the third sector

Indicative Content
1. The changing context of business
The changing nature of organisations ¿ from industrial to post-industrial society; globalisation structures, processes and arguments;
2. Sustainable business practice:
Corporate social responsibility and The Business and Society Relationship; Corporate Citizenship: Social Responsibility, Responsiveness, and Business Performance
3. Employee well being at work
Employees as stakeholders: issues relating to privacy, safety and employee well-being
4. The role of third sector organisations;
Social and economic exclusion and business; understanding the conditions of inequality and social exclusion; factors influencing social mobility, The social contribution of third sector organisations

BMT307 Description

In this module students will be introduced to current thinking on the effects of globalisation and culture on management practice and how national cultures shape the processes of employee development and organisational performance.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the different approaches to managing resources in different cultural settings and of the practical challenges of cross− cultural management in a global context.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse the relationship between national culture, organisational behaviour and management practice;
2. Evaluate the effects of globalisation/internationalisation of business and politics on local management, national resources and cultural values;
3. Analyse the recent trends and developments in cross−cultural management and to assess their effects on international trade and business.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction: The theoretical background
The meaning and importance of managing across− cultures, perceptions and models of culture and cultural differences in organisation theory and management studies. The context and dimensions of managing across cultures, convergence and divergence theories, and classification of the different approaches to managing in different countries.
2. Managing in the Anglo−Saxon countries
Analysing the Anglo−saxon approach to management; Managing in the USA and the UK.
3. Managing in Asian Countries
Effects of Confucianism, Communism and economic dynamism on management and organisation in East Asia countries; Managing in China, Japan and South Korea.
4. Managing in Western European Countries
Analysing the Francophone, the Germanic and other European models of management. The impact of the EU integration and expansion on employment and labour markets. Managing in France and Germany.
5. Managing in Less Developed Countries
From colonialism to dependency: the impact of international trade, transfer of knowledge and technology, ideologies and religous beliefs on management (mismanagement) and organisation in less developed countries. Managing in selected African and Middle−Eastern countries.
6. Contemporary issues of cross−cultural management
Global ethics and global labour markets: Gender, race, disability and age concerns. International organizations' responses to changing demographics; International organizations' responses to skills shortages. International approaches to managing diversity; and the use of IT in International HRM.

ANF311 Description

This module provides an introduction to business finance.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge of business finance along with an introduction to the financial environment, finance and the ability to apply key techniques for using and managing financing in large and small organisations.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a knowledge of the financial context in which businesses operate, and its impact on decision making.
2. Comprehend the key sources of finance and factors affecting the cost of capital.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to Financial Management
In these lectures, we will define finance and discuss its different subareas. After having an overall picture of the field of finance, we will discuss important variables in the business environment that can have a significant impact on the firm’s financial decisions.
2. Time Value of Money
In these lectures, we will study the time value of money (TVM). We will illustrate why money has a higher value today than in the future. We will also develop a set of tools that we will use throughout the rest of the module. We will start analysing single cash flows and then we will move onto annuity cash flows.
3. Understanding Financial Markets and Institutions
In these lectures, we will study the complex web of interdependent institutions and markets that are behind the transactions in the financial system. We will discuss the difference between primary and secondary markets and between money and capital markets. In addition, we will see the diverse types of institutions that form part of the financial system.
4. Bond Valuation
In these lectures, we will learn what bonds are, how to price them and why they are important to the firm.
5. Stock Valuation
In these lectures, we will learn what stocks are, how to price them and why they are important to the firm. In addition, we will look at the main stock markets in the world.
6. Risk and Return
In these lectures, we will introduce portfolio theory by learning how to characterise and estimate risk and return.
7. Calculating the Cost of Capital
In these lectures, we will introduce a very important concept in finance: the so called Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC). In simple words, WACC is the average cost per monetary unit of capital raised by the firm. We will learn how to calculate it and study why it is important.
8. Capital Budgeting
In these lectures, we will study net present value and other investment criteria and will analyse and discuss capital investment decisions.

Business Management - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Business Management/Business & Human Resource Management courses.

Module 1: BMT203 Researching Business

Module 2: BMT202 Project Management

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Business Management/Business & Human Resource Management courses.

Module 1: BMT303 The Future of Work

For modules 2 & 3, choose two of the following, or one of the following and one elective module

BMT308 Employee Relations and Engagement

MKT303 Communication and Creative Design

SPS307 Managing Sport Policy and Development

ANF305 Financial Markets

BMT203 Description

An introduction to research methods for real world research.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: an understanding of the principles of research methodology and the methods and processes for conducting research in business and management; and the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake an independent investigation in these fields.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Review current knowledge and establish its status and limitations;
2. Identify a business or management research problem/question and explain its relevance to practice and its significance as a potential contribution to existing knowledge;
3. Select and justify a research methodology to meet specified research aims and objectives;
4. Analyse and interpret primary/secondary research data.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to Research
Explaining the nature and purpose of research; Classifying the different types of research (quantitative qualitative, mixed methods) and how they map within the different philosophical paradigms (positivism, interpretivism, pragmatism).
2. Dealing with Practical Issues
Identifying the main stages in the research process; Identifying/generating a research topic and setting research objectives; Developing a research strategy; Identifying ethical issues in conducting research.
3. Searching and Reviewing the Literature
Explaining the purposes of a literature review and defining the main steps in conducting it; Searching, evaluating, organizing and synthesizing relevant literature.
4. Data Collection and Analysis
Approaches to qualitative and quantitative data collection; Data collection using a mixed-methods design.
5. Writing a Research Proposal
Purpose and structure of a research proposal.
6. Descriptive Statistics
Summarizing and visualizing data sets; Exploring the relationships between variables.
8. Inferential Statistics
Hypothesis testing; Selected hypothesis tests.

BMT202 Description

This module examines the tools and techniques associated with managing projects. Students will also carry out an investigation into a project failure and recommend alternative actions which could have been taken

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: an appreciation of the complexity of project management and the tools and techniques performed to aid successful management.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Select, use and explain the various tools and techniques which form part of the project planning and management process.
2. Analyse a project case study and identify where improvements could have been made.

Indicative Content
1. Project management and project teams
Intepreting project specifications and objectives, and the requirements of project stakeholders; Key project challenges for individuals and groups: reviewing the key priorities of time and project management; Understanding the role of a project leader; Understanding team work and how effective teams function; Creating and contributing to effective project teams; Managing teams through project delivery; maintaining goal focus, and managing problems.
2. Project analysis and planning
Analysing project requirements and sub-tasks; Estimating timelines; deadlines and milestones and activity durations; Constructing a project schedule; Resourcing projects; Allocating and smoothing resources; Using Gantt charts to allocate and monitor resource allocation; Project management tools; Using project management software.
3. Managing Projects
Dealing with project risk; Evaluating the probability and potential impact of risk; contingency planning for risk management; project tracking and revision to completion; Evaluating project delivery and management: Analysing the effectiveness of project management processes and the impact of project delivery and non-delivery.
4. Project Management Methodologies
The use of project management methodologies such as Prince2 and SCRUM.

BMT303 Description

This module examines how the complexities, dynamics and uncertainties of the contemporary business environment impacts on the organisation of work and the contemporary employment relationship.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :skills of analysis needed to assess the impact of a turbulent globalised business environment upon the future of management, the nature of work and the the employment relationship.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Examine the impact of changing business contexts on complex organisations and the resulting critical challenges
2. Examine the changing nature of work and new employment relationships
3. Assess the interplay of power, politics and conflict management in decision making and business operations
4. Evaluate the contribution of HR interventions in the future development of human capital with particular reference to knowledge intensive organisations.

Indicative Content
1. The future working context
The changing context of work, post bureaucratic society, Millennial, and high performance work contexts
2. The new employment relationship and new forms of control
Flexible work and the precariat, The changing nature of capital - emotional and aesthetic labour; The psychological contract;
3. Conflict in the workplace
The changing nature of power and politics in organisational decision-making and management practice. The changing nature of contemporary employee relations; organisational misbehaviour and counter-productive work behaviours
4. Human capital development
The learning organisation and organisational learning, technology mediated work processes, talent sourcing and human capability and knowledge management; career planning and development, rewards and recognition.
5. Outcomes
Learning from high performance organisations; Engaging employees, employee engagement and discretionary effort; building organisational resilience.

BMT308 Description

This module presents an overview of employee relations theory, practice and processes. It combines a theoretical approach to knowledge development in an applied and practitioner-oriented fashion. The module will contribute to the knowledge and skills typically expected in HR and management professionals.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with a framework within which to examine the role of the parties involved in the management of employee relations and the strategies for enhancing employee engagement contributing to positive organisational outcomes.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an appreciation of the theoretical underpinnings and evolution of employee relations and engagement studies
2. Evaluate the roles and functions of the different parties involved with effective employee relations
3. Evaluate contemporary approaches to the management of conflict and its resolution, bargaining, negotiations and management power
4. Examine the complexity of managing employee relations in a globalised business world
5. Evaluate a range of HR strategies and practices to raise levels of employee engagement in specific organisational contexts

Indicative Content
1. The changing nature of employee relations
From industrial to employee relations; Employee relations theoretical explanations; Employee relations and the global economy; Employee Relations – parties their roles and functions,
2. Employee relations in context
Local, National and International dimensions of employee relations; Trade unions, employer organisations and their role in employee relations; Employee relations and the law.
3. The employment relationship
HRM and employee relations – learning from practice;, Perspectives on power in employee relations; Partnership approaches to workplace relations; Organisational processes and the design and implementation of employment relations,
4. Employee engagement
History of engagement; Definitions; HR approaches to employee engagement; enablers; Communication within employee relations and employee engagement and the role of ‘voice’.
5. Employee relations and engagement: learning from practice
HR practitioners (public-private), CiPD and TU

MKT303 Description

To provide critical insight into the theory and practice of managing marketing communications and the role creative design plays in this as a method for developing better relations with customers.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a sound theoretical basis for decision- making in the fields of marketing communications and creative design.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically analyse the approaches, principles, management and contribution of marketing communications and creative design to businesses.
2. To develop creative communicative and design led solutions for a specified marketing problem.

Indicative Content
1. Marketing communications
The role of marketing communications in marketing strategy. The marketing communications process and theories which help us understand it. Discussing issues, integration and design of communications in business.
2. Public Relations
The role of public relations and marketing public relations, evaluating techniques, management and evaluation of approaches.
3. Communications toolkit
The toolkit evaluation comprises discussion of sponsorship, events and exhibitions, social media, digital and two-way engagement, the planning of approaches, budgetary considerations, campaign integration, measurement and creative design.
4. Campaigns
Planning the campaign: influencing factors, communications objectives, budget setting, media selection and scheduling, creative strategy, copy creation and creating media packs, campaign monitoring and evaluation.

SPS307 Description

This module provides students with a critical overview of sports policy and development in the UK and to provide the student with the knowledge and expertise to evaluate sports development planning and development.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of sports policy, and the rationales for policy initiatives in the UK and to provide a methodological framework for analysis and evaluation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the policy making process and the political ideologies which shape sports policy
2. Provide an overview of the development of sport in the UK, outlining the key rationales, values and benefits underpinning sport and physical activity.
3. Critically discuss the contribution of relevant sport agencies and government departments to the sports policy process.
4. Critically analyse and reflect upon the sports planning and development process.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to managing sport development
Outline of the courses content and overall rationale.
2. Sport, exercise and physical body culture.
Sociological considerations. Making sense of sport in a sport development context.
3. UK Sport.
Emergence of sports development; Historical perspectives; Overview of key rationales and values underpinning sport and physical activity. Development of sport or development through sport.
4. Sport and social policy issues.
Health and well−being; Social welfare; Sports equality; Young people and education; Urban regeneration; Elite sport.
5. Ideologies underpinning sport.
Political Ideologies and the emergence of the New Right and New Labour. Rationales for sport policy initiatives. Policy making process. Models of policy development, planning and implementation.
6. Structures and governance of sport (in the UK context)
7. Strategic management and organisational theory.
8. Marketing and managing sports development.
9. Monitoring and evaluation.

ANF305 Description

An introduction to Financial Markets and Institutions.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the role, functions and tools of the financial services industry in the context of both domestic economies and the world economy.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand current issues affecting financial markets and institutions and their customers;
2. Understand the workings of financial markets and institutions and the flow of funds between global markets.

Indicative Content
1. Money and the Financial System
The Six Parts of the Financial System; What is Money and How Can We Measure It?; The Payment System.
2. Bond Markets and Interests Rates
The Bond Market and the Determination of Interests Rates; Ratings and the Risk Structure of Interests Rates; The Yield Curve; Theories of the Term Structure of Interests Rates.
3. Stock Markets and Derivatives
The Essential Characteristics of Common Stock; Measuring the Level of the Stock Market; Investing in Stocks for the Long Run; What are Derivatives?; Forwards and Futures; Options; Swaps.
4. Financial Institutions
The Role of Financial Intermediaries; Information Asymmetries and Information Costs; Bank Management; Bank Risk: Where it comes from and what to do about it?
5. Central Banking and Monetary Policy
Understanding the Central Bank's Balance Sheet; Monetary Base; the Money Multiplier and Money Supply; Monetary Policy; Unconventional Monetary Policy Tools.
6. Regulation and Financial Crises
The Need for Regulating the Financial System; The Government Safety Net; Regulation and Supervision of the Financial System; Financial Crises.
7. Foreign Exchange
Exchange Rates Determination and Foreign Exchange Markets.
8. Current Topics on Financial Markets and Institutions
The Euro Debate; Socially Responsible Investment; Islamic Finance; Microcredit.

Marketing & Business - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Marketing & Business course.

Module 1: MKT202 Digital and Social Media Marketing

Module 2: ECN201 Business Economics

Module 3: choose one of the following:

BMT207 The Business Environment

ANF202 Business Analytics

MKT203 Creativity, Innovation and Marketing

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Marketing & Business course.

Module 1: BMT301 Operations and Supply Chain Management

Module 2: MKT301 Brand Management

Module 3: MKT305 Marketing Research in Theory and Practice

MKT202 Description

Introducing the role and importance of digital and social media marketing in today's businesses and marketing strategies.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : An understanding of how web-sites, social media and businesses digital footprint impact on marketing and marketing strategies.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate web, digital and social media presence individually and collectively in terms of their appropriateness to marketing efforts.
2. Develop digital marketing solutions for specified marketing problems.

Indicative Content
1. The nature of digital marketing
Traditional marketing, internet marketing, e-marketing, e-commerce, digital marketing: definitions and differences, the concept of conversion marketing, legal and ethical issues in digital marketing.
2. Understanding organisations and their web-sites
The concept of Business Models, application of these concepts to web-sites, digital marketing and social media, designing the customer interface and their use in the specification and evaluation of digital and social media.
3. Integrating a digital footprint into marketing strategy
Understanding and measuring the impact of 'digital' on marketing strategy, researching and profiling the online and digitally aware and active customer, information-processing, online buying, socially engaged customers.
4. Building customer traffic in the digital world
Comparing the effectiveness of online and offline campaigns and understanding digital methods of building traffic: interactive advertising, sponsorship and tenancies, search marketing, analytics, link-building, blogs and social networks, viral marketing.

ECN201 Description

This module will provide an analysis of microeconomic structures and market failures and will introduce macroeconomic indicators and macroeconomic theory.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide students with tools to support business decision-making and business planning. In addition, the course aims to provide a background in macroeconomic theory, allowing students to critically assess potential policies.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of demand and supply.
2. Analyse different market structures
3. Understand strategic business decisions
4. Understand the macroeconomic conditions in which Governments and Firms operate
5. Comprehend potential market failures.

Indicative Content
1. Demand-Supply Analysis:
Product pricing decisions; Elasticity of demand; Demand forecasting; Cost estimation and forecasting; Input markets ; Labour markets and wages; Commodity markets and prices.
2. Market structure and potential Failure:
Perfect competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Deadweight loss and policies to limit excessive market power.
3. The Macroeconomic Environment:
Macroeconomic conditions and indicators; Macroeconomic Theory and policy; Policy impact assessment; Exchange rate and business.
4. Strategic Business Decisions:
Globalisation: Market entry and exporting decisions; Political risks; Theories of FDI; Outsourcing decisions. Vertical Integration. Diversification decisions. Application to business plans.

BMT207 Description

This module will introduce students to contemporary business issues

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :An introduction to a range of contemporary business issues and challenges that take place within national and global contexts.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Discuss the contexts in which businesses operate and their commitment to stakeholders.
2. Apply knowledge of a range of business frameworks to specific organisational challenges.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of supply and demand conditions on prices.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to Business
Business definitions. Business inputs and outputs, types of private sector firms, the public sector
2. The Business Environment
The nature of the external environment, business policy, PEST - the political, economic, social and technical environments.
3. The Economic Environment
What is economics, the market system, market structures, supply and demand.
4. The Competitive Environment
Five Forces Analysis, SWOT Analysis
5. Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethics
The emergence of CSR, Business ethics, Motivation for CSR, the triple bottom line.
6. Stakeholder Management
Stakeholder analysis, Stakeholder power/interest, Stakeholder interaction.
7. Innovation
Types and concepts of innovation, innovation and management strategies.
8. Small and Medium Sized Enterprises
Enterprise and entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, stages of growth, Impact of SMEs.
9. The Public Sector
Public sector management, public and private sector partnerships.

ANF202 Description

This module introduces a number of modelling methods aiming at supporting organisational decision making.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with skills, concepts and techniques to support business decision making.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify data requirements and source required data in response to a task;
2. Make sense of and analyse data;
3. Interpret analysis results, gain insights into the interrelationships of different business aspects and their effect on organisational decision making, and use results/insights to inform decisions.

Indicative Content
1. Control and quality of decisions: Are we in control of our decisions; is decision making rational or emotional; what makes for a good decision; is decision making an art or a science.
2. Overview of business decision-making methods
including multi-criteria decision analysis; conjoint analysis, pareto analysis, SWOT analysis, etc.
3. Decision tables and decision trees
4. Basic business data analysis using Excel.
5. Business decision-making in practice, using a Business Simulation.

MKT203 Description

To evaluate the marketing function in business, discussing the practical nature of the discipline across the range of marketing functions.

Aims
The aims of this module are to provide the student with: An understanding of the marketing function in business and how a range of marketing subjects which include sales, advertising, branding event marketing and marketing research can be realised through creativity and innovation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate how the various marketing functions operate across a range of businesses and contexts.
2. Develop marketing solutions for a range of marketing problems in an apprentice style format.

Indicative Content
1. Nature and scope of marketing
Marketing as a contemporary business function, its use in combination with other business functions.
2. Market Orientation
Understanding how marketing and its multiple functions operate both inside and outside the organisation.
3. Being a marketer
Understanding the skills required to become a marketer through a series of practical led activities.
4. Evaluating the marketer
Critically reflecting on the type of marketer you are, a strategist, creative designer, analyst, sales person, event organiser, researcher or PR and advertiser.

BMT301 Description

The module allows students to gain an understanding of key areas of the subject from existing literature and from a set of example cases that illustrate operations and supply chains in many different settings and markets.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to apply their analysis skills to a variety of operations and supply chain management problems in both the product and service industries.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate and select appropriate approaches to designing, planning, monitoring and controlling operations and supply chains in a range of organisational and inter-organisational contexts.
2. Apply a range of contemporary supply chain and operational techniques to deal with the operational requirements and challenges.

Indicative Content
1. Operations Management in its Organisational Context
The operations function within the organisation and its relationship with other functional areas; The role of the operations manager.
2. Introduction to Supply Chain Management
The supply network; designing the supply chain (make or buy); supply chain stages; uncertainly and risk factors, value chain.
3. Capacity Management
Demand v. production, models of capacity planning, measuring capacity (utilisation and efficiency calculations)
4. Inventory Management
Why hold stock? Costs of inventory, ABC analysis, economic order quantity, inventory management strategies
5. Technology in Operations processes
E-supply chain, IT application in supply chain system, enterprise resource planning, technology strategies
6. The end-to-end supply chain
Purchasing and supply, materials and distribution management, logistics, balancing flow within a supply chain, managing bottlenecks and restrictions.
7. Outsourcing
Make or buy decisions in sourcing strategy; supplier selection; outsourcing supply chain management; co- ordinating supply and managing supplier relationships & partnerships, supply chain risks management
8. The customer interface
Meeting customer requirements, forecasting demand, lean operations and JIT, lean principles, reducing waste
9. Contemporary supply chain dynamics
Supply chain measures, six sigma, strategic alliances and collaborative partnerships, characteristics of supply chains in the contemporary global economy.

MKT301 Description

To provide critical insight into the role of brand and branding in business and marketing products and services to customers.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : an understanding of how brands and branding impact on the competitive position of businesses.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically evaluate brand and branding in terms of the application and appropriateness to marketing efforts.
2. Develop branding solutions for a specified marketing problem.

Indicative Content
1. Managing the brand and branding
The influences and issues involved in developing and implementing branding strategies in local, national and international contexts.
2. Marketing and the brand
The role of branding in marketing strategy, examining theories and approaches to ensure a positive correlation between brand development, maintenance and profitability.
3. The brand campaign
Planning brand campaigns, considering influencing factors, communications, budget, media selection, scheduling, creativity, monitoring and evaluation.
4. Decision making in branding strategies
Understanding the nature, scope and contribution of branding decisions and the criteria for, and problems with selecting appropriate strategies.

 

MKT305 Description

To provide insight into marketing research for academic and practical purposes.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: an understanding of the nature and purpose of, and approaches to, academic and practical marketing research, and to develop appropriate research knowledge and skills.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate, justify and select an appropriate research methodology to meet specified research aims and objectives.
2. Analyse and interpret data in a marketing context.
3. Develop a research-based solution for a specified marketing problem.

Indicative Content
1. The purpose of marketing research
To develop understanding of marketing research, where it comes from and how it could and should be applied using a variety of contexts.
2. Designing the research question and strategy
Formulating research questions through understanding the literature, gaps in the research and then developing an appropriate research question and methodologies, understanding their role, limitations and criteria for selection.
3. Primary research methodologies
Understand approaches to primary research, qualitative and quantitative research methods. Dealing with generalisability, validity and reliability in method selection.
4. Analysing data and preparing reports
Understanding qualitative and quantitative data analysis, the management and interpretation of that data and providing recommendations in the form of a report based on that analysis.

Marketing & Business - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Marketing & Business course.

Module 1: MKT204 Sales and Selling

Module 2: BMT202 Project Management

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Marketing & Business course.

Module 1: BMT303 The Future of Work

Module 2: MKT303 Communication and Creative Design

Module 3: choose one of the following or one elective module

BMT308 Employee Relations and Engagement

SPS307 Managing Sport Policy and Development

ANF305 Financial Markets

MKT204 Description

This module provides a thorough examination of the personal selling process and the nature of, and decisions involved in, sales and selling.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a theoretical knowledge and appreciation of the context, nature, practice and management of the sales force and selling in businesses.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate the nature and role of personal selling and sales management, the interaction between business and customer and the effectiveness of processes, training and techniques to marketing efforts.
2. Develop creative sales and selling solutions for a specified marketing problem.

Indicative Content
1. TThe Context of Personal Selling and Sales Management
Personal selling and the role of the sales force in a businesses marketing efforts. Discussing the types of selling and the importance of sales tactics.
2. The Personal Selling Process
Nature and importance of understanding buyer behaviour, the stages in the personal selling process and influences on this process. The role of relationship building and the management of questions in personal selling.
3. Sales Management Decisions
Nature and role of sales management, the importance of leadership and an analysis of the major decisions in sales force management, including recruitment and selection, training. Management of major accounts. The influences on sales management decisions and its role in marketing efforts.
4. Controlling the Sales Force
Nature of, and techniques involved in, sales forecasting, budgeting and determinants and methods of evaluating selling and sales force effectiveness.

BMT202 Description

This module examines the tools and techniques associated with managing projects. Students will also carry out an investigation into a project failure and recommend alternative actions which could have been taken

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: an appreciation of the complexity of project management and the tools and techniques performed to aid successful management.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Select, use and explain the various tools and techniques which form part of the project planning and management process.
2. Analyse a project case study and identify where improvements could have been made.

Indicative Content
1. Project management and project teams
Intepreting project specifications and objectives, and the requirements of project stakeholders; Key project challenges for individuals and groups: reviewing the key priorities of time and project management; Understanding the role of a project leader; Understanding team work and how effective teams function; Creating and contributing to effective project teams; Managing teams through project delivery; maintaining goal focus, and managing problems.
2. Project analysis and planning
Analysing project requirements and sub-tasks; Estimating timelines; deadlines and milestones and activity durations; Constructing a project schedule; Resourcing projects; Allocating and smoothing resources; Using Gantt charts to allocate and monitor resource allocation; Project management tools; Using project management software.
3. Managing Projects
Dealing with project risk; Evaluating the probability and potential impact of risk; contingency planning for risk management; project tracking and revision to completion; Evaluating project delivery and management: Analysing the effectiveness of project management processes and the impact of project delivery and non-delivery.
4. Project Management Methodologies
The use of project management methodologies such as Prince2 and SCRUM.

BMT303 Description

This module examines how the complexities, dynamics and uncertainties of the contemporary business environment impacts on the organisation of work and the contemporary employment relationship.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :skills of analysis needed to assess the impact of a turbulent globalised business environment upon the future of management, the nature of work and the the employment relationship.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Examine the impact of changing business contexts on complex organisations and the resulting critical challenges
2. Examine the changing nature of work and new employment relationships
3. Assess the interplay of power, politics and conflict management in decision making and business operations
4. Evaluate the contribution of HR interventions in the future development of human capital with particular reference to knowledge intensive organisations.

Indicative Content
1. The future working context
The changing context of work, post bureaucratic society, Millennial, and high performance work contexts
2. The new employment relationship and new forms of control
Flexible work and the precariat, The changing nature of capital - emotional and aesthetic labour; The psychological contract;
3. Conflict in the workplace
The changing nature of power and politics in organisational decision-making and management practice. The changing nature of contemporary employee relations; organisational misbehaviour and counter-productive work behaviours
4. Human capital development
The learning organisation and organisational learning, technology mediated work processes, talent sourcing and human capability and knowledge management; career planning and development, rewards and recognition.
5. Outcomes
Learning from high performance organisations; Engaging employees, employee engagement and discretionary effort; building organisational resilience.

MKT303 Description

To provide critical insight into the theory and practice of managing marketing communications and the role creative design plays in this as a method for developing better relations with customers.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a sound theoretical basis for decision- making in the fields of marketing communications and creative design.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically analyse the approaches, principles, management and contribution of marketing communications and creative design to businesses.
2. To develop creative communicative and design led solutions for a specified marketing problem.

Indicative Content
1. Marketing communications
The role of marketing communications in marketing strategy. The marketing communications process and theories which help us understand it. Discussing issues, integration and design of communications in business.
2. Public Relations
The role of public relations and marketing public relations, evaluating techniques, management and evaluation of approaches.
3. Communications toolkit
The toolkit evaluation comprises discussion of sponsorship, events and exhibitions, social media, digital and two-way engagement, the planning of approaches, budgetary considerations, campaign integration, measurement and creative design.
4. Campaigns
Planning the campaign: influencing factors, communications objectives, budget setting, media selection and scheduling, creative strategy, copy creation and creating media packs, campaign monitoring and evaluation.

BMT308 Description

This module presents an overview of employee relations theory, practice and processes. It combines a theoretical approach to knowledge development in an applied and practitioner-oriented fashion. The module will contribute to the knowledge and skills typically expected in HR and management professionals.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with a framework within which to examine the role of the parties involved in the management of employee relations and the strategies for enhancing employee engagement contributing to positive organisational outcomes.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an appreciation of the theoretical underpinnings and evolution of employee relations and engagement studies
2. Evaluate the roles and functions of the different parties involved with effective employee relations
3. Evaluate contemporary approaches to the management of conflict and its resolution, bargaining, negotiations and management power
4. Examine the complexity of managing employee relations in a globalised business world
5. Evaluate a range of HR strategies and practices to raise levels of employee engagement in specific organisational contexts

Indicative Content
1. The changing nature of employee relations
From industrial to employee relations; Employee relations theoretical explanations; Employee relations and the global economy; Employee Relations – parties their roles and functions,
2. Employee relations in context
Local, National and International dimensions of employee relations; Trade unions, employer organisations and their role in employee relations; Employee relations and the law.
3. The employment relationship
HRM and employee relations – learning from practice;, Perspectives on power in employee relations; Partnership approaches to workplace relations; Organisational processes and the design and implementation of employment relations,
4. Employee engagement
History of engagement; Definitions; HR approaches to employee engagement; enablers; Communication within employee relations and employee engagement and the role of ‘voice’.
5. Employee relations and engagement: learning from practice
HR practitioners (public-private), CiPD and TU

SPS307 Description

This module provides students with a critical overview of sports policy and development in the UK and to provide the student with the knowledge and expertise to evaluate sports development planning and development.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of sports policy, and the rationales for policy initiatives in the UK and to provide a methodological framework for analysis and evaluation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the policy making process and the political ideologies which shape sports policy
2. Provide an overview of the development of sport in the UK, outlining the key rationales, values and benefits underpinning sport and physical activity.
3. Critically discuss the contribution of relevant sport agencies and government departments to the sports policy process.
4. Critically analyse and reflect upon the sports planning and development process.

Indicative Content
1. Introduction to managing sport development
Outline of the courses content and overall rationale.
2. Sport, exercise and physical body culture.
Sociological considerations. Making sense of sport in a sport development context.
3. UK Sport.
Emergence of sports development; Historical perspectives; Overview of key rationales and values underpinning sport and physical activity. Development of sport or development through sport.
4. Sport and social policy issues.
Health and well−being; Social welfare; Sports equality; Young people and education; Urban regeneration; Elite sport.
5. Ideologies underpinning sport.
Political Ideologies and the emergence of the New Right and New Labour. Rationales for sport policy initiatives. Policy making process. Models of policy development, planning and implementation.
6. Structures and governance of sport (in the UK context)
7. Strategic management and organisational theory.
8. Marketing and managing sports development.
9. Monitoring and evaluation.

ANF305 Description

An introduction to Financial Markets and Institutions.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the role, functions and tools of the financial services industry in the context of both domestic economies and the world economy.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand current issues affecting financial markets and institutions and their customers;
2. Understand the workings of financial markets and institutions and the flow of funds between global markets.

Indicative Content
1. Money and the Financial System
The Six Parts of the Financial System; What is Money and How Can We Measure It?; The Payment System.
2. Bond Markets and Interests Rates
The Bond Market and the Determination of Interests Rates; Ratings and the Risk Structure of Interests Rates; The Yield Curve; Theories of the Term Structure of Interests Rates.
3. Stock Markets and Derivatives
The Essential Characteristics of Common Stock; Measuring the Level of the Stock Market; Investing in Stocks for the Long Run; What are Derivatives?; Forwards and Futures; Options; Swaps.
4. Financial Institutions
The Role of Financial Intermediaries; Information Asymmetries and Information Costs; Bank Management; Bank Risk: Where it comes from and what to do about it?
5. Central Banking and Monetary Policy
Understanding the Central Bank's Balance Sheet; Monetary Base; the Money Multiplier and Money Supply; Monetary Policy; Unconventional Monetary Policy Tools.
6. Regulation and Financial Crises
The Need for Regulating the Financial System; The Government Safety Net; Regulation and Supervision of the Financial System; Financial Crises.
7. Foreign Exchange
Exchange Rates Determination and Foreign Exchange Markets.
8. Current Topics on Financial Markets and Institutions
The Euro Debate; Socially Responsible Investment; Islamic Finance; Microcredit.

Law - Semester 1

This pathway is from the 2nd and 3rd years of the LLB Law course.

Choose 3 of the following modules:

LAW202 Law of Succession

LAW205 Family Law

LAW206 Business Transactions

LAW305 Legal Philosophy and Human Rights

LAW307 Employment Law

LAW202 Description

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the fundamental knowledge, skills and practical understanding of the law of Succession and Trusts

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Explain and apply the principles of the law of Succession in Scotland in relation to testate and intestate succession;
2. Explain and apply the principles of law in relation to Trusts and understand the uses of trusts in succession, family situations and commercial transactions;
3. Apply those skills by drafting wills and other documents; and
4. Demonstrate skills of comprehension, application of legal principle and reflection

Indicative Content
1. Intestate Succession
Succession in moveables and heritage; prior rights; legal rights; collation; order of succession re spouses, children, cohabitants, civil partners law reform
2. Testate Succession
Capacity and diminished capacity; execution and amendment of wills; uncertainty; revocation; subsequent births; transfer of heritage; classification of legacies; accretion; election; residue, division per capita and per stirpes; destinations-over; the unworthy heir; missing persons; common calamity; public policy considerations; and forfeiture
3. Will Substitutes
Nominations; special destinations; liferent and fee; and survivorship.
4. Trusts
Constitution; public and private; charitable trusts; uncertainty; revocability; liferents; vesting; variation; termination of trust; law reform
5. Trustees
Appointment; assumption and resignation; administration; duties; powers; breach of trust and remedies; investment powers; liability to creditors; discharge; law reform
6. Drafting and Interpretation of Wills
Words of severance and conjunction; terms; public policy considerations; prohibitions of accumulations and successive liferents; conditional institution and substitution
7. Inheritance Tax
An overview of the structure and charging of inheritance tax.
8. Adults with Incapacity
Recognition of the issues relating to elderly and other adults who are incapable of managing their affairs; Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000; continuing financial and welfare attorneys; financial and welfare guardianship; intervention orders; power to intromit with accounts; The Office of the Public Guardian in Scotland; human rights concerns; and law reform.

LAW205 Description

An introduction to the legal principles governing family relationships and their breakdown, children and parenthood in Scotland.

Aims
The aim of this module is to examine the key legal principles governing family relationships and their breakdown, children and parenthood in Scotland.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Define and analyse the requirements for a valid marriage or civil partnership.
2. Explain and discuss the legal rights of spouses, civil partners and cohabitants to property brought into and acquired during the relationship.
3. Explain and discuss the legal rights, duties and obligations which arise as a result of the legal relationship between parents and their children.
4. Identify the grounds of divorce and dissolution and understand the statutory legal principles governing the division of property on relationship breakdown.
5. Demonstrate skills of comprehension and application of legal principles, negotiation and reflection.

Indicative Content
1. Parent and Child
Parental responsibilities and rights; adoption; local authority intervention; human rights of family members.
2. Marriage and Civil Partnership
Regular and irregular marriage; Same sex marriage; validity of civil and religious marriages; prohibitions and legal impediments to marriage; void and voidable marriages. Civil Partnerships and Gender Recognition.
3. Rights Arising out of Marriage and Civil Partnership
Aliment, separate property rights.
4. Family Homes and Family Protection
Occupancy rights of spouses, civil partners and cohabitants, exclusion orders.
5. Relationship Breakdown
Grounds in divorce & dissolution actions. Division of property on relationship breakdown including financial provision, property transfer orders and decrees regulating occupancy rights.

LAW206 Description

Aims
To identify and examine the principles of Scots commercial law, consumer law and finance as they relate to business and consumer transactions.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principles and transactions of commercial law and consumer law in Scotland
2. Formulate structured written answers to defined commercial and consumer law issues
3. Provide written advice for hypothetical clients on consumer and/or commercial law problems
4. Demonstrate a clear understanding of the way in which commercial and consumer law operate to promote good business practice

Indicative Content
1. Sale and supply of goods and services to businesses
Contract of sale and related contracts to businesses: implied terms, transfer of property and risk, breach and remedies, operation of the Sale of Goods Act 1979,Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982 and the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977
2. Sale and supply of goods and services to consumers:
Consumer Rights Act 2015, Consumer Protection Act 1987, Consumer contracts regulations
3. Rights in Security
Rights in security over moveables, lien, pledge, hypothec, standard securities, floating charges, guarantees and cautionary obligations.
4. Debt recovery and personal insolvency
Diligence: attachment inhibition, arrestment, adjudication and money attachment. Personal insolvency and the Bankruptcy (Scotland) Act 2016.
5. Insurance
The common law of insurance: operation of the Third Parties (Rights against Insurers) Act 2010, the Consumer Insurance (Disclosures and Representations) Act 2010, the Insurance Act 2015
6. Consumer credit and consumer finance
Consumer Credit Act 1974, hire purchase, loans, banking practice, mortgages, personal savings and investments, pensions, stocks and shares, basic rules of taxation and money laundering
7. Arbitration and ADR
ADR forms such as negotiation, mediation and arbitration. Arbitration in Scotland: Arbitration (Scotland) Act 2010

LAW305 Description

An examination of the theories and concepts which underpin law, with further detailed consideration of Human Rights Law.

Aims
The aim of this module is to develop the student's understanding of the theories and concepts which underpin law, and the application of Human Rights Law.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse the development of the Western legal tradition and fundamental legal concepts.
2. Critically evaluate different schools of thought within the Western Legal Tradition
3. Understand and critically apply the principles of Human Rights law
4. Demonstrate higher level legal writing skills and apply legal skills and knowledge in a practical and theoretical context
5. Demonstrate oral skills and knowledge in a practical and theoretical context through debating contested and conflicting philosophical views

Indicative Content
1. Fundamental Legal Concepts
Law, the State and the individual; law and other disciplines; the role of lawyers, rule of law; concepts of rights and justice
2. Development of the Western Legal Tradition
Global legal systems; the Western Legal Tradition;natural law theories; the Utilitarians; Kant; Marx
3. Legal Theories of the 20th Century
Legal theories of the 20th century: American realism; legal positivism; liberalism; legal sociology; critical legal theory, feminism and race; post-modernism
4. Human Rights
UN Human Rights instruments; The European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms; The Scotland Act 1998; The Human Rights Act 1998; the impact of human rights law in Scotland and the UK

LAW307 Description

This module examines the individual contract of employment at common law and under statute and the regulation which applies to that contract

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with ability to critically analyse and evaluate the law and policy relating to the employment relationship.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse and apply the principles of employment law.
2. Analyse and apply the principles of contract and delict to the employment relationship
3. Analyse and discuss critically the impact of EU Law on the contract of employment
4. Demonstrate higher level legal oral and writing skills and apply legal skills and knowledge in a practical and/or theoretical context while reflecting thereon.

Indicative Content
1. Formation of the Contract of Employment
Definition; form; jurisdiction and choice of law, continuous employment; fixed-term, retiring age.
2. Administration of Employment Law
The Tribunals system; the Department for Business Innovation and Skills and other agencies active in this field e.g. ACAS, Equality and Human Rights Commission.
3. Terms of the Contract
Minimum statutory requirements; express, implied, custom, collective agreements. Terms imposed by the common law and modified by statute. Employment protection provided by statute: e.g. suspension from work; family friendly working rights; pay; insolvency of employer.
4. Discrimination in Employment
General; Equality Act 2010 and protected characteristics of gender reassignment, race, disability, age, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation, pregnancy and maternity, and marriage and civil partnership; equal pay
5. Discipline and Grievance
Works' rules and procedures; ACAS recommended practice.
6. Transfer of a Business
UK implementation of EU Directives; rights of transferred employees.
7. Termination of the Contract of Employment
Notice; dismissal: wrongful, unfair; redundancy; remedies.

Law - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the LLB Law course.

Module 1: LAW208 EU Law

Module 2: LAW201 Public Law 2

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the LLB Law course.

Module 1: LAW302 Law of Evidence

Module 2: LAW308 Business Organisations

Module 3: LAW300 Law of Property

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

LAW208 Description

This module examines the constitutional and legal framework of the European Union and its key institutions, the law relating to the single market within the EU and the principles of free movement and EU citizenship, as well as considering the constitutional implications and procedures of Brexit.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge and understanding of the constitutional and administrative framework of the EU, the principles of the EU legal system, and aspects of substantive EU law.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. analyse, examine and discuss the role and rationale of the EU institutions
2. analyse and discuss the relationship between national and EU law
3. analyse, examine and discuss the key features of the EU legal system: supremacy, direct effects, general principles, references, infringement proceedings, judicial review, and state liability
4. analyse and apply the principles of EU free movement, competition and equality law.
5. identify, state and apply legal principles and demonstrate skills of oral and written communication and legal reasoning.
6. Analyse and examine the key procedures arising from Brexit and the UK’s withdrawal agreement.

Indicative Content
1. History
History, objective and evolution of the treaties and legislation.
2. Institutions
Principal institutions of the EU, including Commission, Council, Courts, Parliament, ECB, Court of Auditors; other important bodies such as the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions.
3. Judicial Role
References, review, principles of supremacy, direct and indirect effects, state liability, general principles. The procedures of the Court of Justice
4. Law of the EU internal market
Free movement of Goods, Services, Persons and Capital; Right of Establishment in another member state.
5. EU equality law
Sex, race, disability, age, sexual orientation, religious or other belief
6. Brexit
The UK and the EU, Article 50, withdrawal agreement.

LAW201 Description

An introduction to the key doctrines and legal principles of administrative law in the United Kingdom with particular reference to Scotland.

Aims
The aim of this module is to introduce students to the key principles of administrative law in the United Kingdom with particular reference to Scotland.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and explain the legal framework of administrative justice in the UK.
2. Understand and explain the relationship between the citizen and the state.
3. Understand the operation of judicial review in Scotland.
4. Identify, state and apply legal principles and demonstrate skills of written and oral communication and legal reasoning.

Indicative Content
1. Administrative Law
Basic concepts, ultra vires, standing in administrative proceedings. Redressing grievances in the public sector.
2. Judicial Review
Tripartite relationships, excess and abuse of power, the ultra vires doctrine, Wednesbury reasonableness, natural justice and other grounds of judicial review.
3. Ombudsmen
Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsmen, Scottish Public Services Ombudsman.
4. Liability of the Crown and Public Authorities
Crown Proceedings Act 1947, Liability in Delict and Contract, Remedies, Crown Privilege and Public Interest Immunity.
5. Citizen and the State
Citizenship, Nationality, Immigration, Asylum, Deportation, Extradition, European Arrest Warrants, freedom of information
6. Human Rights and Civil Liberties
ECHR, Human Rights Act 1998, Commission for Equality and Human Rights, Police powers, Public order, State security and Official Secrets, Anti-terrorism measures. Privacy and data protection.

LAW302 Description

This module examines the legal rules governing the relevance, admissibility and sufficiency of evidence in civil and criminal proceedings in the courts of law in Scotland.

Aims
The aim of this module is to examine critically the principles governing the relevance, admissibility and sufficiency of evidence in civil and criminal litigation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand and apply the rules of evidence concerning relevance, admissibility, weight and sufficiency of evidence;
2. Evaluate the legal concept of corroboration as applied in Scots Law
3. Analyse and apply the legal concepts of competence and compellability of witnesses as applied in Scots Law
4. Evaluate the legal concept of privileged evidence in Scots Law
5. Demonstrate higher level legal writing and oral skills and apply legal skills and knowledge in a practical and/or theoretical context.

Indicative Content
1. Basic Concepts
Purpose, Relevance, admissibility, weight and sufficiency of evidence. Burdens and standards of proof, human rights issues
2. Requirements for proof
Presumptions, judicial knowledge, judicial admissions.
3. Types of evidence
Oral, documentary, real evidence, direct and circumstantial, primary and secondary evidence, the best evidence rule.
4. Corroboration
The common law in civil and criminal proceedings, The Moorov doctrine; admissions and confessions, corroboration by distress, dock and other identification, the Civil Evidence (Scotland) Act 1988.
5. Privilege and immunity
Self incrimination, Professional privilege; public interest immunity; confidentiality; without prejudice letters; witnesses and communications.
6. Competence and compellability of witnesses, character
Parties, accused, spouses, co-accused, children, vulnerable witnesses; persons of diminished physical/mental capacity. Accused persons, witnesses; similar fact evidence; Previous convictions, prior history and character.
7. Recovery and Preservation of Evidence
Improperly obtained evidence, warrants, urgency, searches, covert operations. Ss 13-20A Criminal Procedure (S) Act 1995 - police powers.
8. The Hearsay rule and exceptions
Civil and criminal rules, the Civil Evidence (Scotland) Act 1988, ss 259-262 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995; res gestae and de recenti statements.
9. Opinion + Expert Evidence/Evidence at the Trial or Proof
Expert and Opinion evidence Conduct of inquiry (examination in chief, cross- examination and re- examination), children and vulnerable witnesses.

LAW308 Description

This module deals with the law relating to companies and partnerships.

Aims
To identify and examine the principles of Scots commercial law in relation to partnership and corporate law

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Formulate structured and referenced written responses which evaluate conflicting issues to defined corporate law issues
2. Evaluate partnership, companies and other business vehicles, and critically assess the factors influencing the choice of business organisation;
3. Critically assess the principles of formation, operation and termination of corporate bodies
4. Demonstrate skills of analysis and synthesis applying legal principles to provide solutions to defined problems in the area of partnership and corporate law corporate law

Indicative Content
1. The Law of Partnership
Definition, relationship between partners and between partners and third parties, limited partners, limited liability partnerships.
2. Incorporation
Organisation of business in the UK, registration, promoters, separate legal personality, piercing the veil, minority protection.
3. Company Officers
Directors, role, and duties; auditors, role and duties; company secretary, role and duties.
4. Shares and share capital
Allotment and transfer of shares; maintenance of capital; repurchase and reduction of shares, dividends
5. Unfair prejudice and derivative proceedings
Shareholders’ rights in the face of unfairly prejudicial conduct; shareholders’ rights against directors
6. Insider dealing, meetings
Insider dealing and its prevention; market abuse. Shareholder democracy and decision-making
7. Corporate insolvency
Receiverships, administration orders, liquidation and company voluntary arrangements

LAW300 Description

Law of Property provides an in depth study of the principal concepts of property and particularly in relation to rights and duties to land, in Scots law.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a deep understanding of the fundamental concepts of property law and their application to the creation, transfer and discharge of real rights in Scotland

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Explain the nature of property and the types of ownership rights within the Scottish system of landownership, including incorporeal property such as intellectual property
2. Critically analyse the principles applying to the creation, variation, discharge and extinction of real burdens and servitudes. and understand the law of the tenement
3. Understand the relationship of missives and dispositions and the main clauses therein
4. Define and explain the unique features of the contract of lease and real rights in leases
5. Critically assess the system of land registration in Scotland and the developing agenda in relation to land information systems and searching
6. Demonstrate higher order legal skills and knowledge and apply them by problem solving

Indicative Content
1. The Nature of Property and Ownership
Classifications of property. The nature of property and ownership; real and personal rights. Corporeal and incorporeal rights, such as intellectual property. Acquisition of title; rights in security. Hohfeld and the nature of rights. The feudal system of land ownership and its abolition; real rights in land. Separate tenements in the land; Regalia; water rights; mineral rights. Fixtures.
2. Real burdens and title conditions
Real burdens and servitudes, title and interest to enforce. The Title Conditions (S) Act 2003. Variation, discharge and extinction
3. Law of the Tenement
Common law; Tenements (S) Act
4. Registration of Title
The processes and effects of Land Registration. e- conveyancing. The form of the registers and the purposes and processes of searching. Inhibitions and Land Attachment.
5. Contracts for Sale and purchase of Heritage
Common law requirements and typical clauses found in modern missives and their effects.The Scottish Standard Clauses
6. dispositions and standard securities
The form and content of the disposition and the standard security and the significance and effect of the clauses therein, including implied clauses
7. Leases
Real rights in a lease; constitution of lease, obligations of parties; rent; Termination: irritancy, removing, ejection, recovery of possession. Commercial leases. Statutory tenancies.

Criminology - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Criminology course.

Module 1: CRM205 Criminological Theories I: The Positive Criminal

Module 2: SOC201 Classical Social Theory

Module 3: CRM203 Criminalisation in the 21st Century

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Criminology course.

Module 1: CRM301 Gender and Crime

Module 2: CRM302 Police, Policing and Policework

Module 3: CRM306 Drugs, Addiction and Society OR SOC303 Race, Ethnicity and Immigration

CRM205 Description

This module introduces a range of theoretical approaches that explain crime, deviance and criminal behaviour. The particular focus is on the construction of the positive criminal.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : the ability to develop an understanding and enhance critical awareness of positivistic perspectives on crime and deviance.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Discuss the contribution of criminological and sociological research to our understandings of crime and deviance.
2. Compare and contrast different theoretical explanations of crime, deviance and juvenile delinquency.
3. Critique the positivistic theories of the criminal.

Indicative Content
1. Classical Criminology
Crime as free will. Social Contact, Beccaria and Bentham.
2. Biological Positivism
Explores the work of Lombroso and the Italian School of Criminology and will explore the continued attraction of biological explanations of Criminality.
3. Anomie and Crime
Durkheim, Merton and Anomie.
4. Social Disorganisation theory
Chicago School, particularly the work of Clifford Shaw.
5. Differential Association and Differential Organisation
Sutherlands critique of Social Disorganisation
6. Juvenile Delinquency and Subcultural Explanations of Criminality
Examines both the American and British research on Subcultures and Crime.
7. Matza and the Critique of Positivism

SOC201 Description

This module is intended to introduce the work of three key social theorists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, Karl Marx, Max Weber and Emile Durkheim. Their work is used to critically illustrate the nature of capitalist modernity and the foundations of contemporary sociological theory and practice.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :working knowledge of the principle ideas of the key contributors to the foundations of sociological thought.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical influences upon the key contributors to the foundation of sociological thought.
2. Illustrate an understanding of how each thinker interpreted the impact of modern capitalist society upon the 'human condition'.
3. Articulate an understanding of how each thinker used different methodologies to analyse and explain the nature of social cohesion and social conflict.
4. Display an ability to effectively communicate the similarities and differences between the key classical sociological thinkers.
5. Critically assess the significance of the classical thinkers' social theory in the analysis of contemporary society.

Indicative Content
1. KARL MARX
Capitalism, Workers` Movement and The Communist Manifesto (1848); Dialectics, Fetishism and the Purpose of Critique; Value, Labour, Money; Capital, Surplus Value and Exploitation; Primitive Accumulation, the Logic of Separation and the Question of Crisis; Class Struggle, Revolution and Communism.
2. MAX WEBER
Introduction: contextual overview and biography; The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism; Conception of sociology and methodology; Bureaucratisation and rationalisation; Class, status and party; Political sociology: power, legitimacy and the state.
3. EMILE DURKHEIM
Introduction: contextual overview and biography; The Rules of Sociological Method; Suicide; The Division of Labour in Society; Morality and Religion; Crime, Deviance and the Law.

CRM203 Description

This module will look at ways of interpreting new laws, forms of policing and at new forms of criminalisation.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : the opportunity to understand theories of risk and regulation that attempt to explain how and why certain issues are problematised and made criminal.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify key themes and ideas in the history of crime control.
2. Explain theories of fear and risk.
3. Explain theories regarding crime panics.
4. Identify theories exploring the ‘new elite’ and their growing regulation of everyday life.
5. Explain how the theory of diminished subjectivity relates to new forms of criminalisation including the criminalisation of young people, relationships and language.

Indicative Content
1. Criminalisation
The criminalisation of everything; the development of new laws, forms of surveillance and ways of thinking about crime.
2. Race and class
Moral and amoral panics, past and present, regarding class and race.
3. Tolerance, intolerance and zero tolerance
Changing nature of the elite, of the legal subject and the new criminalising dynamic.
4. Fear, risk and regulation
The importance of policing fear and developing a culture of control.
5. The rise and fall of ‘youth’
Freedom and rebellion; regulation and safety of generation ‘Snowflake’.

CRM301 Description

This module will examine the relationship between gender and crime.

Aims
To explore the ways in which crime is gendered.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the feminist critique of criminology.
2. Understand the relationship between the construction of masculinity and femininity and crime.
3. Explore the relationship between crime and 'doing gender'.

Indicative Content
1. The Feminist Critique of Criminology
The emergence of the feminist critique and the challenge to the feminine 'other'.
2. Women and Crime
The pattern of women's crime. Deviance, femininity and the response to female transgression.
3. Men and Crime
Masculinity and crime, crime as structured action, crime as a resource for doing gender. The situational context and crime.

CRM302 Description

This module introduces students to key issues and debates in the history and development of contemporary policing in the UK.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with Knowledge and understanding of the social and historical development of policing and of the changing values that govern policework.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and recognise different police cultures in their historical and contemporary setting through working collaboratively and individually to understand changing responses to crime.
2. Confidently evaluate changes in policing practices and assess the implications for policework in diverse societies.
3. Recognise and identify new and emergent forms of private and state policing and develop reasoned arguments about the challenges this poses for public policing.
4. Critically examine and enquire about changing values and relationships between individuals, groups, public and private policing agencies and the wider social structure.

Indicative Content
1. The History of the Police
'Policing before the police'; from 'Peelers' to 'crime fighters' to 'risk managers' to 'knowledge workers'; models of policing
2. Policing Structures and Systems
What do policing structures look like? How is the service organised? Hierarchies; police powers, police cultures; policing and the media, myth and reality
3. Police Operations
Analysing and investigating crime; policing styles revisited; crime reduction and/or community safety; responding to terrorism; organised crime
4. Key Debates in Contemporary Policing
Governance; accountability; ethics; performance management; policing 'futures'; surveillance

CRM306 Description

Criminological and sociological perspectives on drug governance and addiction

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a wide-ranging and critical understanding of the governance of drugs and the application of discourses of addiction in framing drug consumption practices.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the historical, political and social determinants of drug consumption and its problematization.
2. Appraise the contribution of different perspectives relevant to the understanding and explanation of addiction.
3. Consider critically the historical and/or contemporary representation of problematic and addictive consumption in culture.
4. Assess a number of key contemporary approaches deployed in the management of drug use and/or addiction.

Indicative Content
1. Historical, political and social contexts of drugs consumption and governance
Historical contexts in the growth of drug consumption and its governance State and criminal justice drugs policy in the UK 12 step and other recovery movements
2. Theorizing addiction
Freedom, compulsion and willpower Neuropharmacology (and its critics) The social construction of addiction Sociological approaches
3. Case studies
Heroin and Opioids Smoking and anti-smoking Alcohol

SOC303 Description

This module will examine the history of race and racism in 19th, 20th and 21st century Britain, from the 'Scramble for Africa' through the postwar/post-colonial period to the present. It will examine the various forces, processes and discourses through which race, ethnicity and the racialised subject have been constructed, shaped and changed. It will also examine theoretical approaches to and debates about race and ethnicity, racism, race relations and anti-racism, and how these have developed in response to both historical developments and social-political activism.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide students with: a critically informed understanding of the history of race and racism in Britain; theories of race, ethnicity, racism and prejudice; and the relationship between theories and concepts of race and ethnicity, power, history and activism.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand and critically engage with the history of race, racism and immigration in 20th century Britain.
2. Understand and critically engage with the history and development of the concepts of race and ethnicity.
3. Understand and critically engage with the relationship between the theorisation and conceptualisation of race and ethnicity, racism and antiracism, power, history and activism.
4. Have knowledge of and critically engage with the diverse sociological (and wider) theories of race, ethnicity, racism and prejudice.
5. Understand and critically engage with theories and concepts of race, racism, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, nationalism, power, inequality, prejudice, difference, representation & identity.
6. Work in both an individual and group setting, and develop critical, collaborative, written and oral presentation skills.

Indicative Content
1. The Concept and Construction of Race and Ethnicity
This section will look at the concept and construction of race and ethnicity, and the production of racial knowledge from the colonial period to the present.
2. Race, Ethnicity and Nation
This section will examine the (re)construction and relationship between race, ethnicity and nation in Britain in light of postwar/ post-colonial immigration and the end of empire.
3. Race, Ethnicity and Identity
This section will examine the the politics, construction and expression of racial and ethnic identities in post-colonial Britain in response to colonialism, migration, discrimination and racism.
4. Race and Class
This section will examine the relationship between race and class as sites of social-political identification, power, inequality, political struggle and analysis, as well as debates over which is the most effective framework for analysis and activism.
5. Race and Gender
This section will examine the relationship between race and gender as sites of social-political identification, power, inequality, political struggle and analysis, as well as debates over which is the most effective framework for analysis and activism.
6. Race, Crime, Civil Unrest and Political Protest
This section will examine the relationship (within analysis and representation) between race, the law, crime, civil unrest and political protest against socioeconomic conditions, policing and state policy.
7. Anti-Racism, Race Relations and Multiculturalism
This section will examine the history and development of anti-racist and race relations discourses, activism, strategies and legislation, how they have attempted to combat forms of racism, discrimination and inequality, and debates surrounding them.
8. Race, Ethnicity and the Politics of Popular Culture
This section will examine popular culture (e.g. music, film or television) in terms of postcolonial cultural politics, multiculturalism, representation, identity and political activism.

Criminology - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Criminology course.

Module 1: CRM103 Criminal Justice Processes

Module 2: CRM204 Criminological Theories II: Crime, Power and Social Change

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Criminology course.

Module 1: SOC305 Researching Society

Module 2: CRM305 Penal Institutions

Module 3: CRM303 The Social Construction of Surveillance and Cybercrime OR CRM307 State, Environment and Crime

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

CRM103 Description

This module will provide students with an introduction to the criminal justice system and processes in Britain. It will examine how the criminal justice system operates, its key agencies and processes, as well as their relationship with the wider institutions, structures and issues in modern society. It will also look consider theories of and debates concerning crime and criminal justice and how these have influenced the history and development of the criminal justice system.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: introductory knowledge and understanding of the criminal justice system, its aims, key agencies and processes and their relationship with the wider society.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand and consider the function and aims of the criminal justice system.
2. Identify and understand the key agencies and processes involved in the criminal justice system.
3. Identify and assess structural and individual responses to the 'problem' of crime and victimisation.
4. Understand and consider the relationship between social power, inequality, crime and the criminal justice system.
5. Have a foundation of knowledge for more specialized criminological studies courses and professional development.
6. Work in both individual and group settings, and develop critical, collaborative, written and oral presentation skills.

Indicative Content
1. The Criminal Justice System
What is criminal justice? is there a criminal justice 'system'? general characteristics, themes and principles; theories and approaches to crime prevention and crime control; crime control models vs 'due process' models; criminal justice in Scotland.
2. Key Agencies
The role, functions and working practices of the main agencies operating within the criminal justice system (e.g. the police, courts, prisons and probation services) and the processes involved from arrest to probation.
4. Social Power, Inequality and Criminal Justice
Youth crime and justice; race and institutional racism; gender and crime; crime and criminalisation.

CRM204 Description

This module addresses the emergence and development of key criminological perspectives of continuing relevance for the understanding of crime and processes of criminalization.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a detailed understanding and effective appreciation of criminological theories that address issues of crime, processes of criminalization and structures of power within the context of wider social, cultural and political change.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse the key features of a criminological theory and illustrate this in relation to a contemporary area of crime, criminality and / or criminal justice.
2. Assess the contribution of criminological perspectives that attempt to contextualize and explain social patterns of crime, deviance and conformity.
3. Assess the contribution of criminological perspectives that emphasize the possession and exercise of power and the consequences of social change in the production of crime and criminalization.
4. Reflect upon the ways in which different criminological perspectives are shaped by the historical, social and political contexts of their development.

Indicative Content
1. Challenging criminological positivism
Labelling perspectives, Marxism and crisis, The New Criminology / Radical Criminology
2. Theorizing and managing crime and criminality
Left realism, Right realism, Control theories, Situational crime prevention
3. Innovation in criminological theory
Feminist criminology, Critical criminology / Green Criminology, Cultural criminology

SOC305 Description

Principles and practice of social science research methods.

Aims
The aims of this module are to equip students with an understanding of the importance of empirical research to the social sciences. It will provide students with the skills and capabilities to identify and use appropriate data collection tools, apply analysis techniques to data generated and reflect upon their meaning, relevance and ethical implications. In acquiring these skills and capabilities, students will be well-placed to engage with and carry out social research.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the principles of statistical analysis and quantitative data collection.
2. Carry out basic statistical tests on quantitative data and identify the appropriate context for their application.
3. Apply qualitative data collection techniques and reflect upon their appropriateness to different research scenarios.
4. Demonstrate the ability to devise and critically apply an inductive coding framework to qualitative data.

Indicative Content
1. Principles of quantitative research
The first part of the module will introduce students to the elements of statistical data, how quantitative data is collected, structured and presented, how inferences and conclusions can be drawn through the application of basic statistical tests and how SPSS software can facilitate the organization and analysis of quantitative data.
2. Qualitative data collection skills
The second part of the module will provide an overview of an array of qualitative data-collection methods, how such techniques are applicable in an array of different ways to different research contexts and how students should reflect upon themselves as active participants in these kinds of research endeavours.
3. Approaches to qualitative data analysis
The latter half of the module also provides opportunities for students to engage in the analysis of data produced using qualitative data collection techniques. The main emphasis here will be on thematic coding and how qualitative researchers use sociological knowledge to inductive derive systematic meaning from the data they generate. This part of the module will also introduce students to the use of NVivo computer software in qualitative data analysis.
4. Research ethics and ethical issues
The module also examines research ethics and ethical issues in terms of research subject matter, the application of data collection methods, how research can impact in different ways upon research participants and wider society, as well as the formal ethical guidelines and requirements that govern sociological research.

CRM305 Description

This module provides knowledge and understanding of the prison system, the experience of imprisonment and penal policy and practice in the UK.

Aims
To provide the student with the opportunity to explore developments in penal policy and practice, the lived experience of imprisonment and considers alternatives to imprisonment.It will also consider some of the issues surrounding detention and incarceration for foreign nationals.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Collaborate with other students in discussion and presentation to critically assess and evaluate penal policy in modern British society.
2. Critically assess the effect of imprisonment as a form of punishment on prisoners and their families through detailed enquiry based learning on the challenges that confront them.
3. Identify and assess the effectiveness of alternatives to custody through confidently using and evaluating statistical evidence on alternative disposals.
4. Critically examine the complex nature of attitudes to imprisonment and challenge thinking on penal abolition and punitive discourses.
5. Critically examine the growing concerns relating to the detention of foreign nationals in the UK

Indicative Content
1. Contemporary developments in Penal Theory, Policy & Practice
Penal institutions in contemporary society.The crises of legitimacy in penal institutions. Reorganisation and reform. Privatisation of the prison system.
2. Prison Life The Reality
'Doing time' the actuality of prison life, the 'total institution'? Strategies for survival, regime activities, 'banged up' prisoners, prison staff and civilian staff. Dealing with social exclusion. The diversity of the prison population. Stratification and power within prisons.
3. Alternatives to Imprisonment The Way Forward?
Reducing risk or protecting the public? Reducing fear of crime? Human or humane containment and warehousing. Therapeutic prisons. Electronic tagging, community service orders, mediation/reparation.
4. Attitudes to imprisonment
Why do we have prisons? Why are they at the centre of penal policy? Are they culturally 'acceptable'? Abolitionism.
5. Foreign Nationals
detention centres; foreign national prisoners and race relations in prisons; are immigration detention centres new types of penal establishments; critical issues surrounding foreign national prisoners in the UK

CRM303 Description

Using a perspective that sees technologies as socially constructed this module introduces students to the study of surveillance and cybercrime. It offers an analysis of the ways in which surveillance, cybercrime and cybersecurity can be seen as socio- technical assemblages.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: a critical understanding of surveillance and cybercrime in the contemporary world and their effect on the lives of individuals and groups. The module uses a perspective that sees technologies as socially constructed. With this perspective and relevant case studies presented in lectures and readings, students will be encouraged to reflexively challenge the boundaries of technology and society, applying confident and creative thinking to academic and industry debates.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of the social construction of technologies.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of the ways in which surveillance concepts are tied with surveillance technologies.
3. Critically explore and understand how the internet and digital technologies change how we conceptualise crime and security.
4. Critically understand the interdisciplinary nature of the phenomena of cybercrime and surveillance.

Indicative Content
1. Concepts on the Social Study of Technology
such as (a) Social Construction of Technology (b) Technological Determinism (c) Actor-Network Theory.
2. Case Studies in Surveillance
such as (a) Automation of surveillance (b) Algorithmic Surveillance (c) Dataveillance.
3. Case Studies in Cybercrime and Security
such as: (a) malware software (b) security policies and mechanisms (c) Encryption (d) the Dark Web (e) manipulation of trust and reputation.

CRM307 Description

This Module is based on critically engaging with crimes and harm against the natural environment, generally referred to as ‘green crime’. It does so by focusing on competing theoretical tools that aim to discern issues pertinent to green crime and environmental harm. Theoretical propositions discussed will include: environmental risk, environmental rights and ecological justice, while in doing so the issues like climate change, land reform, and wildlife conservation, will be analyzed. Where appropriate case studies local to Scotland will be used in analytically engaging with these issues.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an overview of the emerging, increasingly important and often competing criminological and sociological perspectives and frameworks regarding the issue of crimes and harms against the environment. It does so by discerning the ‘offence’ (what crimes and harms are inflicted on the environment, why and how); the ‘offenders’ (who commits the crime against the environment, and why); and, the ‘victims’ (who suffers as a result of environmental damage, and how).

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically outline and discuss the range of criminological and sociological perspectives on environmental hurt and crime.
2. Understand why green crime is as important as other more traditional forms of crime.
3. Understand the linkages between green crime and traditional forms of crime.

Indicative Content
1. Contextualizing green criminology
Here we will introduce the module and discuss traditional theoretical tools as regards Sociology and Criminology and their development as theoretical frameworks in understanding environmental crime and harm.
2. The risk society, the precariat and green harm crime
This lecture talks to the rise of the risk society and in association with this the idea of the precariat as a vulnerable class of global peoples.
3. Animal rights, species justice and animism
During this lecture, we discuss the rise of the ‘environmental paradigm’ as an all-embracing theoretical concept in helping us understand environmental harm and crime. Using the theoretical idea the ‘new-materialism’, non-human agency as regards animal rights and species justice will be explained in relation to contemporary environmental degradation
4. Ecological victims: confronting the effect of crimes and harms against the environment
This lecture looks at the developing concept of ‘green victimology’. Using concepts like poverty, class and gender, it will look at those affected by environmental crime and other environmentally damaging activities, and begin to outline the role of criminal justice in ameliorating these problems
5. The regulation of environmental harm: Environmental crime and governance
This lecture explores the extent to which law and governance contribute to the protection of the environment. In doing so the interlinked concepts of environmental governance and environmental law will be discussed and terms such as deliberative democracy will be introduced
6. Environmental citizenship and ecological justice as a green panacea
7. Wildlife crime and field sports: The case of wildlife hunting
This lecture looks at the case of wildlife crime in Scotland, exploring the management of parts of Scotland as grouse moors and the issue of stalking.
8. Land-Reform and environmental rights
This lecture looks at the topical issues of land-reform in Scotland and its embodiment of land rights in relation to environmental justice, as regards Scottish legislation.
9. Resource depletion, oil peak and the circular economy
In this lecture, we look at the harms caused by our continuing exploitation of oil, gas and other natural resources into the twenty-first century. And we will explore the idea of the circular economy in Scotland, as a policy aimed at addressing the environmental harms caused by resource exploitation.
10. Policing the environment: NGOs and environmental enforcers
Here the concept of the ‘green movement’ will be discussed and its role, especially that of NGOs, in regulating environmental crime and harm will be examined. In doing so, theoretical concepts such as ‘Regulation theory’, will be introduced.

Sociology - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Sociology course.

Module 1: SOC203 Digital Sociology

Module 2: SOC201 Classical Social Theory

Module 3: CRM205 Criminological Theories I: The Positive Criminal OR PSY205 Cognitive and Social Perspectives on Psychology

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Sociology course.

Module 1: SOC301 Contemporary Social Theory

Module 2: SOC303 Race, Ethnicity and Immigration

Module 3: CRM306 Drugs, Addiction and Society OR SOC304 Propaganda, PR and Misinformation

SOC203 Description

This module considers the way in which people's lives are inter-twined with the `digital revolution from a sociological perspective.

Aims
The aim of this Module is to provide the student with:(i) an introduction to a sociological analysis of digital life; (ii) an understanding of the impact of digital life on various everyday practices; (iii) an understanding of the above in relation to identities within digital society.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between digital technologies and everyday practices and routines.
2. Assess the sociological significance of various digital involvements in relation to identity.
3. Explain the significance and impact of digital systems on social systems such as trust.

Indicative Content
1. Everyday Digital Life
This aspect of the module focuses on the sociological significance of the incorporation of digital technology within everyday practices. Examples of such practices include: shopping and consumption, education, and games and entertainment.
2. The Digital Self
This aspect of the module considers the use and impact of digital technology on the ways in which online identities are fashioned, primarily through the use of social media.
3. Contemporary Issues
This aspect of the module considers controversial and/or contemporary issues such as: the (ab)use of 'big data', bots and the Turing Test, higher education and the 'University of Google', trust and reputation online, data-mapped selves.

SOC201 Description

This module is intended to introduce the work of three key social theorists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, Karl Marx, Max Weber and Emile Durkheim. Their work is used to critically illustrate the nature of capitalist modernity and the foundations of contemporary sociological theory and practice.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :working knowledge of the principle ideas of the key contributors to the foundations of sociological thought.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical influences upon the key contributors to the foundation of sociological thought.
2. Illustrate an understanding of how each thinker interpreted the impact of modern capitalist society upon the 'human condition'.
3. Articulate an understanding of how each thinker used different methodologies to analyse and explain the nature of social cohesion and social conflict.
4. Display an ability to effectively communicate the similarities and differences between the key classical sociological thinkers.
5. Critically assess the significance of the classical thinkers' social theory in the analysis of contemporary society.

Indicative Content
1. KARL MARX
Capitalism, Workers` Movement and The Communist Manifesto (1848); Dialectics, Fetishism and the Purpose of Critique; Value, Labour, Money; Capital, Surplus Value and Exploitation; Primitive Accumulation, the Logic of Separation and the Question of Crisis; Class Struggle, Revolution and Communism.
2. MAX WEBER
Introduction: contextual overview and biography; The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism; Conception of sociology and methodology; Bureaucratisation and rationalisation; Class, status and party; Political sociology: power, legitimacy and the state.
3. EMILE DURKHEIM
Introduction: contextual overview and biography; The Rules of Sociological Method; Suicide; The Division of Labour in Society; Morality and Religion; Crime, Deviance and the Law.

CRM205 Description

This module introduces a range of theoretical approaches that explain crime, deviance and criminal behaviour. The particular focus is on the construction of the positive criminal.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : the ability to develop an understanding and enhance critical awareness of positivistic perspectives on crime and deviance.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Discuss the contribution of criminological and sociological research to our understandings of crime and deviance.
2. Compare and contrast different theoretical explanations of crime, deviance and juvenile delinquency.
3. Critique the positivistic theories of the criminal.

Indicative Content
1. Classical Criminology
Crime as free will. Social Contact, Beccaria and Bentham.
2. Biological Positivism
Explores the work of Lombroso and the Italian School of Criminology and will explore the continued attraction of biological explanations of Criminality.
3. Anomie and Crime
Durkheim, Merton and Anomie.
4. Social Disorganisation theory
Chicago School, particularly the work of Clifford Shaw.
5. Differential Association and Differential Organisation
Sutherlands critique of Social Disorganisation
6. Juvenile Delinquency and Subcultural Explanations of Criminality
Examines both the American and British research on Subcultures and Crime.
7. Matza and the Critique of Positivism

PSY205 Description

This module will introduce the cognitive and social aspects of the BPS core curriculum. Cognitive psychology encompasses much of what are considered ‘mental processes’. These processes range from relatively low-level processes of perception to higher level things like memory and decision making. Social psychology is the study of how we process information about others, and the biases that influence this processing. The module will combine conventional lectures on both cognitive and social psychology, supported by practical classes exposing students to experiments as participants.

Aims
The module aims to provide students with a critical and comprehensive understanding of the major topics, empirical research and theoretical approaches in cognitive and social psychology. The student will learn about how cognitive and social psychology work as sciences, and will participate in experiments to deepen their understanding.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand conceptual and historical issues in cognitive and social psychology, the origins and philosophical underpinnings.
2. Convey the major features of cognitive and social psychological processes.
3. Understand the key models and research findings in cognition and social psychology.
4. Evaluate psychological research findings.

Indicative Content
1. Conceptual and historical perspectives in cognition
Origins of research in cognition, and cognitive neuropsychology. Understanding how cognitive processes operate in different brain areas.
2. Neural architectures
Neurones, receptive fields and vision. How does the brain connect the world outside with our thoughts and experiences?
3. Conceptual and historical issues in social psychology
Defining social cognition and social behaviour. Understanding classic and contemporary approaches, and the social processing biases they reveal.
4. Pro- and anti-social behaviour
Exploring the influence of social learning on aggression and the social factors that influence helping behaviour.
5. Attitudes and social influences
Understanding attitudes and the attitude-behaviour link, routes to attitude change. Conformity and obedience.
6. Decision making and problem solving
Exploring the impact of social identity on perception and behaviour. Stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination.
7. Perception and recognition
The recognition of objects and faces.
8. Attention
Is cognition a limited resource to be allocated carefully or do we attend to everything?
9. Learning and memory
What circumstances determine how we learn new information? How is this information stored in our brains and how do we access this information while reasoning?
10. Decision making and problem solving
How do we choose responses, how do we solve problems?

SOC301 Description

This is a social theory module. It is not a history or biography of great thinkers. It encourages students to read closely the arguments of leading schools of social theory and develop their analytical capacities by discussing and further elaborating some of the main developments in social thought over the past half century or so.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :evaluative skills by making explicit the evidential and analytical grounds for contemporary social theory.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand theoretical debates on key sociological concepts.
2. Evaluate competing theories and different schools of social thought.
3. Relate theory to specific themes of Civilizing Process, Critical Theory, Power, Cultural Capital and Postmodernism.

Indicative Content
1. Norbert Elias and the Civilizing Process
The Civilizing Process in Context; The State and the De-Civilizing Process.
2. The Frankfurt School and Critical Theory
Traditional and Critical Theory; Walter Benjamin: `Theses on the Philosophy of History'.
3. Relational Sociology of Pierre Bourdieu
`The Real is Relational': Habitus, Doxa, Field and Capital; Bourdieu and the Field of Culture;
4. Foucault
History, Power, Knowledge; Discipline and Punish.
5. Postmodernism
Postmodernism & Postmodernity; Habermas: Rejecting Postmodernism and Reconstructing Modernity.

 

SOC303 Description

This module will examine the history of race and racism in 19th, 20th and 21st century Britain, from the 'Scramble for Africa' through the postwar/post-colonial period to the present. It will examine the various forces, processes and discourses through which race, ethnicity and the racialised subject have been constructed, shaped and changed. It will also examine theoretical approaches to and debates about race and ethnicity, racism, race relations and anti-racism, and how these have developed in response to both historical developments and social-political activism.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide students with: a critically informed understanding of the history of race and racism in Britain; theories of race, ethnicity, racism and prejudice; and the relationship between theories and concepts of race and ethnicity, power, history and activism.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand and critically engage with the history of race, racism and immigration in 20th century Britain.
2. Understand and critically engage with the history and development of the concepts of race and ethnicity.
3. Understand and critically engage with the relationship between the theorisation and conceptualisation of race and ethnicity, racism and antiracism, power, history and activism.
4. Have knowledge of and critically engage with the diverse sociological (and wider) theories of race, ethnicity, racism and prejudice.
5. Understand and critically engage with theories and concepts of race, racism, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, nationalism, power, inequality, prejudice, difference, representation & identity.
6. Work in both an individual and group setting, and develop critical, collaborative, written and oral presentation skills.

Indicative Content
1. The Concept and Construction of Race and Ethnicity
This section will look at the concept and construction of race and ethnicity, and the production of racial knowledge from the colonial period to the present.
2. Race, Ethnicity and Nation
This section will examine the (re)construction and relationship between race, ethnicity and nation in Britain in light of postwar/ post-colonial immigration and the end of empire.
3. Race, Ethnicity and Identity
This section will examine the the politics, construction and expression of racial and ethnic identities in post-colonial Britain in response to colonialism, migration, discrimination and racism.
4. Race and Class
This section will examine the relationship between race and class as sites of social-political identification, power, inequality, political struggle and analysis, as well as debates over which is the most effective framework for analysis and activism.
5. Race and Gender
This section will examine the relationship between race and gender as sites of social-political identification, power, inequality, political struggle and analysis, as well as debates over which is the most effective framework for analysis and activism.
6. Race, Crime, Civil Unrest and Political Protest
This section will examine the relationship (within analysis and representation) between race, the law, crime, civil unrest and political protest against socioeconomic conditions, policing and state policy.
7. Anti-Racism, Race Relations and Multiculturalism
This section will examine the history and development of anti-racist and race relations discourses, activism, strategies and legislation, how they have attempted to combat forms of racism, discrimination and inequality, and debates surrounding them.
8. Race, Ethnicity and the Politics of Popular Culture
This section will examine popular culture (e.g. music, film or television) in terms of postcolonial cultural politics, multiculturalism, representation, identity and political activism.

 

CRM306 Description

Criminological and sociological perspectives on drug governance and addiction

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a wide-ranging and critical understanding of the governance of drugs and the application of discourses of addiction in framing drug consumption practices.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the historical, political and social determinants of drug consumption and its problematization.
2. Appraise the contribution of different perspectives relevant to the understanding and explanation of addiction.
3. Consider critically the historical and/or contemporary representation of problematic and addictive consumption in culture.
4. Assess a number of key contemporary approaches deployed in the management of drug use and/or addiction.

Indicative Content
1. Historical, political and social contexts of drugs consumption and governance
Historical contexts in the growth of drug consumption and its governance State and criminal justice drugs policy in the UK 12 step and other recovery movements
2. Theorizing addiction
Freedom, compulsion and willpower Neuropharmacology (and its critics) The social construction of addiction Sociological approaches
3. Case studies
Heroin and Opioids Smoking and anti-smoking Alcohol

SOC304 Description

This module examines the processes of framing and production of the mass mediation of propaganda.

Aims
Analyse the propaganda text as socio-cultural narratives rooted in the political histories of nation states. Give critical reflection to propaganda effects on target populations, audiences and consumers.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand and critique the processes of production, representation and reception of propaganda forms.
2. Critically analyse and reflect on the propaganda text as narrative tropes bound in social, cultural and political histories.
3. Understand and critically evaluate the relationships between propaganda and its mediation, mediation and audiences, and propaganda, media and corporate and state power.
4. Critically evaluate the role of the media in targeting the individual as a source of (ir)rational action.

Indicative Content
1. The Historical Emergence of Modern Propaganda Forms
The historical development of propaganda forms, rhetorics, tropes and ideology.
2. The Analysis of Propaganda
Frameworks and models for analysing and researching propaganda including textual analysis, semiotics, historical archaeology.
3. Propaganda and Mass Media
Mass media as means of the organisation, production and circulation of propaganda, focussing on the propaganda techniques of the Third Reich.
4. Propaganda, Narrative and Myth
Structural analysis of narrative and myth/ideological systems and their representation as propaganda.

Sociology - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Sociology course.

Module 1: SOC204 Crime, Media and the State

Module 2: CRM204 Criminological Theories II: Crime, Power and Social Change OR PSY206 Essential Research Methods and Analysis for Psychology

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Sociology course.

Module 1: SOC305 Researching Society

Module 2: SOC302 Sociology of Gender and Sexuality

Module 3: CRM303 The Social Construction of Surveillance and Cybercrime OR SOC306 Sociology of Scotland

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

SOC204 Description

This module will look at media discourses of criminal activity and the state.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to develop an understanding of relationships between states and criminal activity, and the complex media centred discourses emerging from these. In so doing it will provide students with an interpretive framework for analysing historical and contemporary discourses of state criminal activity.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and evaluate key theories and examples associated with state criminal activity.
2. Identify and evaluate key theories and examples associated with the state and political violence.
3. Identify and evaluate key theories and examples associated with role of the media and state criminal activity.

Indicative Content
1. Crimes of the Powerful
The state as criminal actor
2. Media, Crime and Power
3. Investigative Journalism, Corruption and the Political Process
4. State Corporate Corruption
5. The Nation State and Violence
6. Terrorism and Counter Terrorism in the Global War on Terror
7. Crimes Against Humanity
8. Transnational Organized Crime
9. The Geopolitical War on Drugs
10. Discourses from Below – Urban Legends, Conspiracy theories and other Stigmatized Knowledge

CRM204 Description

This module addresses the emergence and development of key criminological perspectives of continuing relevance for the understanding of crime and processes of criminalization.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a detailed understanding and effective appreciation of criminological theories that address issues of crime, processes of criminalization and structures of power within the context of wider social, cultural and political change.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse the key features of a criminological theory and illustrate this in relation to a contemporary area of crime, criminality and / or criminal justice.
2. Assess the contribution of criminological perspectives that attempt to contextualize and explain social patterns of crime, deviance and conformity.
3. Assess the contribution of criminological perspectives that emphasize the possession and exercise of power and the consequences of social change in the production of crime and criminalization.
4. Reflect upon the ways in which different criminological perspectives are shaped by the historical, social and political contexts of their development.

Indicative Content
1. Challenging criminological positivism
Labelling perspectives, Marxism and crisis, The New Criminology / Radical Criminology
2. Theorizing and managing crime and criminality
Left realism, Right realism, Control theories, Situational crime prevention
3. Innovation in criminological theory
Feminist criminology, Critical criminology / Green Criminology, Cultural criminology

PSY206 Description

To build on research methods knowledge and prepare student for third year Core Research Methods

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to further develop the knowledge and skills required to design, conduct, analyse and report quantitative and qualitative psychological research in APA format

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Report, design and conduct ethically acceptable psychological research using techniques taught on the module.
2. Report, evaluate psychological research and present this in APA format.
3. Use SPSS to analyse empirical data utilising a variety of statistical techniques.
4. Identify and locate, using a variety of resources, suitable reference material for practical work.
5. Demonstrate, via assessment a good understanding of the key principles of psychological research design and data interpretation

Indicative Content
1. Methods of Research
Main quantitative and qualitative research methods available to psychologists; Use in applied settings; advantages and disadvantages
2. The Experimental Method
Variables and levels; hypotheses; design - basic and advanced; control techniques; validity and reliability in experimentation; ethics in experimentation
3. Data Analysis - Descriptive Statistics
Data types; measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; normal distribution; graphing data; confidence intervals.
4. Data Analysis - Inferential Statistics
Test selection; parametric and nonparametric 2-sample test of difference; Within and Between one-way ANOVA and Non-parametric ANOVA, effect size; power; correlation; Tests of both internal and external reliability; inter rater reliability
5. Qualitative Methods
Types of qualitative research techniques; questionnaire design, interviewing - types, advantages, disadvantages; analysing interview material.
6. Quantitative Methods
Experimental method, two variable tests of difference (parametric and non-parametric), tests of relationships (parametric and non-parametric); multilevel testing (parametric and non-parametric), follow up testing (parametric and non-parametric). Reliability analysis using Cronbach's alpha, quantitative content analysis, item analysis
7. Ethics
Creating and conducting ethical research based on BPS Ethical Guidelines
8. Reporting Research
Sections and content of an APA formatted psychology lab report; APA referencing
9. Information Searching
Structured and unstructured search; Search using the Internet and locating electronic journals using the university library system and appropriate data bases
10. I.T.Skills
Designing a lab report template using Word for Windows; using SPSS for data analysis.

SOC305 Description

Principles and practice of social science research methods.

Aims
The aims of this module are to equip students with an understanding of the importance of empirical research to the social sciences. It will provide students with the skills and capabilities to identify and use appropriate data collection tools, apply analysis techniques to data generated and reflect upon their meaning, relevance and ethical implications. In acquiring these skills and capabilities, students will be well-placed to engage with and carry out social research.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the principles of statistical analysis and quantitative data collection.
2. Carry out basic statistical tests on quantitative data and identify the appropriate context for their application.
3. Apply qualitative data collection techniques and reflect upon their appropriateness to different research scenarios.
4. Demonstrate the ability to devise and critically apply an inductive coding framework to qualitative data.

Indicative Content
1. Principles of quantitative research
The first part of the module will introduce students to the elements of statistical data, how quantitative data is collected, structured and presented, how inferences and conclusions can be drawn through the application of basic statistical tests and how SPSS software can facilitate the organization and analysis of quantitative data.
2. Qualitative data collection skills
The second part of the module will provide an overview of an array of qualitative data-collection methods, how such techniques are applicable in an array of different ways to different research contexts and how students should reflect upon themselves as active participants in these kinds of research endeavours.
3. Approaches to qualitative data analysis
The latter half of the module also provides opportunities for students to engage in the analysis of data produced using qualitative data collection techniques. The main emphasis here will be on thematic coding and how qualitative researchers use sociological knowledge to inductive derive systematic meaning from the data they generate. This part of the module will also introduce students to the use of NVivo computer software in qualitative data analysis.
4. Research ethics and ethical issues
The module also examines research ethics and ethical issues in terms of research subject matter, the application of data collection methods, how research can impact in different ways upon research participants and wider society, as well as the formal ethical guidelines and requirements that govern sociological research.

SOC302 Description

To provide students with a sociological understanding of gender and gender relations.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of: 1.The social construction of gender and sexuality. 2. The relationship between gender and sexuality. 3. The way in which unequal social relations are produced and reproduced through gender and sexual identity.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which gender and sexual identity is socially produced.
2. Evaluate the ways in which we, as gendered subjects, 'do' gender and sexuality.
3. Some understanding of the ways in which gender relations are reproduced across a range of social actions and practices.
4. A critical understanding of the making of modern gender and sexuality.

Indicative Content
1. History of Gender and Sexuality
Traces the development of the making of modern gender and sexuality
2. The Social Construction of Gender and Sexuality
Critique of gender and sexuality essentialism, the construction of modern gender relations and categories of sexuality.
3. Masculinity
Hegemonic masculinity, the universal man and the masculine other.
5. Gender and Sexuality in the modern World
Gender and Sexuality in the modern World

CRM303 Description

Using a perspective that sees technologies as socially constructed this module introduces students to the study of surveillance and cybercrime. It offers an analysis of the ways in which surveillance, cybercrime and cybersecurity can be seen as socio- technical assemblages.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: a critical understanding of surveillance and cybercrime in the contemporary world and their effect on the lives of individuals and groups. The module uses a perspective that sees technologies as socially constructed. With this perspective and relevant case studies presented in lectures and readings, students will be encouraged to reflexively challenge the boundaries of technology and society, applying confident and creative thinking to academic and industry debates.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of the social construction of technologies.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of the ways in which surveillance concepts are tied with surveillance technologies.
3. Critically explore and understand how the internet and digital technologies change how we conceptualise crime and security.
4. Critically understand the interdisciplinary nature of the phenomena of cybercrime and surveillance.

Indicative Content
1. Concepts on the Social Study of Technology
such as (a) Social Construction of Technology (b) Technological Determinism (c) Actor-Network Theory.
2. Case Studies in Surveillance
such as (a) Automation of surveillance (b) Algorithmic Surveillance (c) Dataveillance.
3. Case Studies in Cybercrime and Security
such as: (a) malware software (b) security policies and mechanisms (c) Encryption (d) the Dark Web (e) manipulation of trust and reputation.

SOC306 Description

Like all other nations, Scotland is seen as possessing a distinctive culture and civil society but unlike others, it has not had state apparatus to serve this culture and civics. This module explores this contradiction while at the same time, analytically engages with current attempts to deal with it - the development of Devolution. current

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :a critical understanding of the social, political, historical issues that have given rise to current debates on change in Scottish Society.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Situate the historical development of the national identity in Scotland in its political and cultural context;
2. Assess competing explanations of nationhood and national identity;
3. Understand theoretical argument as they relate to political change in Scotland, and assess their veracity in explaining this change;
4. Understand the significance of culture and associated symbols in Scotland; the play of church, law and education;
5. Reflect on their position in relation to political change in Scotland; and,
6. Take an active role if future developments as citizens.

Indicative Content
1. Nationalism and National Identity in Scotland
Current theoretical developments in relation to understanding nationalism and their play in helping understand political change in Scotland.
2. Scotland as Icon
3. Egalitarianism and the Civic Tradition
4. Modernity and Industrialisation: Scotland of the 20th C.
5. The Politics of National Identity
6. Tourism and Heritage
7. Class in Scotland
8. Is there Room for Britishness
9. Scotland in the Media
10. Self-Reflective Practice

Social Science - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Social Science course.

Module 1: SOC201 Classical Social Theory

For modules 2 & 3, choose two of the following:

CRM205 Criminological Theories I: The Positive Criminal 

PSY205 Cognitive and Social Perspectives on Psychology

SPS207 Placement and skill development when working with children in a physical activity context

MKT202 Digital and Social Media Marketing

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Social Science course.

Module 1: SOC301 Contemporary Social Theory

For modules 2 & 3, choose two of the following:

PSY307 Psychology in the Real World

SPS313 Social Issues in Sport and Exercise

BMT301 Operations and Supply Chain Management

CRM301 Gender and Crime

SOC201 Description

This module is intended to introduce the work of three key social theorists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, Karl Marx, Max Weber and Emile Durkheim. Their work is used to critically illustrate the nature of capitalist modernity and the foundations of contemporary sociological theory and practice.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :working knowledge of the principle ideas of the key contributors to the foundations of sociological thought.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical influences upon the key contributors to the foundation of sociological thought.
2. Illustrate an understanding of how each thinker interpreted the impact of modern capitalist society upon the 'human condition'.
3. Articulate an understanding of how each thinker used different methodologies to analyse and explain the nature of social cohesion and social conflict.
4. Display an ability to effectively communicate the similarities and differences between the key classical sociological thinkers.
5. Critically assess the significance of the classical thinkers' social theory in the analysis of contemporary society.

Indicative Content
1. KARL MARX
Capitalism, Workers` Movement and The Communist Manifesto (1848); Dialectics, Fetishism and the Purpose of Critique; Value, Labour, Money; Capital, Surplus Value and Exploitation; Primitive Accumulation, the Logic of Separation and the Question of Crisis; Class Struggle, Revolution and Communism.
2. MAX WEBER
Introduction: contextual overview and biography; The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism; Conception of sociology and methodology; Bureaucratisation and rationalisation; Class, status and party; Political sociology: power, legitimacy and the state.
3. EMILE DURKHEIM
Introduction: contextual overview and biography; The Rules of Sociological Method; Suicide; The Division of Labour in Society; Morality and Religion; Crime, Deviance and the Law.

CRM205 Description

This module introduces a range of theoretical approaches that explain crime, deviance and criminal behaviour. The particular focus is on the construction of the positive criminal.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : the ability to develop an understanding and enhance critical awareness of positivistic perspectives on crime and deviance.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Discuss the contribution of criminological and sociological research to our understandings of crime and deviance.
2. Compare and contrast different theoretical explanations of crime, deviance and juvenile delinquency.
3. Critique the positivistic theories of the criminal.

Indicative Content
1. Classical Criminology
Crime as free will. Social Contact, Beccaria and Bentham.
2. Biological Positivism
Explores the work of Lombroso and the Italian School of Criminology and will explore the continued attraction of biological explanations of Criminality.
3. Anomie and Crime
Durkheim, Merton and Anomie.
4. Social Disorganisation theory
Chicago School, particularly the work of Clifford Shaw.
5. Differential Association and Differential Organisation
Sutherlands critique of Social Disorganisation
6. Juvenile Delinquency and Subcultural Explanations of Criminality
Examines both the American and British research on Subcultures and Crime.
7. Matza and the Critique of Positivism

PSY205 Description

This module will introduce the cognitive and social aspects of the BPS core curriculum. Cognitive psychology encompasses much of what are considered ‘mental processes’. These processes range from relatively low-level processes of perception to higher level things like memory and decision making. Social psychology is the study of how we process information about others, and the biases that influence this processing. The module will combine conventional lectures on both cognitive and social psychology, supported by practical classes exposing students to experiments as participants.

Aims
The module aims to provide students with a critical and comprehensive understanding of the major topics, empirical research and theoretical approaches in cognitive and social psychology. The student will learn about how cognitive and social psychology work as sciences, and will participate in experiments to deepen their understanding.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand conceptual and historical issues in cognitive and social psychology, the origins and philosophical underpinnings.
2. Convey the major features of cognitive and social psychological processes.
3. Understand the key models and research findings in cognition and social psychology.
4. Evaluate psychological research findings.

Indicative Content
1. Conceptual and historical perspectives in cognition
Origins of research in cognition, and cognitive neuropsychology. Understanding how cognitive processes operate in different brain areas.
2. Neural architectures
Neurones, receptive fields and vision. How does the brain connect the world outside with our thoughts and experiences?
3. Conceptual and historical issues in social psychology
Defining social cognition and social behaviour. Understanding classic and contemporary approaches, and the social processing biases they reveal.
4. Pro- and anti-social behaviour
Exploring the influence of social learning on aggression and the social factors that influence helping behaviour.
5. Attitudes and social influences
Understanding attitudes and the attitude-behaviour link, routes to attitude change. Conformity and obedience.
6. Decision making and problem solving
Exploring the impact of social identity on perception and behaviour. Stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination.
7. Perception and recognition
The recognition of objects and faces.
8. Attention
Is cognition a limited resource to be allocated carefully or do we attend to everything?
9. Learning and memory
What circumstances determine how we learn new information? How is this information stored in our brains and how do we access this information while reasoning?
10. Decision making and problem solving
How do we choose responses, how do we solve problems?

SPS207 Description

This module will give students the opportunity to lead, develop and/or support the delivery of physical activity sessions to school pupils in Dundee. Students will also have an opportunity to engage with a range of employers from the Sport and Fitness industry to gain insight into the requirements of particular roles. These experiences should enable the student to develop a career plan for future employment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : an opportunity to apply and/or understand the application of theory in real world practice settings and to reflect on and articulate the development of their leadership, communication, organisation and management skills. The module will provide the student with opportunities to make a more informed choice about their future degree pathway, to determine career goals and to plan their progress toward achieving these goals

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Reflect on their leadership, communication, organisation and management skills; identify areas for development, and opportunities by which to do this.
2. Deliver and/or support activity sessions for children in the community and articulate how this activity is contributing to their future career aspirations.
3. Articulate their skills, strengths, experiences and achievements to a prospective employer.
4. Understand the demands associated with different professions within the sport and fitness industry.
5. Reflect on these demands in evaluating personal learning and development in the context of career planning.

Indicative Content
1. Planning and delivering activity sessions
Session planning; managing time/resources/people; working within a team; Active Schools/Positive Coaching Scotland training; managing challenging behaviour; developing diversity competence; Growth Mindset; contemporary issues in the sport and fitness industry.
2. Personal Development Planning (PDP)
Completing SWOT analyses; personal objective/goal setting; action planning; electronic PDPs.
3. Reflective practice
Application of models of reflective practice; guided reflection to highlight learning; making theory− practice links; career planning.
4. Articulating skill development
Using electronic platforms and oral media to promote knowledge and skills to external audiences in the context of employability; careers/external speaker workshops.

MKT202 Description

Introducing the role and importance of digital and social media marketing in today's businesses and marketing strategies.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : An understanding of how web-sites, social media and businesses digital footprint impact on marketing and marketing strategies.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate web, digital and social media presence individually and collectively in terms of their appropriateness to marketing efforts.
2. Develop digital marketing solutions for specified marketing problems.

Indicative Content
1. The nature of digital marketing
Traditional marketing, internet marketing, e-marketing, e-commerce, digital marketing: definitions and differences, the concept of conversion marketing, legal and ethical issues in digital marketing.
2. Understanding organisations and their web-sites
The concept of Business Models, application of these concepts to web-sites, digital marketing and social media, designing the customer interface and their use in the specification and evaluation of digital and social media.
3. Integrating a digital footprint into marketing strategy
Understanding and measuring the impact of 'digital' on marketing strategy, researching and profiling the online and digitally aware and active customer, information-processing, online buying, socially engaged customers.
4. Building customer traffic in the digital world
Comparing the effectiveness of online and offline campaigns and understanding digital methods of building traffic: interactive advertising, sponsorship and tenancies, search marketing, analytics, link-building, blogs and social networks, viral marketing.

SOC301 Description

This is a social theory module. It is not a history or biography of great thinkers. It encourages students to read closely the arguments of leading schools of social theory and develop their analytical capacities by discussing and further elaborating some of the main developments in social thought over the past half century or so.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :evaluative skills by making explicit the evidential and analytical grounds for contemporary social theory.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand theoretical debates on key sociological concepts.
2. Evaluate competing theories and different schools of social thought.
3. Relate theory to specific themes of Civilizing Process, Critical Theory, Power, Cultural Capital and Postmodernism.

Indicative Content
1. Norbert Elias and the Civilizing Process
The Civilizing Process in Context; The State and the De-Civilizing Process.
2. The Frankfurt School and Critical Theory
Traditional and Critical Theory; Walter Benjamin: `Theses on the Philosophy of History'.
3. Relational Sociology of Pierre Bourdieu
`The Real is Relational': Habitus, Doxa, Field and Capital; Bourdieu and the Field of Culture;
4. Foucault
History, Power, Knowledge; Discipline and Punish.
5. Postmodernism
Postmodernism & Postmodernity; Habermas: Rejecting Postmodernism and Reconstructing Modernity.

PSY307 Description

This is a student led module where students and Module Leader collaborate in the module and assessment content, marking criteria and module feedback. The area of study is psychological research related to 'real life' situations showing how psychology can be practiced in environments such as industry, law, education, health and social work, and delivered as workshops by staff and external speakers. Abertay Attributes will be formally addressed in each session by students identifying and noting the relevant attributes in Pebblepad or similar.

Aims
This module will develop skills aligned to the Abertay Attributes; Intellectual: Relating psychological models, theories and methods to 'real life' applications. Professional: facilitation of employability skills through running events with external organisations and in the formulation of quality enhancement and quality assurance processes in the module. Personal: Reflection on own and others' qualities through experience of team work, sense of achievement through organising successful events. Active citizenship: Poster on psychological research relating to a society issue. Students will learn to communicate clear messages in plain English verbally in meetings, visually in a poster, and in a documentary film.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Situate and evaluate the usefulness and limitations of psychological research in applied contexts.
2. Use teamwork to research, produce and present a conference poster on a research question of own choice.
3. Give and receive peer feedback optimally, understand purpose, design and practice of assessments and feedback and possible limitations of same.
4. Reflect upon their own knowledge and understanding. Appreciate the employability skills afforded by a degree in psychology.
5. Appreciate the professional skills required to host external guests, organise events, run meetings, facilitate discussions and design and deliver publicity.

Indicative Content
1. Psychology and Technology
How has psychology research influenced technology development such as artificial intelligence and security systems?
2. Psychological Therapies in the Real World
Understanding the applications and impact of psychology therapies, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, and speech and language therapy.
3. Psychology in the Public Sector
Understanding the ways in which local and national governments use psychology research.
4. Psychology in the Workplace
Exploring the impact of psychology on human resource management in the workplace, focusing on issues of equality, diversity and inclusion.
5. Environmental Psychology
To what extent are the environments we live and work in influenced by psychology?
6. Sports Psychology in the Real World
What is sports psychology and how is it applied to issues like duty of care?
7. Applied Forensic Psychology
Applying psychology theory to crime to help answer questions like ‘why do offenders offend?’
8. Applied Educational Psychology
How can psychology theories be applied in teaching, such as supporting children with learning difficulties?

SPS313 Description

This module explores contemporary issues in sport and exercise, particularly those they are likely to encounter and have to navigate in their future employment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : awareness and understanding of contemporary issues in sport and society.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and provide examples of contemporary issues in sport and society.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of historical, cultural and comparative sensitivities within contemporary issues in sport and society.
3. Critically examine sport culture through application of social theory and empirical research.
4. Produce ideas for progressive development of sport and exercise based on critical analysis of contemporary social issues.

Indicative Content
1. Social theory
Students will learn key aspects of social theory that can be/ have been used to explain phenomena in sport and exercise.
2. Inequality and discrimination
Students will explore the main sources of inequality and discrimination in sport and exercise (e.g., gender, social class, ethnicity, LGBTI)
3. Sport and politics
Students will explore how various political systems/ ideologies and governing bodies use sport/athletes as a vehicle for social control.
4. Ethics and sport
Students will learn about moral and ethical issues in sport and exercise (e.g., child protection). Sport and exercise cultures provide a unique environment for moral and ethical issues.

BMT301 Description

The module allows students to gain an understanding of key areas of the subject from existing literature and from a set of example cases that illustrate operations and supply chains in many different settings and markets.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to apply their analysis skills to a variety of operations and supply chain management problems in both the product and service industries.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate and select appropriate approaches to designing, planning, monitoring and controlling operations and supply chains in a range of organisational and inter-organisational contexts.
2. Apply a range of contemporary supply chain and operational techniques to deal with the operational requirements and challenges.

Indicative Content
1. Operations Management in its Organisational Context
The operations function within the organisation and its relationship with other functional areas; The role of the operations manager.
2. Introduction to Supply Chain Management
The supply network; designing the supply chain (make or buy); supply chain stages; uncertainly and risk factors, value chain.
3. Capacity Management
Demand v. production, models of capacity planning, measuring capacity (utilisation and efficiency calculations)
4. Inventory Management
Why hold stock? Costs of inventory, ABC analysis, economic order quantity, inventory management strategies
5. Technology in Operations processes
E-supply chain, IT application in supply chain system, enterprise resource planning, technology strategies
6. The end-to-end supply chain
Purchasing and supply, materials and distribution management, logistics, balancing flow within a supply chain, managing bottlenecks and restrictions.
7. Outsourcing
Make or buy decisions in sourcing strategy; supplier selection; outsourcing supply chain management; co- ordinating supply and managing supplier relationships & partnerships, supply chain risks management
8. The customer interface
Meeting customer requirements, forecasting demand, lean operations and JIT, lean principles, reducing waste
9. Contemporary supply chain dynamics
Supply chain measures, six sigma, strategic alliances and collaborative partnerships, characteristics of supply chains in the contemporary global economy.

CRM301 Description

This module will examine the relationship between gender and crime.

Aims
To explore the ways in which crime is gendered.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the feminist critique of criminology.
2. Understand the relationship between the construction of masculinity and femininity and crime.
3. Explore the relationship between crime and 'doing gender'.

Indicative Content
1. The Feminist Critique of Criminology
The emergence of the feminist critique and the challenge to the feminine 'other'.
2. Women and Crime
The pattern of women's crime. Deviance, femininity and the response to female transgression.
3. Men and Crime
Masculinity and crime, crime as structured action, crime as a resource for doing gender. The situational context and crime.

Social Science - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Social Science course.

Module 1: SOC204 Crime, Media and the State

Module 2: choose one of the following:

CRM204 Criminological Theories II: Crime, Power and Social Change 

PSY206 Essential Research Methods and Analysis for Psychology

SPS204 Social Science of Physical Activity and Health

BMT202 Project Management

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Social Science course.

Module 1: SOC305 Researching Society

For modules 2 & 3, choose two of the following, or one of the following and one elective module

PSY302 Human Development across the Lifespan

SPS309 Physical Activity and Health Promotion

BMT303 The Future of Work

CRM305 Penal Institutions

SOC204 Description

This module will look at media discourses of criminal activity and the state.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to develop an understanding of relationships between states and criminal activity, and the complex media centred discourses emerging from these. In so doing it will provide students with an interpretive framework for analysing historical and contemporary discourses of state criminal activity.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and evaluate key theories and examples associated with state criminal activity.
2. Identify and evaluate key theories and examples associated with the state and political violence.
3. Identify and evaluate key theories and examples associated with role of the media and state criminal activity.

Indicative Content
1. Crimes of the Powerful
The state as criminal actor
2. Media, Crime and Power
3. Investigative Journalism, Corruption and the Political Process
4. State Corporate Corruption
5. The Nation State and Violence
6. Terrorism and Counter Terrorism in the Global War on Terror
7. Crimes Against Humanity
8. Transnational Organized Crime
9. The Geopolitical War on Drugs
10. Discourses from Below – Urban Legends, Conspiracy theories and other Stigmatized Knowledge

CRM204 Description

This module addresses the emergence and development of key criminological perspectives of continuing relevance for the understanding of crime and processes of criminalization.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : a detailed understanding and effective appreciation of criminological theories that address issues of crime, processes of criminalization and structures of power within the context of wider social, cultural and political change.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse the key features of a criminological theory and illustrate this in relation to a contemporary area of crime, criminality and / or criminal justice.
2. Assess the contribution of criminological perspectives that attempt to contextualize and explain social patterns of crime, deviance and conformity.
3. Assess the contribution of criminological perspectives that emphasize the possession and exercise of power and the consequences of social change in the production of crime and criminalization.
4. Reflect upon the ways in which different criminological perspectives are shaped by the historical, social and political contexts of their development.

Indicative Content
1. Challenging criminological positivism
Labelling perspectives, Marxism and crisis, The New Criminology / Radical Criminology
2. Theorizing and managing crime and criminality
Left realism, Right realism, Control theories, Situational crime prevention
3. Innovation in criminological theory
Feminist criminology, Critical criminology / Green Criminology, Cultural criminology

PSY206 Description

To build on research methods knowledge and prepare student for third year Core Research Methods

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the opportunity to further develop the knowledge and skills required to design, conduct, analyse and report quantitative and qualitative psychological research in APA format

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Report, design and conduct ethically acceptable psychological research using techniques taught on the module.
2. Report, evaluate psychological research and present this in APA format.
3. Use SPSS to analyse empirical data utilising a variety of statistical techniques.
4. Identify and locate, using a variety of resources, suitable reference material for practical work.
5. Demonstrate, via assessment a good understanding of the key principles of psychological research design and data interpretation

Indicative Content
1. Methods of Research
Main quantitative and qualitative research methods available to psychologists; Use in applied settings; advantages and disadvantages
2. The Experimental Method
Variables and levels; hypotheses; design - basic and advanced; control techniques; validity and reliability in experimentation; ethics in experimentation
3. Data Analysis - Descriptive Statistics
Data types; measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; normal distribution; graphing data; confidence intervals.
4. Data Analysis - Inferential Statistics
Test selection; parametric and nonparametric 2-sample test of difference; Within and Between one-way ANOVA and Non-parametric ANOVA, effect size; power; correlation; Tests of both internal and external reliability; inter rater reliability
5. Qualitative Methods
Types of qualitative research techniques; questionnaire design, interviewing - types, advantages, disadvantages; analysing interview material.
6. Quantitative Methods
Experimental method, two variable tests of difference (parametric and non-parametric), tests of relationships (parametric and non-parametric); multilevel testing (parametric and non-parametric), follow up testing (parametric and non-parametric). Reliability analysis using Cronbach's alpha, quantitative content analysis, item analysis
7. Ethics
Creating and conducting ethical research based on BPS Ethical Guidelines
8. Reporting Research
Sections and content of an APA formatted psychology lab report; APA referencing
9. Information Searching
Structured and unstructured search; Search using the Internet and locating electronic journals using the university library system and appropriate data bases
10. I.T.Skills
Designing a lab report template using Word for Windows; using SPSS for data analysis.

SPS204 Description

This module introduces the student to social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of key social issues in physical activity and health contexts.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify and describe disciplines within the study of physical activity and health that are associated with the social sciences.
2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of key issues in physical activity and health.
3. Identify key structures and governing bodies/policies associated with health and physical activity.
4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of methodologies associated with physical activity and health and what they help us to learn/explain.

Indicative Content
1. Interdisciplinary nature of social sciences
Students will explore the ways in which various disciplines within social science help us to understand and explain issues relating to physical activity and health (e.g., sociology of sport, sociology of health and illness, epidemiology, sport development, sport history)
2. Critically engage with the notion of ‘healthy’ lifestyles
Students will question the construction of ‘healthy’ living
3. Research topics within the social sciences
Students will make connections between the approaches/findings of physical activity and health research and how these inform debates around agency− structure
4. Political Ideology and Social Inequalities
Students will question the ways in which health and physical activity participation are framed by political ideologies and consider how and why this influences social inequalities
5. Qualitative methodologies
Students will be introduced to qualitative research and how it has developed our understanding of physical activity and health.

BMT202 Description

This module examines the tools and techniques associated with managing projects. Students will also carry out an investigation into a project failure and recommend alternative actions which could have been taken

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: an appreciation of the complexity of project management and the tools and techniques performed to aid successful management.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Select, use and explain the various tools and techniques which form part of the project planning and management process.
2. Analyse a project case study and identify where improvements could have been made.

Indicative Content
1. Project management and project teams
Intepreting project specifications and objectives, and the requirements of project stakeholders; Key project challenges for individuals and groups: reviewing the key priorities of time and project management; Understanding the role of a project leader; Understanding team work and how effective teams function; Creating and contributing to effective project teams; Managing teams through project delivery; maintaining goal focus, and managing problems.
2. Project analysis and planning
Analysing project requirements and sub-tasks; Estimating timelines; deadlines and milestones and activity durations; Constructing a project schedule; Resourcing projects; Allocating and smoothing resources; Using Gantt charts to allocate and monitor resource allocation; Project management tools; Using project management software.
3. Managing Projects
Dealing with project risk; Evaluating the probability and potential impact of risk; contingency planning for risk management; project tracking and revision to completion; Evaluating project delivery and management: Analysing the effectiveness of project management processes and the impact of project delivery and non-delivery.
4. Project Management Methodologies
The use of project management methodologies such as Prince2 and SCRUM.

SOC305 Description

Principles and practice of social science research methods.

Aims
The aims of this module are to equip students with an understanding of the importance of empirical research to the social sciences. It will provide students with the skills and capabilities to identify and use appropriate data collection tools, apply analysis techniques to data generated and reflect upon their meaning, relevance and ethical implications. In acquiring these skills and capabilities, students will be well-placed to engage with and carry out social research.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the principles of statistical analysis and quantitative data collection.
2. Carry out basic statistical tests on quantitative data and identify the appropriate context for their application.
3. Apply qualitative data collection techniques and reflect upon their appropriateness to different research scenarios.
4. Demonstrate the ability to devise and critically apply an inductive coding framework to qualitative data.

Indicative Content
1. Principles of quantitative research
The first part of the module will introduce students to the elements of statistical data, how quantitative data is collected, structured and presented, how inferences and conclusions can be drawn through the application of basic statistical tests and how SPSS software can facilitate the organization and analysis of quantitative data.
2. Qualitative data collection skills
The second part of the module will provide an overview of an array of qualitative data-collection methods, how such techniques are applicable in an array of different ways to different research contexts and how students should reflect upon themselves as active participants in these kinds of research endeavours.
3. Approaches to qualitative data analysis
The latter half of the module also provides opportunities for students to engage in the analysis of data produced using qualitative data collection techniques. The main emphasis here will be on thematic coding and how qualitative researchers use sociological knowledge to inductive derive systematic meaning from the data they generate. This part of the module will also introduce students to the use of NVivo computer software in qualitative data analysis.
4. Research ethics and ethical issues
The module also examines research ethics and ethical issues in terms of research subject matter, the application of data collection methods, how research can impact in different ways upon research participants and wider society, as well as the formal ethical guidelines and requirements that govern sociological research.

PSY302 Description

This is a BPS core psychology module that examines theories, methods and empirical data relevant to psychological development throughout the lifespan.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge and understanding of theories and empirical data in the core areas of developmental psychology and changes throughout the lifespan.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand and critically evaluate theories of psychological development in light of relevant empirical research.
2. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of developmental change in cognition, emotion, socialisation and physical development, including major developmental milestones in children and adolescents.
3. Show a critical awareness of current thinking on the interaction between biological bases and environmental influences in development.
4. Demonstrate conceptual knowledge of research methods in the domain of development and knowledge of when to apply these.

Indicative Content
1. Biological basis of development; theories and milestones
Pre-and postnatal brain development, brain maturation, biological basis of ageing.
2. How to study development?
Designs and approaches.
3. Infancy
Methods for studying infant development, physical development in infancy, cognitive development in infancy: Memory and pre- cursors to language, social and emotional development in infancy.
4. Early Childhood
Methods for studying early childhood, physical and cognitive development in early childhood, language development in early childhood, social and emotional development in early childhood, moral development in early childhood.
5. Middle Childhood
Physical and cognitive development in middle childhood, social development and peer relations in middle childhood. Emotional and Moral Development in Middle Childhood
6. Adolescence
Physical and cognitive development in adolescence, social and emotional development in adolescence.
7. Adulthood
Biological, cognitive and social changes in middle adulthood. Theories and data on midlife crisis.
8. Ageing
Biological, cognitive and social changes in late adulthood; models of cognitive decline; emotional and personality changes, dementia, death, longevity.

SPS309 Description

This module introduces the student to health issues high on the policy agenda and the ways in which participation in physical activity can be and is promoted as a way of addressing these issues.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the students with an understanding of the complexities of health promotion and the potential for participation in physical activity to both alleviate and exacerbate contemporary health issues.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the concept of health and health promotion.
2. Critically discuss the importance of promoting physical activity in contemporary society.
3. Explain how health promotion interventions may often exacerbate existing health inequalities.
4. Appraise a physical activity intervention in relation to its potential impact on health inequalities.

Indicative Content
1. Defining Health
Students will understand the different ways in which health can and will be defined
2. Complexity of health promotion in contemporary Society
Students will explore the ways in which health promotion has the potential to both reduce and exacerbate existing social inequalities
3. Physical activity, its determinants and importance for health promotion
Students will develop a critical understanding of what factors influence physical activity and its fundamental role in health promotion
4. Critical Engagement with the Obesity ‘Epidemic’
Students will develop a critical understanding of why obesity is prioritised on the health policy agenda
5. Health promotion, physical activity and the environment
Students will explore the environmental factors that influence the promotion of health and physical activity participation

BMT303 Description

This module examines how the complexities, dynamics and uncertainties of the contemporary business environment impacts on the organisation of work and the contemporary employment relationship.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with :skills of analysis needed to assess the impact of a turbulent globalised business environment upon the future of management, the nature of work and the the employment relationship.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Examine the impact of changing business contexts on complex organisations and the resulting critical challenges
2. Examine the changing nature of work and new employment relationships
3. Assess the interplay of power, politics and conflict management in decision making and business operations
4. Evaluate the contribution of HR interventions in the future development of human capital with particular reference to knowledge intensive organisations.

Indicative Content
1. The future working context
The changing context of work, post bureaucratic society, Millennial, and high performance work contexts
2. The new employment relationship and new forms of control
Flexible work and the precariat, The changing nature of capital - emotional and aesthetic labour; The psychological contract;
3. Conflict in the workplace
The changing nature of power and politics in organisational decision-making and management practice. The changing nature of contemporary employee relations; organisational misbehaviour and counter-productive work behaviours
4. Human capital development
The learning organisation and organisational learning, technology mediated work processes, talent sourcing and human capability and knowledge management; career planning and development, rewards and recognition.
5. Outcomes
Learning from high performance organisations; Engaging employees, employee engagement and discretionary effort; building organisational resilience.

CRM305 Description

This module provides knowledge and understanding of the prison system, the experience of imprisonment and penal policy and practice in the UK.

Aims
To provide the student with the opportunity to explore developments in penal policy and practice, the lived experience of imprisonment and considers alternatives to imprisonment.It will also consider some of the issues surrounding detention and incarceration for foreign nationals.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Collaborate with other students in discussion and presentation to critically assess and evaluate penal policy in modern British society.
2. Critically assess the effect of imprisonment as a form of punishment on prisoners and their families through detailed enquiry based learning on the challenges that confront them.
3. Identify and assess the effectiveness of alternatives to custody through confidently using and evaluating statistical evidence on alternative disposals.
4. Critically examine the complex nature of attitudes to imprisonment and challenge thinking on penal abolition and punitive discourses.
5. Critically examine the growing concerns relating to the detention of foreign nationals in the UK

Indicative Content
1. Contemporary developments in Penal Theory, Policy & Practice
Penal institutions in contemporary society.The crises of legitimacy in penal institutions. Reorganisation and reform. Privatisation of the prison system.
2. Prison Life The Reality
'Doing time' the actuality of prison life, the 'total institution'? Strategies for survival, regime activities, 'banged up' prisoners, prison staff and civilian staff. Dealing with social exclusion. The diversity of the prison population. Stratification and power within prisons.
3. Alternatives to Imprisonment The Way Forward?
Reducing risk or protecting the public? Reducing fear of crime? Human or humane containment and warehousing. Therapeutic prisons. Electronic tagging, community service orders, mediation/reparation.
4. Attitudes to imprisonment
Why do we have prisons? Why are they at the centre of penal policy? Are they culturally 'acceptable'? Abolitionism.
5. Foreign Nationals
detention centres; foreign national prisoners and race relations in prisons; are immigration detention centres new types of penal establishments; critical issues surrounding foreign national prisoners in the UK

School of Design and Informatics

Please find below the pathways for the following subject areas:

  • Computing
  • Ethical Hacking
  • Computer Games Technology
  • Computer Game Applications Development
  • Computer Arts
  • Game Design and Production

Computing - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Computing course.

Module 1: CMP201 Data Structures and Algorithms 1

Module 2: CMP205 Application Design

Module 3: CMP204 Dynamic Web Development 1

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Computing course.

Module 1: CMP306 Dynamic Web Development 2

Module 2: CMP308 Professional Project Planning and Prototyping (TBC)

Module 3: CMP307 Software Engineering Practice

CMP201 Description

Building on students' knowledge of programming facilities taught in Level 7 programming modules (e.g. arrays, structures, simple collections), this module introduces the standard data structures and algorithms that form the core of algorithmic thought in computer science, and introduces students to the idea of reasoning about the behaviour and performance of a computer program.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : To familiarise students with the standard data structures and algorithms that underpin software design and development.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe abstract and concrete requirements for data structures and algorithms.
2. Describe a range of standard data structures and algorithms, in terms of both functionality and performance characteristics.
3. By reasoning about behaviour and performance, be able to critically select appropriate data structures and algorithms for a given application within a software project.

Indicative Content
1. Reasoning about performance
The idea of an algorithm, time and space complexity, abstract data types
2. Basic data structures
Linked lists, stacks, queues, hash tables
3. Sorting and searching
Exhaustive and binary search, common sorting algorithms
4. Trees
Simple trees, tree search algorithms, tree representations (XML, JSON)
5. Graphs
Simple and directed graphs, graph algorithms

CMP205 Description

This module develops students’ understanding and experience in the design and implementation of object-oriented software and relational databases. In both of these contexts, students will review existing designs, develop their own designs to meet stated requirements, critically evaluate these designs and create example implementations from these designs.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to review, develop, critically evaluate and implement designs in the contexts of object-oriented software and relational databases.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. create entity relationship models reflecting the requirements of application domains;
2. develop and implement OO designs incorporating relevant inheritance, composition and interface relationships that reflect application requirements;
3. develop database designs with associated SQL to meet application data requirements;
4. compare and contrast different software development methodologies, designing and implementing an application within one specific such methodology.

Indicative Content
1. Entity relationship (ER) modelling:
identifying entities; 1-1, 1-many and many-many relationships; design notation; ER in OO software and database design.
2. Relational database design:
Using primary and foreign keys to realise 1-1 and 1-many relationships; link tables for many-many relationships; designing to meet application data requirements; normalisation.
3. SQL:
SQL as a programming language; basic relational algebra; expressing unions and joins; selecting, extracting, editing and inserting data; writing SQL to meet functional requirements.
4. OO software and SQL:
including SQL into OO software; integrating OO software and database designs; realising designs in code.
5. Development methodologies:
the role of a methodology; review different methodologies such as waterfall, RAD, agile, TDD; appraise the role of design within different methodologies.

CMP204 Description

This module introduces the student to dynamic web applications, through client-side and server-side web development.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the necessary skills to develop secure dynamic web applications, providing client-side and server-side interaction.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe and apply web standards using HTTPS, HTML5 and CSS to develop responsive designs.
2. Apply JavaScript, libraries, and frameworks to create effective user interfaces within an appropriate development practice and methodology.
3. Describe and implement dynamic applications that include the use of relevant data persistence, client-side technologies, and server-side technologies.
4. Discuss relevant legal and security issues in relation to dynamic web applications.

Indicative Content
1. Web standards
Application of HTML5 and CSS to develop responsive designs.
2. Client-side technologies
Implementation of JavaScript, libraries, and frameworks to create effective user interfaces within an appropriate development practice and methodology.
3. Design techniques
Appropriate techniques for dynamic web applications.
4. Data persistence
The use of relevant data persistence and consideration of appropriate use.
5. Server-side scripting technologies;
Using server-side technologies to provide functionality. Consideration of the processes involved, and the benefits/drawbacks of processing on the server.
6. Security and legal issues
Consider legal and security issues including privacy, transparency, data protection, GDPR, authorisation and validation.
7. Practical aspects of security
Appropriate use of network protocols, secure programming, and testing strategies.

CMP306 Description

Students will develop an understanding of web application development, by learning to create a database back-end and related server-side scripts. Key concepts in web application development such as security will be elucidated. Throughout the module the need for a professional approach to web application design and development will be emphasised

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the necessary skills to enable them to develop complex database driven web applications, effectively employing server side technology.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Plan and implement an effective web application supporting database transactions using a server based database management system.
2. Design and develop a standards compliant web application utilising a back end engine that integrates parsed HTML and dynamic data.
3. Critically evaluate different design issues in building complex database driven internet solutions.
4. Evaluate web application development from the perspective of security and countermeasures.

Indicative Content
1. Dynamic Site Basics.
Write sites in HTML5 supported by CSS with a framework (eg. Bootstrap). Design and implement a database to store data in relational form; use PHP to extract data and deliver to the web page. Use of Javascript.
2. Database Management Systems:Server-Side Scripting
Examine issues such as concurrency and distributed database, OO, SQL and NoSQL.Using techniques to develop a structured approach to scripting. Use of prepared statements to enforce secure scripting. Understanding of the MVC architecture and separation of Model, View Controller. Use of API and Web Services to deliver content from the database.
3. Web Application Architectures:Security
Explore the 3−tier architecture and techniques of ensuring the separation of these tiers. Management of sites to allow interface changes without affecting the processing or databaseRunning through the whole module is the idea of secure coding. Main threats to the security of dynamic web applications and their data. Implement countermeasures to security threats within the context of differing types of application.
4. Databases
Appropriate use of the Relational database model to store data for dynamic web sites. Alternative models including NoSQL database model.
5. JSON
JavaScript Object Model - Use of JSON as a data description language. Using JSON to deliver data between applications and servers. XML as an alternative.
6. State Management within HTTP
Use of Cookies in web development. Sessions and session management. Client Management and Application Management within PHP. Examination of different models from other technologies.
7. Client-Side Scripting
Review of Javascript as a client side language. Use of frameworks such as JQuery and AngularJS. Extension to Javascript server side development.
8. AJAX - RIA
Use of AJAX to develop web pages. Single page Web Applications using AJAX (RIA). Especially building Mobile Web Apps.
9. Internet of Things
Basic architecture of node / sensor domain, database and application domain. Creation of big data; upload to servers. Interrogation of servers to get information on the mobile device.
10. Mobile Internet Sites
Creation of mobile internet sites. Inclusion of special features that make the mobile more appropriate especially location.

CMP308 Description

Working within a team, students will learn about project management concepts that enable them to create a project proposal in a professional manner and present their work in a client pitch to a stakeholder. The project briefs are drawn from current industry and/or research based problem areas. Students are expected to engage fully in their team role and are thus expected to communicate effectively with project stakeholders, contribute to the planning of the project, develop artefacts or prototypes, write associated documentation, and create and present the client pitch.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the students with the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a team and in interaction with project stakeholders, and understand principles of project management.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate and select appropriate project management techniques and investigation frameworks to create a project plan for an investigative or development project related to the student's course of study
2. Develop a prototype or artefact related to the student's course of study
3. Develop teamwork and communication skills through team collaboration on a project proposal and client pitch

Indicative Content
1. Research
Research: Background, competitors, prior art, project benefits
2. Project
Project management concepts, Agile, Scrum
3. Activities
Activities, deliverables and products
4. Managing
Managing time and resources
5. Identifying
Identifying and managing risks
6. Quality considerations
Professional standards and quality assurance
7. Develop
Develop artefacts, prototypes
8. Interacting
Interacting with clients and team members

CMP307 Description

This module develops students’ understanding and experience in design/programming within a software engineering context.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to review, critically evaluate and apply software engineering practice in the development of object-oriented software solutions.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Explain, compare and contrast software development methodologies such as waterfall, agile and continuous delivery;
2. Describe and apply Code construction concepts including coupling, cohesion, test-driven development and source control;
3. Describe and apply design principles and design patterns;
4. Explain and use Secure coding practices.

Indicative Content
1. Software engineering (SE):
What is SE? Application to development process; application to programming practices.
2. SE Development methodologies:
Agile development; Waterfall Model; Continuous delivery.
3. Source control:
Strategies; tools; git.
4. Code construction issues:
Design concepts: Coupling and Cohesion; test-driven development.
5. Unified Modelling Language (UML):
Use case diagrams; Sequence diagrams; Class diagrams; State-machine diagrams; Activity diagrams;
6. Patterns
Pattern catalogues; reviewing a pattern; strategy pattern; observer pattern and variants; pattern implementation.
7. Secure OO coding practices:
Identifying coding vulnerabilities; types of exploits; protection through good programming practice; use of assertions
8. Protecting against the user:
Full input verification & validation; handling passwords and encryption; avoiding information leakage via uncaught exceptions.

Computing - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Computing course.

Module 1: CMP202 Data Structures and Algorithms 2

Module 2: CMP206 Programming For The User

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Computing course.

Module 1: CMP309 Software Development for Mobile Devices

Module 2: CMP304 Artificial Intelligence

Module 3: CMP311 Professional Project Development and Delivery (TBC)

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

CMP202 Description

This module builds on Data Structures and Algorithms 1 by introducing students to some of the practical performance concerns in the selection and implementation of parallel algorithms, using a range of case studies drawn from typical real-world applications.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : To develop computational and algorithmic thinking and show how data structures and algorithms are used efficiently in real-world applications.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Be aware of the standard techniques of software performance measurement, including profiling, and apply these techniques to identify performance bottlenecks in real programs.
2. Understand the emerging importance of parallel programming in modern software development, and experiment with the performance impact of parallelising parts of an application.
3. Describe a variety of application-specific algorithms (sorting/numerical/image processing) and associated data structures in common use, and discuss the benefits and limitations of parallelisation.

Indicative Content
1. Measuring performance
Basic techniques, sources of error [round off, range, instability, discretisation], profiling, analysing and presenting results
2. Parallel programming
Why to parallelise, Amdahl's law, high-level approaches to parallelisation, parallel design
3. Low-level programming with threads
Starting and joining threads, sharing data safely, mutual exclusion, synchronisation objects, lock-free
4. High-level parallel programming
Task-based parallelism, data-parallel problems, exploiting locality
5. Instruction-level parallelism
SIMD instructions, automatic vectorisation
6. GPGPU
GPU architectures, appropriate algorithms for GPUs, GPU profiling
7. Application case studies
Awareness of common sorting, numerical, image processing and searching and optimization algorithms (and associated data structures) and a recognition as to which are relevant for chosen field of study e.g. Spatial trees, pathfinding and AI, database indexing, password hashing, simulation, file carving] and which can benefit from parallelisation.

CMP206 Description

This module will introduce students to generic concepts for the optimization of interactions between a user and computing systems and service, and how these interactions can be evaluated. Students will learn about research methods, quantitative and qualitative data analysis, and ethics in the data gathering process, as well as interface design. Aspects of usability and accessibility will be explored.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the opportunity to evaluate and design interfaces under consideration of usability and accessibility of the interface.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically appraise user interface design for desktop, web and mobile platforms
2. Perform simple experiments and analyses to evidence understanding of research within the computing area
3. Design an interface under consideration of usability and accessibility issues in computing

Indicative Content
1. Designing Experiments
Creating and building small experiments that relate to aspects of computing
2. Usability and Accessibility
Developing interfaces that are usable and accessible under consideration of platform
3. Professional and Ethical Issues
Consideration of issues that affect professionalism and ethical procedures in computing industries
4. Data Analysis and Evaluation
Quantitative and qualitative data analysis methods

CMP309 Description

This module develops a critical understanding of software development practices which can be used to develop applications for a range of mobile devices. Students will develop and evaluate the techniques used to implement mobile applications.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the ability to design, develop and critically evaluate software for the mobile platform.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Design and implement mobile software incorporating appropriate UI design for multi-device applications using native frameworks and libraries;
2. Discuss the devices, designs and languages relevant to smart and mobile operating systems;
3. Use network programming constructs including sockets and protocols to include security, location and privacy functionality in mobile applications;
4. Critically appraise usability and accessibility in mobile applications, identifying and exemplifying good practice.

Indicative Content
1. Background to Smart and Mobile Development:
Challenges and limitations in developing for mobile devices. Development strategies, emulators and development environments. Use of the application abstraction to allow easier development.
2. User Interfaces:
Development of interfaces for user-interaction including UI controls (buttons, forms) and underlying hardware controls (key presses, touch screen). Basic control of a mobile device using the high-level user interface. Use of commands and forms to gain data from the client. Use of low-level features to display data to the user. Use of key presses to control real-time application.
3. Storage:
Consideration of storage requirements for mobile devices. Saving and retrieving local and remote storage. Overview of database design. Use of remote databases, and how to use server-side databases in an internet application. Use of internet-based scripting to generate server-side text for the client.
4. Location awareness
Utilising the network location capabilities of mobile devices to develop feature rich applications.
5. Telephony SMS
Understanding the telephony and SMS stack on the mobile device and the use of API’s required for their access and control.
6. Communication Networks
Using short and long-distance networks for communication and understanding of the limitations and benefits of each.
7. Security
Consider the security implications of mobile and smart platforms, how these can be exploited and development considerations to improve resilience.
8. Performance
Methods for testing the functionality and performance of applications on mobile devices.
9. Mobile Web Application Development
Explore and evaluate a range of mobile solution options from response design, Firebase-, and JavaScript-based applications.

CMP304 Description

This module provides an introduction to some of the many Artificial Intelligence techniques which are currently, or could in the near future, be used to enhance the development of intelligent systems applied to various application domains.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge of how artificial intelligence techniques can be used effectively within an application environment to provide intelligence and/or the illusion of intelligence.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically examine various artificial intelligence techniques.
2. Develop a critical understanding of AI techniques and technologies.
3. Evaluate the use of AI technologies and techniques for specific purposes.

Indicative Content
1. ‘Traditional’ AI:
Rule Based Systems, Finite State Machines.
2. Academic AI Techniques:
Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy State Machines, Case Basde Reasoning, Genetic Algorithms, Reinforcement Learning, Probibalistic Techniques, Artificial Neural Networks, Clustering Algorithms.
3. Applications of AI:
Combining AI techniques to produce A-life and Intelligent Agents.
4. Machine Learning:
The ability of a machine to learn from its environment
5. Mining
Knowledge discovery and the process of finding hidden patterns in data
6. Big Data
The challenge of the 21st century is ‘too much data and not enough analysis’. Explore the challenges and opportunities afforded by this phenomenon.
7. Intelligence on the Internet:
Analyse the emergence of intelligent agents on the internet.

CMP311 Description

This module involves completing a team based development project or other technical investigation project, which was planned and initially developed in CMP308 (Software Project Management). The nature of the project will be relevant to the programme studied by the student.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the opportunity to develop a product or technical solution by applying design, development and evaluation principles in a team environment; the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a team and in interaction with project stakeholders.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Select and use appropriate project management techniques and tools to design, implement, test and evaluate a product
2. Contribute effectively to presentation and communication activities including demonstrating the developed product to stakeholders in a client pitch and project report
3. Work effectively within a team and critically appraise the individual contribution

Indicative Content
1. Orientation
Consolidation of project teams and target problem
2. Project principles
Required development methodologies during product production
3. Documentation
The importance and content of a requirements specification and related documentation
4. Design
The role of design and redesign during project development
5. Implementation
Implementation issues and approaches
6. Quality and Standards
Testing and evaluation methods and execution.
7. Communication
Oral and written communication and demonstration of software product
8. Project planning and team working
Planning the project, organising a team, supporting colleagues, devising weekly plans, keeping progress records
9. Self−evaluation
Personal contribution to team progress, logbook

Ethical Hacking - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Ethical Hacking course.

Module 1: CMP201 Data Structures and Algorithms 1

Module 2: CMP210 Ethical Hacking 1

Module 3: CMP204 Dynamic Web Development 1

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Ethical Hacking course.

Module 1: CMP314 Computer Networking 2

Module 2: CMP308 Professional Project Planning and Prototyping (TBC)

Module 3: CMP319 Ethical Hacking 2

CMP201 Description

Building on students' knowledge of programming facilities taught in Level 7 programming modules (e.g. arrays, structures, simple collections), this module introduces the standard data structures and algorithms that form the core of algorithmic thought in computer science, and introduces students to the idea of reasoning about the behaviour and performance of a computer program.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : To familiarise students with the standard data structures and algorithms that underpin software design and development.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe abstract and concrete requirements for data structures and algorithms.
2. Describe a range of standard data structures and algorithms, in terms of both functionality and performance characteristics.
3. By reasoning about behaviour and performance, be able to critically select appropriate data structures and algorithms for a given application within a software project.

Indicative Content
1. Reasoning about performance
The idea of an algorithm, time and space complexity, abstract data types
2. Basic data structures
Linked lists, stacks, queues, hash tables
3. Sorting and searching
Exhaustive and binary search, common sorting algorithms
4. Trees
Simple trees, tree search algorithms, tree representations (XML, JSON)
5. Graphs
Simple and directed graphs, graph algorithms

CMP210 Description

This module develops a critical understanding of the tools used by Ethical Hackers to examine the security of a device or network. Students will systematically investigate a computer network for possible vulnerabilities.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to assess the security of a computer system.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Undertake research to select appropriate methods of investigating the security of a computer network.
2. Evaluate and assess the security of a typical computer system.
3. Document details of an ethical hacking methodology.

Indicative Content
1. Footprinting
Determining the location of a company. Examining computer networks using passive techniques.
2. Search Engines
Using Search Engines to find ethical hacking information. Information limiting.
3. Scanning
Using tools to scan for IP addresses and operating systems in use on a network or in an organisation. Identify services that are running on a network. Different types of port scans and useful tools.
4. Enumeration
Tools and techniques for enumerating networks and identifying exploitable shares, usernames and E-Mail addresses.
5. System Hacking
Privilege Escalation, Keystroke Loggers. Mitigations against keyloggers. Operating System and Application Hacking. Examining and exploiting System flaws. Understanding the need to install and patch applications.
6. Vulnerabilities
What are the principle vulnerabilities that computer systems are exposed to? How are they exploited. What are the techniques that can be used to assess them and the security of a system?
7. Development of supporting documentation
Example-led consideration of how to write clearly and concisely.

 

CMP204 Description

This module introduces the student to dynamic web applications, through client-side and server-side web development.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the necessary skills to develop secure dynamic web applications, providing client-side and server-side interaction.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe and apply web standards using HTTPS, HTML5 and CSS to develop responsive designs.
2. Apply JavaScript, libraries, and frameworks to create effective user interfaces within an appropriate development practice and methodology.
3. Describe and implement dynamic applications that include the use of relevant data persistence, client-side technologies, and server-side technologies.
4. Discuss relevant legal and security issues in relation to dynamic web applications.

Indicative Content
1. Web standards
Application of HTML5 and CSS to develop responsive designs.
2. Client-side technologies
Implementation of JavaScript, libraries, and frameworks to create effective user interfaces within an appropriate development practice and methodology.
3. Design techniques
Appropriate techniques for dynamic web applications.
4. Data persistence
The use of relevant data persistence and consideration of appropriate use.
5. Server-side scripting technologies;
Using server-side technologies to provide functionality. Consideration of the processes involved, and the benefits/drawbacks of processing on the server.
6. Security and legal issues
Consider legal and security issues including privacy, transparency, data protection, GDPR, authorisation and validation.
7. Practical aspects of security
Appropriate use of network protocols, secure programming, and testing strategies.

CMP314 Description

This module introduces the ideas and concepts of how computers, mobile devices and gadgets communicate via a wide range of communications technologies with each other and other devices. This will include interactions via technologies such as Ethernet, VLANS, STP, Wireless, Routing, Subnetting, IPv6, SNMP, DHCP, DNS, Firewalls and Network Management

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the key technologies used by computer devices to communicate with each other, along with the skills required to analyse weakness’s in the current technologies and propose solutions that would help to stop the weaknesses.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the communications technologies which can be used to communicate between network devices.
2. Critically evaluate the security of a range of technologies used for communicating in a network.
3. Appreciate the issues of network design and management

Indicative Content
1. VLANS
Describe the core concept of VLANS and trunking along with the common attacks that can be used against them
2. STP
Investigate how STP can be used to create a loop free network and how this can be exploited by an attacker
3. Static Routing
Examine how routing works and show it can be used for pivoting deeper into a network
4. Subnetting and Variable Length Subnet Masks
Classful and classless addressing. Benefits and impact on routing protocols. Design of LANs using VLSM techniques
5. Network Application protocols
Investigation into various networking protocols used at the application layer of the OSI model along with common security weaknesses.
6. Firewalls
Software and hardware firewalls - their application, uses and how to counter them.
7. Intrusion Detection Systems
Examine how Intrusion detection systems work and how they can be bypassed
8. Network Management
Examine network management protocols (Simple Network Management Protocol SNMP) and current practice

 

CMP308 Description

Working within a team, students will learn about project management concepts that enable them to create a project proposal in a professional manner and present their work in a client pitch to a stakeholder. The project briefs are drawn from current industry and/or research based problem areas. Students are expected to engage fully in their team role and are thus expected to communicate effectively with project stakeholders, contribute to the planning of the project, develop artefacts or prototypes, write associated documentation, and create and present the client pitch.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the students with the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a team and in interaction with project stakeholders, and understand principles of project management.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate and select appropriate project management techniques and investigation frameworks to create a project plan for an investigative or development project related to the student's course of study
2. Develop a prototype or artefact related to the student's course of study
3. Develop teamwork and communication skills through team collaboration on a project proposal and client pitch

Indicative Content
1. Research
Research: Background, competitors, prior art, project benefits
2. Project
Project management concepts, Agile, Scrum
3. Activities
Activities, deliverables and products
4. Managing
Managing time and resources
5. Identifying
Identifying and managing risks
6. Quality considerations
Professional standards and quality assurance
7. Develop
Develop artefacts, prototypes
8. Interacting
Interacting with clients and team members

CMP319 Description

This module develops a critical understanding of advanced techniques used by Ethical Hackers to examine the security of web applications.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of advanced computer hacking and the countermeasures that a company can take to minimise their effect.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse and critically evaluate techniques used to break into an insecure web application and identify relevant countermeasures.
2. Critically evaluate specific countermeasures to advanced hacking techniques
3. Demonstrate a critical evaluation of an advanced security topic with an independent project.

Indicative Content
1. Web Application Security
Core Defence Mechanisms. Handling User Access, Authentication, Session Management, Access Control.
2. Web Application Technologies
HTTP Protocol, Requests, Responses and Methods. Encoding schemes. Server side functionality technologies (Java, ASP, PHP).
3. Injecting Code
Attacking SQL Servers, Sniffing, Brute Forcing and finding Application Configuration Files, Input validation attacks. Preventive Measures.
4. Bypassing Client Side Controls
Manipulating cookies, URL parameters, ActiveX controls, Shockwave controls.
5. Attacking Authentication
Attacking Session Management, Design Flaws in Authentication Mechanisms Attacking Forgotten Password Functionality, attacking Password change functions. Countermeasures to authentication attacks
6. XSS
Reflected XSS Vulnerabilities, Stored XSS Vulnerabilities, DOM-Based XSS Vulnerabilities, HTTP Header Injection. Countermeasures to XSS.
7. Web Server Security
Popular web servers and common security threats. Attacks against IIS and Apache. Increasing web server security. Countermeasures (e.g. correct Web Application Set-up).

 

Ethical Hacking - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Ethical Hacking course.

Module 1: CMP202 Data Structures and Algorithms 2

Module 2: CMP209 Digital Forensics 1

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Ethical Hacking course.

Module 1: CMP309 Software Development for Mobile Devices

Module 2: CMP320 Ethical Hacking 3

Module 3: CMP311 Professional Project Development and Delivery (TBC)

You also have the option to swap any one of these modules for one of our elective modules

CMP202 Description

This module builds on Data Structures and Algorithms 1 by introducing students to some of the practical performance concerns in the selection and implementation of parallel algorithms, using a range of case studies drawn from typical real-world applications.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : To develop computational and algorithmic thinking and show how data structures and algorithms are used efficiently in real-world applications.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Be aware of the standard techniques of software performance measurement, including profiling, and apply these techniques to identify performance bottlenecks in real programs.
2. Understand the emerging importance of parallel programming in modern software development, and experiment with the performance impact of parallelising parts of an application.
3. Describe a variety of application-specific algorithms (sorting/numerical/image processing) and associated data structures in common use, and discuss the benefits and limitations of parallelisation.

Indicative Content
1. Measuring performance
Basic techniques, sources of error [round off, range, instability, discretisation], profiling, analysing and presenting results
2. Parallel programming
Why to parallelise, Amdahl's law, high-level approaches to parallelisation, parallel design
3. Low-level programming with threads
Starting and joining threads, sharing data safely, mutual exclusion, synchronisation objects, lock-free
4. High-level parallel programming
Task-based parallelism, data-parallel problems, exploiting locality
5. Instruction-level parallelism
SIMD instructions, automatic vectorisation
6. GPGPU
GPU architectures, appropriate algorithms for GPUs, GPU profiling
7. Application case studies
Awareness of common sorting, numerical, image processing and searching and optimization algorithms (and associated data structures) and a recognition as to which are relevant for chosen field of study e.g. Spatial trees, pathfinding and AI, database indexing, password hashing, simulation, file carving] and which can benefit from parallelisation.

CMP209 Description

This module examines the basic technology and techniques used to investigate cybercrime. A systematic approach to planning and implementing a comprehensive computer forensic investigation is introduced with a particular focus on evidence collection and the reconstruction of events therefrom.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to carry out computer forensic investigations and appraise forensic software with a view to develop appropriate investigation strategies in the light of emerging digital technologies.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand the principles of computer forensic investigation with regard to the legal definitions of computer misuse.
2. Devise an appropriate professional level plan for a forensic investigation and carry out this plan within a context of a specific scenario.
3. Analyse and evaluate the results of a computer forensic investigation.

Indicative Content
1. Computer Crime
Types of computer crime; legislation concerning computer crime.
2. Use of Linux as an investigative environment
Familiarisation with the command-line interface
3. File Systems as a source of forensic evidence
Structure of NTFS, FAT, FAT32, and Linux file systems.
4. Data Acquisition
Procedures for acquiring disk images; collection of evidence from crime scenes, integrity of evidence, write blockers
5. Computer Forensics Tools
Command line tools; Linux tools; Windows tools.
6. Computer Forensic Analysis
Digital forensic toolkits; data hiding techniques; anti-forensics
7. Internet History and Email
Identifying email and browser-derived evidence; examining email headers; using specialist email forensic tools; examining browser histories and cookies.
8. Working with MS-Windows Systems
File system; investigation of the Registry; recovering deleted files; working with forensic boot disks.
9. Computer Forensics Analysis
Methodologies for forensic analysis of systems and the assessment of results. Memory forensics
10. Reporting Results of Investigations
Importance of reports; time-lines; designing the layout of a report.

 

 

CMP309 Description

This module develops a critical understanding of software development practices which can be used to develop applications for a range of mobile devices. Students will develop and evaluate the techniques used to implement mobile applications.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the ability to design, develop and critically evaluate software for the mobile platform.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Design and implement mobile software incorporating appropriate UI design for multi-device applications using native frameworks and libraries;
2. Discuss the devices, designs and languages relevant to smart and mobile operating systems;
3. Use network programming constructs including sockets and protocols to include security, location and privacy functionality in mobile applications;
4. Critically appraise usability and accessibility in mobile applications, identifying and exemplifying good practice.

Indicative Content
1. Background to Smart and Mobile Development:
Challenges and limitations in developing for mobile devices. Development strategies, emulators and development environments. Use of the application abstraction to allow easier development.
2. User Interfaces:
Development of interfaces for user-interaction including UI controls (buttons, forms) and underlying hardware controls (key presses, touch screen). Basic control of a mobile device using the high-level user interface. Use of commands and forms to gain data from the client. Use of low-level features to display data to the user. Use of key presses to control real-time application.
3. Storage:
Consideration of storage requirements for mobile devices. Saving and retrieving local and remote storage. Overview of database design. Use of remote databases, and how to use server-side databases in an internet application. Use of internet-based scripting to generate server-side text for the client.
4. Location awareness
Utilising the network location capabilities of mobile devices to develop feature rich applications.
5. Telephony SMS
Understanding the telephony and SMS stack on the mobile device and the use of API’s required for their access and control.
6. Communication Networks
Using short and long-distance networks for communication and understanding of the limitations and benefits of each.
7. Security
Consider the security implications of mobile and smart platforms, how these can be exploited and development considerations to improve resilience.
8. Performance
Methods for testing the functionality and performance of applications on mobile devices.
9. Mobile Web Application Development
Explore and evaluate a range of mobile solution options from response design, Firebase-, and JavaScript-based applications.

CMP320 Description

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the broad subject area of binary auditing. The student will also gain an understanding of the countermeasures that a company can take to minimise the effect of vulnerabilities.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse and critically evaluate techniques used to exploit binary files and identify relevant countermeasures.
2. Examine a topic in binary auditing and report the findings.
3. Demonstrate a critical evaluation of an advanced security topic with an independent project.

Indicative Content
1. Binary auditing tools
Binary auditing tools. Debuggers, add-ons, debugging techniques.
2. Binary auditing
Binary auditing. Source code auditing, Black box auditing, Reverse engineering auditing, Copy protection auditing.
3. Buffer Overflows
Significance of Buffer Overflow Vulnerability, Why Programs and Applications are Vulnerable. Reasons for Buffer Overflow Attacks. Methods of ensuring that buffer overflows are trapped.
4. Shell code development
Shell code development. Creating and writing shellcode.
5. Structured Exception Handling
Structured Exception Handling (SEH) vulnerabilities. Exploitation and countermeasures.
6. Overcoming operating system countermeasures. Avoiding Data Execution Prevention (DEP). Address Space Randomisation Layout (ASLR) evasion using ROP chains.
7. Heap Spray Techniques
Heap Spray Techniques. Use of Heap Spraying to avoid countermeasures.
8. Malware analysis
Types of malware, malware analysis methodology. Static and Dynamic analysis.

 

CMP311 Description

This module involves completing a team based development project or other technical investigation project, which was planned and initially developed in CMP308 (Software Project Management). The nature of the project will be relevant to the programme studied by the student.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the opportunity to develop a product or technical solution by applying design, development and evaluation principles in a team environment; the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a team and in interaction with project stakeholders.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Select and use appropriate project management techniques and tools to design, implement, test and evaluate a product
2. Contribute effectively to presentation and communication activities including demonstrating the developed product to stakeholders in a client pitch and project report
3. Work effectively within a team and critically appraise the individual contribution

Indicative Content
1. Orientation
Consolidation of project teams and target problem
2. Project principles
Required development methodologies during product production
3. Documentation
The importance and content of a requirements specification and related documentation
4. Design
The role of design and redesign during project development
5. Implementation
Implementation issues and approaches
6. Quality and Standards
Testing and evaluation methods and execution.
7. Communication
Oral and written communication and demonstration of software product
8. Project planning and team working
Planning the project, organising a team, supporting colleagues, devising weekly plans, keeping progress records
9. Self−evaluation
Personal contribution to team progress, logbook

Computer Games Technology - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Computer Games Technology course.

Module 1: CMP201 Data Structures and Algorithms 1

Module 2: MAT201 Applied Mathematics 2

Module 3: CMP203 Graphics Programming

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Computer Games Technology course.

Module 1: CMP301 Graphics Programming with Shaders

Module 2: CMP303 Network Systems for Game Development

Module 3: CMP305 Procedural Methods

CMP201 Description

Building on students' knowledge of programming facilities taught in Level 7 programming modules (e.g. arrays, structures, simple collections), this module introduces the standard data structures and algorithms that form the core of algorithmic thought in computer science, and introduces students to the idea of reasoning about the behaviour and performance of a computer program.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : To familiarise students with the standard data structures and algorithms that underpin software design and development.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe abstract and concrete requirements for data structures and algorithms.
2. Describe a range of standard data structures and algorithms, in terms of both functionality and performance characteristics.
3. By reasoning about behaviour and performance, be able to critically select appropriate data structures and algorithms for a given application within a software project.

Indicative Content
1. Reasoning about performance
The idea of an algorithm, time and space complexity, abstract data types
2. Basic data structures
Linked lists, stacks, queues, hash tables
3. Sorting and searching
Exhaustive and binary search, common sorting algorithms
4. Trees
Simple trees, tree search algorithms, tree representations (XML, JSON)
5. Graphs
Simple and directed graphs, graph algorithms

MAT201 Description

This module expands on the concepts of Applied Mathematics 1, on applied mathematics relevant to the Computer Games Technology programme.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: an appreciation of the advanced ideas and techniques in applied mathematics relevant to Computer Games Technology.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Use calculus methods to describe/approximate surfaces and to solve optimisation problems.
2. Use the ideas of homogeneous coordinate matrix transformations and quaternions for 3D rotations in computer graphics applications.
3. Use the rays and beams in the modelling of reflection, refraction and collision detection with regular shapes.
4. Solve problems in 1D involving variable acceleration and resistance.
5. Solve problems in 2D, including circular and simple harmonic motion; and elastic collisions.

Indicative Content
1. Calculus - First and second order partial differentiation. Extrema of two variable functions.
2. Matrix and Quaternion Transformations - 3D matrix transformations: translation, scaling, rotation and reflection. Parallel and perspective projections. Complex numbers. Quaternions and their application to rotations about an axis.
3. Vector Curves and Surfaces - Vector geometry of curves and surfaces in space. Tangent planes and normals.
4. Ray Tracing - Intersection of rays with 3D surfaces. Tracing reflected and refracted rays of light in 3D using vectors.
5. Dynamics - Variable velocity and acceleration. Straight−line dynamics with variable forces (e.g. dependent on speed). Circular motion, simple harmonic motion. Oblique impact of objects in 2D.

CMP203 Description

This module provides an introduction to the principles of 3D graphics programming. Students will develop application that demonstrates real-time 3D graphics.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : Introduce the concepts and features of an API for polygon based rendering. Consolidate knowledge of vector/matrix algebra with programming skills.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate the fundamentals of 3D computer graphics.
2. Design and develop real-time 3D graphics applications.
3. Describe and explain 3D graphics techniques.

Indicative Content
1. The graphics pipeline - Hardware and software functionality and performance.
2. Graphical Primitives - Points, lines and polygons.
3. Coordinate systems - Transformation, projection and hierarchical transforms.
4. Geometry ordering - Depth sorting, Z-buffering and blending.
5. Lighting - Types of lights and related calculations.
6. Texturing - Applying 2D image data to 3D objects.
7. Model processing - Loading and rendering geometry from an external source.
8. Data storage - Techniques for generating and storing 3D geometry data.

CMP301 Description

This module develops a critical understanding of the computer graphics programmable pipeline and various graphics techniques. Students will develop and evaluate techniques used to manipulate 3D graphics in real-time.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the knowledge and core techniques necessary for creating real-time 3D graphics applications utilising the programmable pipeline.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Develop custom shaders.
2. Design and develop real-time 3D graphics applications, demonstrating use of the programmable pipeline.
3. Evaluate graphics programming techniques utilised.

Indicative Content
1. Graphics programming - Introduction to the graphics programmable pipeline
2. Shaders - Creation and use of shaders within the context of the programmable pipeline.
3. Development - Develop applications and shaders which include topics such as lighting, vertex manipulation, post processing and tessellation.

CMP303 Description

Working within a team, students will learn about project management concepts that enable them to create a project proposal in a professional manner and present their work in a client pitch to a stakeholder. The project briefs are drawn from current industry and/or research based problem areas. Students are expected to engage fully in their team role and are thus expected to communicate effectively with project stakeholders, contribute to the planning of the project, develop artefacts or prototypes, write associated documentation, and create and present the client pitch.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the students with the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a team and in interaction with project stakeholders, and understand principles of project management.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate and select appropriate project management techniques and investigation frameworks to create a project plan for an investigative or development project related to the student's course of study
2. Develop a prototype or artefact related to the student's course of study
3. Develop teamwork and communication skills through team collaboration on a project proposal and client pitch

Indicative Content
1. Research
Research: Background, competitors, prior art, project benefits
2. Project
Project management concepts, Agile, Scrum
3. Activities
Activities, deliverables and products
4. Managing
Managing time and resources
5. Identifying
Identifying and managing risks
6. Quality considerations
Professional standards and quality assurance
7. Develop
Develop artefacts, prototypes
8. Interacting
Interacting with clients and team members

CMP305 Description

This module develops an understanding of various techniques used to generate procedural content in games, tools and common media editing packages to a cutting-edge standard. In addition to this students are also taught further graphics, games and general programming techniques and practices.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the knowledge to create and correctly apply procedural techniques to solve problems in computer graphics and content generation pipelines.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically evaluate Procedural techniques for use in game and tool development.
2. Describe and implement advanced 3D graphics effects.
3. Develop a 3D graphics application containing procedural content generation and advanced graphics effects.

Indicative Content
1. Background to procedural content generation:
History of procedural effects in games and CGI with modern day context and application.
2. Random Procedural Techniques:
Overview and evaluation of basic random generation techniques with applicability for terrain generation.
3. Perlin Noise:
Review and evaluation of Perlin noise as the cornerstone of advanced procedural generation techniques and a ubiquitous technology in the film and game industry.
4. Advanced Deterministic Procedural Techniques:
Overview of Fractals and Fractal techniques as a basis. Review and evaluation of Fractal based techniques such as fractional Brownian motion derived from Perlin noise with application in terrain generation and beyond.
5. Procedural Animation:
Review and evaluate methods procedural animation of objects in runtime and overview of current technologies used in advanced simulation and destruction.
6. Overview of growth systems for modelling objects such as plants and other similar procedural structures.
7. Dungeons and Level Generation:
Critically review techniques applied to creation of other procedural assets such as methods for creating dungeons and other common game content.

Computer Games Technology - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Computer Games Technology course.

Module 1: CMP202 Data Structures and Algorithms 2

Module 2: CMP208 Game Programming and System Architectures

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Computer Games Technology course.

Module 1: MAT301 Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence

Module 2: DES310 Professional Project - 40 credits (TBC)

CMP202 Description

This module builds on Data Structures and Algorithms 1 by introducing students to some of the practical performance concerns in the selection and implementation of parallel algorithms, using a range of case studies drawn from typical real-world applications.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : To develop computational and algorithmic thinking and show how data structures and algorithms are used efficiently in real-world applications.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Be aware of the standard techniques of software performance measurement, including profiling, and apply these techniques to identify performance bottlenecks in real programs.
2. Understand the emerging importance of parallel programming in modern software development, and experiment with the performance impact of parallelising parts of an application.
3. Describe a variety of application-specific algorithms (sorting/numerical/image processing) and associated data structures in common use, and discuss the benefits and limitations of parallelisation.

Indicative Content
1. Measuring performance
Basic techniques, sources of error [round off, range, instability, discretisation], profiling, analysing and presenting results
2. Parallel programming
Why to parallelise, Amdahl's law, high-level approaches to parallelisation, parallel design
3. Low-level programming with threads
Starting and joining threads, sharing data safely, mutual exclusion, synchronisation objects, lock-free
4. High-level parallel programming
Task-based parallelism, data-parallel problems, exploiting locality
5. Instruction-level parallelism
SIMD instructions, automatic vectorisation
6. GPGPU
GPU architectures, appropriate algorithms for GPUs, GPU profiling
7. Application case studies
Awareness of common sorting, numerical, image processing and searching and optimization algorithms (and associated data structures) and a recognition as to which are relevant for chosen field of study e.g. Spatial trees, pathfinding and AI, database indexing, password hashing, simulation, file carving] and which can benefit from parallelisation.

CMP208 Description

This module builds on Graphics Programming, Data Structures and Algorithms 1 and Computer Architecture and introduces the necessary components needed to develop a 3D physics-based game application considering the hardware.

Aims
To enable students to integrate various components (3D graphics, physics, audio) and to develop a 3D game application that makes effective use of modern computer/console systems

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe 3D graphics, audio and physics functionality within a 3D games application .
2. Implement key game components - 3D graphics, audio, gameplay and physics on games console hardware.
3. Design, implement and evaluate applications that demonstrate enhanced performance in relation to device hardware e.g. multithreading

Indicative Content
1. Games Hardware (Introduction to Consoles)
Device Memory and CPU/GPU architecture characteristics - Cache architectures, locality, alignment, virtual memory, memory allocation techniques, CPU/GPU architecture: Pipelines, superscalar architectures, branch prediction, out-of-order execution, hyperthreading, multicore, NUMA
2. User Interfaces
Methods to exploit touchscreen and controller pads user inputs.
3. Audio Engines
3D positional audio – considering the position, orientation and velocity of the listener and the position, orientation and velocity of the emitter.
4. Physics Engines
Collision detection, Rigid Body Dynamics using Box2D
5. Character Animation
Types of character animation and techniques of character animation
6. Putting it all together – How – where to parallelise recognising console architecture
7. Multithreading
Cross referencing Memory architecture and CPU architecture

 

MAT301 Description

This module builds on the ideas of MAT201 to comprise a more advanced study of mathematical methods and models relevant to Computer Games Technology, and introduces some of the many Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques which are currently, or could in the near future, be used to enhance the development of applications in video games, or other entertainment related products. These AI techniques can enhance the immersive properties of a game by enabling ‘realistic’ and ‘believable’ game play and character actions, or used to reduce development time by automatically creating content, etc.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with an appreciation of the advanced mathematical methods required in the study of Computer Games Technology and introduce the underlying techniques used in video games to create the illusion of ‘intelligence’, as well as some real AI techniques which are, or could be, used to enhance the development of these Game AI methods.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Model and solve more advanced problems in rigid body and 2-dimensional particle dynamics.
2. Use numerical methods to solve equations.
3. Develop a critical understanding of AI techniques and technologies.
4. Evaluate the use of AI technologies and techniques in computer games.

Indicative Content
1. Numerical Methods: Numerical methods for integration (trapezium and Simpson’s rules) and the solution of equations by simple iteration and the Newton-Raphson method. Numerical solution of DE’s, e.g. Euler, predictor/corrector methods (Euler/trapezium/Simpson), Verlet, Runge-Kutta.
2. Motion of a Rigid Body: Centroids and moments of inertia of simple bodies, parallel and perpendicular axis theorems. Rotation of a rigid body about an axis, energy, angular momentum. Rolling and sliding motion. 
3. An Introduction to AI for Games: The importance of good game AI. The differences between Game AI and so called ‘real’ Academic AI and their relative advantages and disadvantages. 
4. ‘Traditional’ Game AI: Rule Based Systems, Finite State Machines.
5. Academic AI Techniques: Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy State Machines, Case Based Reasoning, Genetic Algorithms, Reinforcement Learning, Probabalistic Techniques, Artificial Neural Networks, Clustering Algorithms.
6. The use of AI in Games: Combining AI techniques to produce A-life and Intelligent Agents. The future of AI in games.

 

DES310 Description

For this module, students will be required to work together on an interactive media project as part of a multidisciplinary team. Individual students will be expected to contribute to their team by taking on a professional role suited to their area of study. As part of the module, all students will be expected to: communicate with clients and relevant stakeholders; participate in pitching and presentations; research and test technical pipelines; create project documentation and planning materials; and contribute to the iterative design and development of a final interactive prototype.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a multidisciplinary development team, contributing to planning, presenting, prototyping, and production.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Contribute to the development, testing, enhancement, and completion of a defined interactive media project
2. Demonstrate the ability to fulfil and appraise their own defined professional role within a team, evaluating their contribution in relation to expectations of the comparable role in industry
3. Demonstrate teamwork, communication, and professionalism through collaboration on- and delivery of- a team project

Indicative Content
1. Team Organisation and Management - Attend and participate in team meetings, keep meeting minutes, and assign roles and responsibilities; Identify and overcome team problems, understand conflicts and approaches to conflict resolution, and engage with team building.
2. Communication and Professionalism - Demonstrate the ability to communicate within the team, with tutors, with clients/mentors, and with other stakeholders in a professional and respectful manner.
3. Development Methodologies - Understand and apply appropriate development methodologies framed by the requirements of a project and balance of a team, e.g. agile, scrum, lean, spiral, feature-driven, waterfall/traditional.
4. Research and Concept Development - Research similar products and competitors; Research and interpret the product marketplace, considering platform, user profiles, costs, regional differences etc; Conduct visual and audio research; Iteratively develop design concepts in response to a given brief.
5. Technologies and Pipelines - Research software and hardware technologies; Develop a technical plan for game development; Research, develop, test and document production pipelines.
6. Style and Branding - Develop a brand for the team and the project; Research, develop, document, and communicate a defined visual and audio style; Produce marketing and promotional materials.
7. Pitching and Presentation - Use appropriate software, hardware, game engines, and other tools to deliver a working digital prototype; Engage with regular user testing to inform design iteration, demonstrating an appreciation of user experience.
8. Prototype Development, Testing, and Iteration - Use appropriate software, hardware, game engines, and other tools to deliver a working digital prototype; Engage with regular user testing to inform design iteration, demonstrating an appreciation of user experience.
9. Release Management - Manage the software development process using source control, defect tracking, and build processes.
10. Project Delivery - Consider the methods for delivering products to the market, including market cycles, digital distribution, and the publisher-developer relationship; Deliver a complete prototype with accompanying press kit.

Computer Game Applications Development - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Computer Game Applications Development course.

Module 1: CMP201 Data Structures and Algorithms 1

Module 2: MAT202 Mathematics for Application Development 2

Module 3: CMP203 Graphics Programming

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Computer Game Applications Development course.

Module 1: CMP301 Graphics Programming with Shaders

Module 2: CMP303 Network Systems for Game Development

Module 3: CMP302 Gameplay Mechanics Development

CMP201 Description

Building on students' knowledge of programming facilities taught in Level 7 programming modules (e.g. arrays, structures, simple collections), this module introduces the standard data structures and algorithms that form the core of algorithmic thought in computer science, and introduces students to the idea of reasoning about the behaviour and performance of a computer program.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : To familiarise students with the standard data structures and algorithms that underpin software design and development.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe abstract and concrete requirements for data structures and algorithms.
2. Describe a range of standard data structures and algorithms, in terms of both functionality and performance characteristics.
3. By reasoning about behaviour and performance, be able to critically select appropriate data structures and algorithms for a given application within a software project.

Indicative Content
1. Reasoning about performance
The idea of an algorithm, time and space complexity, abstract data types
2. Basic data structures
Linked lists, stacks, queues, hash tables
3. Sorting and searching
Exhaustive and binary search, common sorting algorithms
4. Trees
Simple trees, tree search algorithms, tree representations (XML, JSON)
5. Graphs
Simple and directed graphs, graph algorithms

MAT202 Description

This module builds on Mathematics for Application Development 1 to give CGAD students the mathematical building blocks required for 3-D graphics programming.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the necessary mathematical tools for programming 3-D object characterisations in computer graphics.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Formulate and use transformation matrices (2-D & 3-D) for standard transformations and projections.
2. Determine equations for lines and planes in 3-D, using them to compute distances, projections and intersections.
3. Perform collision detection calculations of rays with boxes and spheres.
4. Apply Newtonian concepts involving momentum, impulse and energy to formulate and solve resulting models.

Indicative Content
1. Viewing Transformations: 2-D viewing transformation matrices, scaling factors, aspect ratios, windows, normalised device screen, viewports.
2. Lines and Planes: Vector (using parameters) and Cartesian equations of 3-D lines and planes. Distances from points to lines and planes. Projection of line onto a plane, intersection of lines and planes.
3. Matrix Transformations: 3-D matrix transformations of scaling, rotation, reflection and translation (homogeneous coordinates). Composite transformation by matrix multiplication.
4. Projection Matrices: Standard orthogonal and perspective matrix transformations.
5. Ray Tracing: Collision detection methods of rays with boxes and spheres.
6. Newtonian Concepts: Newton’s laws of motion. Momentum and impulse, collision of bodies (1-dimensional, elastic and inelastic). Kinetic and potential energy, elastic strings. Work and Power.

CMP203 Description

This module provides an introduction to the principles of 3D graphics programming. Students will develop application that demonstrates real-time 3D graphics.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : Introduce the concepts and features of an API for polygon based rendering. Consolidate knowledge of vector/matrix algebra with programming skills.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate the fundamentals of 3D computer graphics.
2. Design and develop real-time 3D graphics applications.
3. Describe and explain 3D graphics techniques.

Indicative Content
1. The graphics pipeline - Hardware and software functionality and performance.
2. Graphical Primitives - Points, lines and polygons.
3. Coordinate systems - Transformation, projection and hierarchical transforms.
4. Geometry ordering - Depth sorting, Z-buffering and blending.
5. Lighting - Types of lights and related calculations.
6. Texturing - Applying 2D image data to 3D objects.
7. Model processing - Loading and rendering geometry from an external source.
8. Data storage - Techniques for generating and storing 3D geometry data.

CMP301 Description

This module develops a critical understanding of the computer graphics programmable pipeline and various graphics techniques. Students will develop and evaluate techniques used to manipulate 3D graphics in real-time.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the knowledge and core techniques necessary for creating real-time 3D graphics applications utilising the programmable pipeline.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Develop custom shaders.
2. Design and develop real-time 3D graphics applications, demonstrating use of the programmable pipeline.
3. Evaluate graphics programming techniques utilised.

Indicative Content
1. Graphics programming - Introduction to the graphics programmable pipeline
2. Shaders - Creation and use of shaders within the context of the programmable pipeline.
3. Development - Develop applications and shaders which include topics such as lighting, vertex manipulation, post processing and tessellation.

CMP303 Description

Working within a team, students will learn about project management concepts that enable them to create a project proposal in a professional manner and present their work in a client pitch to a stakeholder. The project briefs are drawn from current industry and/or research based problem areas. Students are expected to engage fully in their team role and are thus expected to communicate effectively with project stakeholders, contribute to the planning of the project, develop artefacts or prototypes, write associated documentation, and create and present the client pitch.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the students with the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a team and in interaction with project stakeholders, and understand principles of project management.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Evaluate and select appropriate project management techniques and investigation frameworks to create a project plan for an investigative or development project related to the student's course of study
2. Develop a prototype or artefact related to the student's course of study
3. Develop teamwork and communication skills through team collaboration on a project proposal and client pitch

Indicative Content
1. Research
Research: Background, competitors, prior art, project benefits
2. Project
Project management concepts, Agile, Scrum
3. Activities
Activities, deliverables and products
4. Managing
Managing time and resources
5. Identifying
Identifying and managing risks
6. Quality considerations
Professional standards and quality assurance
7. Develop
Develop artefacts, prototypes
8. Interacting
Interacting with clients and team members

CMP302 Description

This module develops a critical understanding of the principles of formalising, implementing, testing and iterating on functional game mechanics applied in the context of a game engine.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with: the ability to move from a designed mechanic to creating a finalised implementation. The module will also cover creating statistics from mechanics and play to aid in the iterative design and balance process.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Create and evaluate code design extrapolated from design documentation.
2. Implement functionality within a game engine with testing, metrics and iteration in mind.
3. Design, develop and critically evaluate a complex game mechanic within a games application.

Indicative Content
1. Modern game functionality programming: Review of modern game development with regards to use of game engines and the various methods and levels that game functionality can be implemented.
2. Aspects of Game Design: Theoretical and practical aspects of the game design process derived from established conventions. Analyse a game system from a game theoretical perspective and construction and upkeep of related documentation.
3. From Design to Function: Design interpretation and extrapolation. The process of going from written design to design suitable for engine implementation. Alignment and consideration for correct game engine OO standards. In scripting/visual scripting as well as code.
4. Maintainable Design: Review and evaluation of the aspects of game functionality development relevant to the iteration and evolution of game mechanics and how this integrates with other personnel in the development team.
5. Hardware Integration: Dealing with hardware integration and aligning hardware to work with a game engine and specific game functionality.
6. Data logging, debugging and testing gameplay. Practices and Specifics related to gameplay functionality.
7. Numerical analysis and data for game balancing: Review and evaluation of mathematical techniques and their application to aid in the balancing of gameplay parameters.

Computer Game Applications Development - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BSc Computer Game Applications Development course.

Module 1: CMP202 Data Structures and Algorithms 2

Module 2: CMP208 Game Programming and System Architectures

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BSc Computer Game Applications Development course.

Module 1: CMP304 Artificial Intelligence

Module 2: DES310 Professional Project - 40 credits (TBC)

CMP202 Description

This module builds on Data Structures and Algorithms 1 by introducing students to some of the practical performance concerns in the selection and implementation of parallel algorithms, using a range of case studies drawn from typical real-world applications.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with : To develop computational and algorithmic thinking and show how data structures and algorithms are used efficiently in real-world applications.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Be aware of the standard techniques of software performance measurement, including profiling, and apply these techniques to identify performance bottlenecks in real programs.
2. Understand the emerging importance of parallel programming in modern software development, and experiment with the performance impact of parallelising parts of an application.
3. Describe a variety of application-specific algorithms (sorting/numerical/image processing) and associated data structures in common use, and discuss the benefits and limitations of parallelisation.

Indicative Content
1. Measuring performance
Basic techniques, sources of error [round off, range, instability, discretisation], profiling, analysing and presenting results
2. Parallel programming
Why to parallelise, Amdahl's law, high-level approaches to parallelisation, parallel design
3. Low-level programming with threads
Starting and joining threads, sharing data safely, mutual exclusion, synchronisation objects, lock-free
4. High-level parallel programming
Task-based parallelism, data-parallel problems, exploiting locality
5. Instruction-level parallelism
SIMD instructions, automatic vectorisation
6. GPGPU
GPU architectures, appropriate algorithms for GPUs, GPU profiling
7. Application case studies
Awareness of common sorting, numerical, image processing and searching and optimization algorithms (and associated data structures) and a recognition as to which are relevant for chosen field of study e.g. Spatial trees, pathfinding and AI, database indexing, password hashing, simulation, file carving] and which can benefit from parallelisation.

CMP208 Description

This module builds on Graphics Programming, Data Structures and Algorithms 1 and Computer Architecture and introduces the necessary components needed to develop a 3D physics-based game application considering the hardware.

Aims
To enable students to integrate various components (3D graphics, physics, audio) and to develop a 3D game application that makes effective use of modern computer/console systems

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe 3D graphics, audio and physics functionality within a 3D games application .
2. Implement key game components - 3D graphics, audio, gameplay and physics on games console hardware.
3. Design, implement and evaluate applications that demonstrate enhanced performance in relation to device hardware e.g. multithreading

Indicative Content
1. Games Hardware (Introduction to Consoles)
Device Memory and CPU/GPU architecture characteristics - Cache architectures, locality, alignment, virtual memory, memory allocation techniques, CPU/GPU architecture: Pipelines, superscalar architectures, branch prediction, out-of-order execution, hyperthreading, multicore, NUMA
2. User Interfaces
Methods to exploit touchscreen and controller pads user inputs.
3. Audio Engines
3D positional audio – considering the position, orientation and velocity of the listener and the position, orientation and velocity of the emitter.
4. Physics Engines
Collision detection, Rigid Body Dynamics using Box2D
5. Character Animation
Types of character animation and techniques of character animation
6. Putting it all together – How – where to parallelise recognising console architecture
7. Multithreading
Cross referencing Memory architecture and CPU architecture

CMP304 Description

This module provides an introduction to some of the many Artificial Intelligence techniques which are currently, or could in the near future, be used to enhance the development of intelligent systems applied to various application domains.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with knowledge of how artificial intelligence techniques can be used effectively within an application environment to provide intelligence and/or the illusion of intelligence.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically examine various artificial intelligence techniques.
2. Develop a critical understanding of AI techniques and technologies.
3. Evaluate the use of AI technologies and techniques for specific purposes.

Indicative Content
1. ‘Traditional’ AI: Rule Based Systems, Finite State Machines.
2. Academic AI Techniques: Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy State Machines, Case Basde Reasoning, Genetic Algorithms, Reinforcement Learning, Probibalistic Techniques, Artificial Neural Networks, Clustering Algorithms.
3. Applications of AI: Combining AI techniques to produce A-life and Intelligent Agents.
4. Machine Learning: The ability of a machine to learn from its environment
5. Mining: Knowledge discovery and the process of finding hidden patterns in data
6. Big Data: The challenge of the 21st century is ‘too much data and not enough analysis’. Explore the challenges and opportunities afforded by this phenomenon.
7. Intelligence on the Internet: Analyse the emergence of intelligent agents on the internet.

DES310 Description

For this module, students will be required to work together on an interactive media project as part of a multidisciplinary team. Individual students will be expected to contribute to their team by taking on a professional role suited to their area of study. As part of the module, all students will be expected to: communicate with clients and relevant stakeholders; participate in pitching and presentations; research and test technical pipelines; create project documentation and planning materials; and contribute to the iterative design and development of a final interactive prototype.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a multidisciplinary development team, contributing to planning, presenting, prototyping, and production.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Contribute to the development, testing, enhancement, and completion of a defined interactive media project
2. Demonstrate the ability to fulfil and appraise their own defined professional role within a team, evaluating their contribution in relation to expectations of the comparable role in industry
3. Demonstrate teamwork, communication, and professionalism through collaboration on- and delivery of- a team project

Indicative Content
1. Team Organisation and Management - Attend and participate in team meetings, keep meeting minutes, and assign roles and responsibilities; Identify and overcome team problems, understand conflicts and approaches to conflict resolution, and engage with team building.
2. Communication and Professionalism - Demonstrate the ability to communicate within the team, with tutors, with clients/mentors, and with other stakeholders in a professional and respectful manner.
3. Development Methodologies - Understand and apply appropriate development methodologies framed by the requirements of a project and balance of a team, e.g. agile, scrum, lean, spiral, feature-driven, waterfall/traditional.
4. Research and Concept Development - Research similar products and competitors; Research and interpret the product marketplace, considering platform, user profiles, costs, regional differences etc; Conduct visual and audio research; Iteratively develop design concepts in response to a given brief.
5. Technologies and Pipelines - Research software and hardware technologies; Develop a technical plan for game development; Research, develop, test and document production pipelines.
6. Style and Branding - Develop a brand for the team and the project; Research, develop, document, and communicate a defined visual and audio style; Produce marketing and promotional materials.
7. Pitching and Presentation - Use appropriate software, hardware, game engines, and other tools to deliver a working digital prototype; Engage with regular user testing to inform design iteration, demonstrating an appreciation of user experience.
8. Prototype Development, Testing, and Iteration - Use appropriate software, hardware, game engines, and other tools to deliver a working digital prototype; Engage with regular user testing to inform design iteration, demonstrating an appreciation of user experience.
9. Release Management - Manage the software development process using source control, defect tracking, and build processes.
10. Project Delivery - Consider the methods for delivering products to the market, including market cycles, digital distribution, and the publisher-developer relationship; Deliver a complete prototype with accompanying press kit.

Computer Arts - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Computer Arts course.

Module 1: ART202 3D Production Methods

Module 2: ART203 Digital Media Contexts

Module 3: ART204 Digital Concept Visualisation

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Computer Arts course.

Module 1: ART308 Critical Studies

For modules 2 & 3, choose one of the following pairs of modules:

ART303 Technical Art Application ART305 Cinematic Animation

ART307 Information Design ART309 Visual Design

DES306 Environment Art Production & DES307 Character Art Production

AUD311 Sound and Music for Games & AUD312 Game Audio Implementation

ART202 Description

This module develops abilities and awareness within the field of 3D art asset creation, and in doing so equips students to develop their own strategies for independent learning within this broad subject area.

Aims     
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to identify and utilise appropriate 3D techniques and processes in the creation of artefacts for Games, Illustration, Animation, Digital Media and 3D Prints.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Discover and explore the opportunities, terminologies and techniques offered by 3D Digital modelling, rendering software and advanced technologies.
2. Create 3D digital assets for specific underlying developmental and artistic goals.
3. Scrutinise the use of 3D Production methods and technologies in the development of narrative concepts.
4. Dissect environmental, architectural and product design inspiration to enhance the authenticity and inform the creation of virtual environments.
5. Develop a broad awareness of any future technologies and developments that are likely to present opportunities for innovation, or otherwise impact on their own practice.

Indicative Content
1. Polygon Modelling - Core Polygon modelling techniques for the creation of digital artefacts.
2. Digital Sculpting - Core Sculpting techniques for the creation of digital artefacts. Core NURBS modelling techniques for the creation of digital or analogue artefacts.
3. Textures and materials - The use of textures and materials for specific processes and goals.
4. Lighting and Camera implementation - Explanation of the properties of light and lighting/camera set-up
5. Virtual Environments - Creation of 3D environments, displaying an awareness of form, function and design.
6. Implementation - Implementation and application of 3D processes within the development and realisation of creativity, conceptualisation and imagination.
7. Technologies - The new and evolving technologies in this discipline, and the manner in which they affect practice.
8. Interpretation - Demonstrate visual analysis skills as they flow into visual interpretation.

ART203 Description

This module is designed to enhance students’ ability to identify and form a critical argument in relation to issues within their domain of practice.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with a set of academic tools with which they can analyse, and evaluate issues, trends and work which sits within their area of practice in order to be able to form and disseminate a critical argument

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Understand art media histories and their impact upon traditions of creative practice.
2. Interpret the political, social, and economic context of chosen practice and practitioners.
3. Form strategies of understanding and apply tools for critique of the chosen domain.
4. Disseminate critical argument appropriate to the subject domain.

Indicative Content
1. Historical Traditions of Creative Practice - Through a series of presentations, historical snapshots will be analysed which discuss the traditions of fields of practice, identifying key practitioners of the time and key works.
2. Creative Work in Context - The study of creative works and the ways in which the environmental, political, social and economic context within which it was created can be seen to influence the final form and its reception
3. Histories of Related Problems - Through the identification of a specific area of interest, problems surrounding a historical practitioner will be explored and used as a tool to understand the practice and final work of the individual.
4. Art Media History and Current Practices - In relation to a specific area of interest, connections will be built between historical practices and current trends in art and media production.
5. Forming Critical Arguments - Analysis of academic writing around the field of practice will form a case study to allow students to enhance their understanding of critical argument creation.
6. Literature and Critical Arguments - Explore related literature and its role in supporting academic critique.
7. Dissemination Practices - Traditions and new forms of academic practice will be explored to not only inform research but also the final form of students’ coursework.

ART204 Description

The focus of this module is to develop an understanding of the artistic and technical processes deployed in the field of concept art and production design for entertainment (computer games, film, comics or animation, etc.). Students will explore their field through visual research, observational and digital concept design skills, employing industry standard applications to aid their creative process. Students will produce a portfolio of evidence which exhibits a firm grasp of two dimensional digital production methods through conceptual and practical skills development

Aims
Equip the students with knowledge and skills for visualising concepts relevant to 2D production design the wider entertainment industry.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Employ visual research skills deliberating new ideas from observation and study of fundamental art theory and practices in 2D imagery
2. Develop an understanding of domain of practice including history, seminal figures and current trends and examine relationships to personal conceptual and technical development
3. Utilise industry standard processes and software packages to demonstrate an ability to form and adhere to a relevant concept design pipeline, from initial ideas to completed concept.

Indicative Content
1. Visual Research - Targeted visual research methods appropriate to concept design, building reliable resources via image gathering, scrapbooks, blogs or sketchbooks, online/offline sources, etc.
2. Observational Drawing - Drawing from life, expanding beyond reality, concepts grounded in real world scenarios, proving fantastical ideas.
3. Concept Incubation - Idea generation, photo collage, sketching, concept development, mood-boarding, thumbnailing, iteration, variation.
4. Defining the Domain of Practice - Explore key figures and current trends; historical grounding for genre, cliché, archetype and representation. Evaluating examples of entertainment design for creature, character, vehicle, industrial, product, environment, graphic design
5. Concept Development - Design drawing, digital painting, 3D layout and sculpting for 2D design, digitising real world sources.
6. Working Pipe-line - Identify and assess design problems, identifying creative software solutions, employ an effective design pipeline framework.
7. Artefact creation - Layout design considerations of concept images for effective presentation of completed work for print, pitching, clients, presentation, etc.

ART308 Description

This module is designed to enhance students’ ability to set theoretical and critical frameworks to underpin specialist writing within their domain of practice.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the skills and knowledge to enhance their understanding of their field through theoretical and critical underpinning of their academic writing.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Analyse and interpret professional and published work in relation to research practice
2. Break academic and creative work into component parts in order to analyse the concerns, methods and context of the chosen work
3. Apply appropriate critical frameworks to the analysis of issues, academic arguments and/or creative practice
4. Relate findings of analysis to the motivations behind their own creative practice

Indicative Content
1. Contextual Analysis - Identify and critically analyse existing contextual materials in relation to the chosen area of research practice.
2. Critical Frameworks - Over a number of weeks, critical and theoretical frameworks will be explored in relation to subject specialisation. Students will explore and evaluate the appropriateness of techniques to their own area of interest
3. Deconstruction as an Analysis Technique - Identify and deconstruct existing artwork(s) interpreting the decisions made by the artist in relation to the context within which the work was made.
4. Identifying the Research Question - Explore these techniques in relation to own project, to uncover possible areas of practice-led research.
5. Positioning - Identify what other practitioners are doing in your chosen field and explain how your work is positioned/relates to theirs. What does your work add to the field?
6. The Post Mortem/Critical Reflection - Identify and apply reflective processes to the dissemination of the findings of the exploration.

ART303 Description

This module is designed to equip students with technical and practical skills in order to be able to design, produce and articulate digital characters and/or vehicles through the evaluation of creative and technical art problems across a range of disciplines.

Aims
The aim of this Module is to provide the student with an understanding of technical art practice and the ability to artistically and technically solve issues relating to the production of computer generated media

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to :
1. Identify, interpret and employ best practice workflow and production pipelines appropriate to the chosen field of specialisation.
2. Utilise real world research and creative process in the conception and preparation of 3D assets for animation purposes
3. Demonstrate an understanding of design decisions and workflow upon movement capabilities and articulation requirements
4. Utilise technical ability and creative problem solving in the production of stylistically and practically appropriate outcomes in relation to the project brief.

Indicative Content
1. Life and Observational Drawing: Explore anatomy and/or construction, movement and articulation in the organic and where appropriate, non-organic form and understand its application to three dimensional asset construction
2. Anatomical and Construction Studies: Review anatomy and construction of both real and fantasy character, creature and/or vehicle designs to inform creative process and practical outcomes.
3. Design processes and artist workflow: Research professional workflows and practices to inform and underpin the creative design and development process of artefacts for the project brief.
4. 3D Modelling for Articulation: Interpret and apply appropriate modelling techniques to facilitate movement required by the chosen design.
5. Digital Skeletal Structures and the Needs of the Animator: Research and develop a skeletal structure which will facilitate an appropriate range of motion to suit the design of the character/creature/vehicle and to meet the needs of the animator.
6. Develop an understanding of control hierarchies and apply these to create a user friendly control system. Understand the use of scripting to automate and support repetitive tasks in 3D software.
7. IK VS. FK for Animation purposes: Explore the application of kinematics systems and their impact upon the usability of a rig.
8. Automation and Driven Joint Articulation techniques: Examine the potential for automation within the rig to enhance usability. Apply appropriate techniques to meet the needs of the chosen design.
9. Vertex Driven Articulation Techniques: Examine the potential for vertex driven animation within the rig to enhance usability. Apply appropriate techniques to meet the needs of the chosen design.
10. Weight Painting and Deformation: Undertake weight painting and explore deformation techniques to create convincing deformation of geometry to meet the needs of the chosen design.

ART305 Description

This module is designed to enhance student’s conception of advanced art practices and time based animated sequences in relation to target audience, and their application of specialist animation techniques in a two or three dimensional animation sequence

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the knowledge, skills and understanding to conceive, develop and produce a sophisticated artefact or expressive animated piece

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Underpin creative practice with an understanding of the contextual, commercial, technological and creative issues in the chosen field of specialisation
2. Demonstrate the ability to iterate critique and evaluate the work throughout development and appropriately communicate concepts and/or ideas.
3. Utilise a range of traditional and/or digital techniques to conceive, develop and produce a sophisticated artefact or animation sequence

Indicative Content
1. Modularity in Construction - Undertake studies in mesh construction that increase efficiency and reflect industry best practices.
2. Surface look development - Examine and development techniques to produce versatile surface rendering using 3D painting, 2D texture inputs and baking workflows.
3. Physically Based Rendering - Investigate and practice physically based rendering principles in a variety of contexts grounded in established standards commonly practiced in leading industries.
4. Sculpting - Study 3d digital form creation and pipeline workflows and tools reflective of industry practice.
5. Advanced Animation Techniques - Analyse theories relating to expression, including facial expression, body language and gesture. Interpret the relationship between these elements and verbal communication within animation examples.
6. Experimental Animation: Movement and Expression - Critically evaluate experimental animations which utilise movement, colour, and sound to express themes and ideas to a viewer. Interpret meaning and explore the application of such techniques in own work.

ART307 Description

In this module students will develop their knowledge and understanding of information design. The module will give students a practical foundation and theoretical overview of the visualization process, and practice of designing and presenting information in a way that fosters efficient and effective understanding.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide learners with conceptual skills and applicable practices to conceptualize, compose, develop and refine effective means of information communication.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Conduct visual research and iterative concept development for original expressions of information design.
2. Demonstrate technical, design and artistic abilities to effectively visual communicate complex information.
3. Use professional software to apply various design approaches and techniques of information visualization to originate visual communication and time−based media designs.
4. Deliver final work demonstrating refined approaches to information design.

Indicative Content
1. Visual Research - Investigation to inform an understanding of information design conventions and procedures
2. Analysis - Analyse the basic principles of the information design processes to acknowledge the challenge of media traditions and conventions through digital media artefacts, interactive media experiences and concepts to enhance audience understanding and engagement.
3. Application, Creativity and Concept Development - Use analysis findings, creative processes and design thinking to develop a solution to the personal information design project.
4. Craftsmanship and Presentation - Produce and present a final information design solution appropriate to the needs of that solution.

ART309 Description

In this module students will advance their knowledge and understanding of the visual development cycle of digital art productions for entertainment, marketing, or publishing. Based on their chosen areas of specialization, students will seek to develop a diet of research and practice that is industrially and commercially contextualized, alongside progressing their technical and creative skills. Students will demonstrate their ability to expand on expectations and themes laid out by a creative brief and to concern themselves with effective visual communication to clients and audiences.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with specialist skills for production of art used in the art used in the creative industries. By the end of this module, students will have demonstrably advanced their proficiency with the relevant processes, techniques and expectations of visual development art and design work used in the creative industries.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Conduct advanced visual contextual research into production of commercial art and integrate those contextual understandings in the development of one’s own art pieces
2. Conduct iterative concept development for original art with a defined visual style, demonstrating technical and artistic ability in the use of 2D digital methods
3. Present art and design work to a high standard and deliver final work demonstrating an awareness of professional approaches to commercial art production

Indicative Content
1. Visual Research - Conduct extensive research into existing characters, fashions, cultures, landscapes and other resources, developing ideas for use of form, shape, colour, and overall visual style
2. Concept Development - Demonstrate an appreciation of art and design contexts and the use of art and design within games, movies, advertising and other media; iteratively develop ideas and drawings for an original art.
3. Painting and Drawing - Use digital drawing and painting packages to develop environment and character concepts to produce production art.
4. Presentation - Produce character and concept art to a finished level consistent with professional practice. Be prepared to present the work in a critical setting.

DES306 Description

In this module, students will engage with the creative and technical processes involved in the design and production of game environment art. Player engagement with and perception of these spaces will be critiqued, with consideration for visual style, layout, and environmental storytelling. By the end of this project students will have gained experience in the conceptualisation, planning, modelling, texturing, and construction of game environments, which will be particularly beneficial to those who have an interest in progressing into game art roles.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with specialist skills in the critique, design, and art production of game environments.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Carry out visual and design research in order to develop an innovative and expressive concept for a game environment project
2. Demonstrate a technical understanding of game engines, game art pipelines, and software solutions for game environments
3. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the conceptual and practical issues surrounding the design and realisation of game environments, considering visual style, spatial design, and user experience
4. Iteratively design and develop an original game environment, and present this work in a manner consistent with professional practice

Indicative Content
1. Visual research and concept design - Research real-world / fictional spaces and visual styles. Develop planning materials and concept designs in support of an environment art project.
2. Level design and player interaction - Apply knowledge from level design theory and user interaction and UX design to your understanding of environment art, layout, and navigation.
3. Spatial design - Consider architectural theories and principles when developing concepts for a virtual environment.
4. Environmental storytelling - Investigate how game worlds, spaces, and immersive environments create atmosphere and tell stories through layout, props, lighting, and textures.
5. 3D modelling - Design, build and unwrap 3D models appropriate for application in game engines. Consider sculpting and its application in game environment production.
6. Materials and maps - Paint texture maps and create complex materials for application to surfaces. Consider PBR.
7. Modular kits - Build and implement kits for modular environment design.
8. Environmental animation and movement - Consider how basic environmental animation can be implemented and connected to scripted player interactions.
9. Lighting - Apply static and dynamic lighting within your scenes. Understand light bakes and additional post-processing effects.
10. Game engines - Apply all of the above in-engine to demonstrate the ability to assemble environment art for presentation as part of a game product. Create builds and flythroughs to showcase your work.

DES307 Description

In this module students will develop their knowledge and understanding of videogame character design, and focus on the development of their technical and creative skills for character art production. By the end of this module, students will have greatly advanced their proficiency with art production tools and pipelines commonly used in the games and entertainment industries for the visualisation of 3D characters.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with specialist skills in the art production of 3D game characters.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Conduct visual research and iterative concept development for an original game character with a defined visual style
2. Demonstrate technical and artistic ability in the use of 3D digital methods to create game character assets
3. Use digital painting and advanced materials to add colour, texture, and detail to character models
4. Deliver final work demonstrating an awareness of professional approaches to character presentation and an ability to implement character assets in a game engine

Indicative Content
1. Visual Research - Conduct extensive research into existing characters, fashions, cultures, and other resources, developing ideas for use of form, shape, colour, and overall visual style.
2. Concept Development - Demonstrate an appreciation of game character design literature and the use of characters within games. Iteratively develop ideas and drawings for an original game character.
3. Sculpting - Use digital sculpting packages to develop character concepts and produce high-poly assets.
4. 3D Modelling - Use 3D modelling packages, tools, and techniques to build polygon-models.
5. UVs and Retopologisation - Rebuild meshes to develop new mesh layouts, edge flow, polygon density with a view to creating cleaner and more efficient models for games. Work with UV layouts for characters.
6. Painting - Use 2D/3D painting packages to produce textures for game characters
7. Materials - Build advanced materials for characters, considering different types of materials used within a character asset (e.g. skin, hair, cloth, leather, metal etc.); consider use of PBR.
8. Presentation - Produce character video turnarounds and captured images of character assets implemented in-engine; present work in a manner consistent with professional practice.

AUD311 Description

This module introduces students to the theory and practice of sound and music for games. Drawing on examples from film and animation as well as games, the module will explore how sound design for screen media has developed over time, and how the demands of interactivity pose game sound designers a unique set of challenges. The module will explore the production approaches and workflows that underpin interactive audio design and the tools and technologies that enable its implementation in a game environment.

Aims
This module aims to develop an understanding and working knowledge of the production techniques and workflows that underpin sound and music design for games.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Develop an applied understanding of the key theories, concepts, and practices pertinent to the design and production of sound and music for games
2. Define and produce an audio design document, taking into account audience, platform, and technical constraints
3. Demonstrate the creative and technical skills necessary to produce libraries of sound and music assets for implementation in a game

Indicative Content
1. Introduction - An overview of the history of sound and music in video games, from early 8-bit soundtracks generated by Programmable Sound Generators, through streaming Red-Book audio on CD to the latest multi-channel sample-based adaptive soundtracks.
2. Background - Modern soundtracks combine ideas from gaming, but also draw heavily on film soundtracks. We will examine the similarities and differences between the two, drawing conclusions on the roles and functions that sound and music play in a computer game.
3. Recording practice - We will introduce students to recording and production theory and practice, including microphone design, application and technique; digital recording theory and practice, and sound editing.
4. Adaptive sound - Students will explore the particular characteristics of adaptive sound design for interactive media, and how nuance and adaptability factors into the design and production process.
5. Application - What are the technologies and middleware systems that support dynamic audio effects for stereo, binaural and surround gaming systems and how do these affect the production process?
6. Technical constraints - What file formats and data compression techniques are available and what are the pros and cons of each? How do these impact on the end user experience?
7. Professional planning - Students will be encouraged to take a professional approach to project planning and management, including designing an audio design document, which details both the conceptual use of sound in a game, and its specific implementation and mechanics, and a complete sound asset list, that details all of the sound elements that will be used.
8. Professional practice - We will investigate the how sound production practice aligns with professional collaboration and development pipelines, including version control, file naming conventions and metadata, particularly with regard to automated processes for implementation and regionalisation, and identifying and protecting intellectual property.
9. Case studies and exemplars - Throughout the module, students will review and discuss case study examples that demonstrate how sound and music have been used in games across a range of different formats and platforms and at different periods in history.

AUD312 Description

This module introduces students to the real-time adaptive processes and structures that drive interactive sound effects and music in games. Students will investigate the different approaches that tools offer for real-time control of sound and music, and the processes through which pre-recorded sound assets are edited, tagged, implemented, and scripted to respond to player input.

Aims
This module aims to provide the student with an applied knowledge and understanding of how sound and music are integrated into a game engine, and the techniques and systems used by sound designers and composers to implement dynamic, reactive audio environments.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to :
1. Apply suitable methods of analysis to a game soundtrack considering the technical implementation of audio and associated processes, and how they integrate and respond to player input
2. Implement a library of sound fx within a playable game demo, considering the scripting of event and parameter management for adaptive audio
3. Implement dynamic background music, considering the variety of different approaches and techniques available with modern audio middleware

Indicative Content
1. Technology - Compare and contrast middleware solutions, exploring functionality and options; Work with game engines, using scripting for event management and parameter control.
2. Interfacing - Explore the different ways that sound and music can be triggered and/or driven by game events, and the different ways that sound and music can either lead or react to player input.
3. Spatial audio - Discuss how spatial placement and reverberation help to create and characterise a sense of believable game space, and how this can be achieved within different sections and/or environments within the game.
4. Implementation - Explore the full implementation cycle of sound assets, and look at what’s involved in getting multiple layers of sound to function correctly in response to player input in a game.
5. Sound file management - Understanding differences in file formats and data encoding, and the artefacts that can be introduced can mean the difference between a soundtrack that behaves as it should, and hours of troubleshooting.
6. Profiling and troubleshooting - Explore the options available for measuring the performance of a games audio implementation. Investigate some of the common problems that affect game audio, and what solutions and/or workarounds exist.
7. Analysis - Analysing the use of sound and music in a computer game requires a particular set of analytical tools and an appreciation of context. Students will explore these notions and develop a framework for analysing interactive game-based audio.
8. Case Studies and exemplars - Review and discuss case study examples that demonstrate how sound and music have been used in videogames across a range of different formats and platforms and at different periods in history.

Computer Arts - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Game Design & Production course.

Module 1: ART206 Character Animation

Module 2: DES203 Interactive Media Production

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Game Design & Production course.

Module 1: ART302 Computer Arts Practice

Module 2: DES310 Professional Project - 40 credits (TBC)

ART206 Description

This module aims to develop students understanding of the relationship between written story, performance and visual storytelling in animated sequences. Students will explore narrative and acting theory in relation to the creation of an animated performance, and will test these ideas through the creation of and iteration upon animated sequence(s). The module is primarily aimed at animation practitioners wishing to develop expressive animated character performances.

Aims
The aim of this module is to develop students understanding and practical execution of animated character performance as an expressive contextualised form of communication.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate critical understanding of relationships between narrative context, character and performance for animation purposes
2. Examine, evaluate and synthesise animation and acting techniques which imbue personality upon a digital character through visual enquiry and iterative practice
3. Generate a portfolio that demonstrates development of complex personalities within an animated context

Indicative Content
1. Narrative Context - Explore and apply narrative concepts and processes relating to story development for an animated character performance.
2. Animation Context - Explore and develop an animated character performance in a narrative context.
3. Observational Context - Develop and apply skills for observation from life to an animated performance.
4. Pre-Production - Develop appropriate pre-production documentation to support the development of a character performance in a narrative context, such as story beats, storyboards and animatics.
5. Believable Movement - Express believable motion, weight, balance and expressive potential through drawing, planning thumbnails and in 3D animated performances.
6. Performance-Animator as Actor - Explore the thinking character through observational drawing and performance. Develop technical and conceptual abilities to apply these concepts in the creation of 3D animated performances.
7. Non-Verbal Communication - Explore the use and varying degrees of exaggeration of body language, gesture, and facial expression as communicative devices within an animated performance
8. Dialogue - Explore the development, utilisation and refinement of effective and convincing dialogue in an animated performance.
9. Acting for Camera - Demonstrate the dramatic use of the visual frame within which the performance occurs. Apply directorial camera techniques demonstrating understanding of film language and cinematography to visually support the performance.
10. Presentation - Iterate upon, finalise and compile animated performance(s) to best showcase contextual understanding and practical skills development.

DES203 Description

A complete introduction to the processes and purposes of designing and developing a piece of interactive entertainment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with exposure to the processes, pipelines and challenges involved in team-based design and development of interactive entertainment.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Work as part of a team and undertake a specific role in the production of a game prototype.
2. Iteratively produce assets and documentation in support of a game concept
3. Reflect upon and present the challenges and issues in collaborative game development

Indicative Content
1. Historical Overview - How games have been designed, prominent genres, styles and techniques.
2. Concept and Communication - Conceptualising and communicating ideas, scoping requirements, giving and receiving critique.
3. Design Process - Establishing a process, proposing solutions, iteration and documentation.
4. Core Design - Working up the concept, graphics, features, setting, story, objectives, levels.
5. The development team - Roles and responsibilities, scheduling and milestones, inclusive and supportive working.
6. Rules and Mechanics - Implementing choices, interactivity, strategies, motivation and reward, balancing gameplay.
7. Look and Feel - Establishing a style, ambience, colour and mood, sound effects, and music.
8. Cultural and Commercial Awareness - Designing for an audience, markets, genres and platforms.

ART302 Description

This module will support the development of a specialist area of practice by challenging the student to design and undertake a creative project focussing on the enhancement of their understanding of the chosen specialisation. Students will use this project as a vehicle to hone their fundamental artistic, design and technical skills which underpin their chosen specialisation. Students will lead, with module tutor support, project planning, scope and project expectations leading to a finalised portfolio of work.

Aims
To provide students with a key knowledge and skills to plan, manage and complete a project that develops their subject specialist skillset towards a professional level.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Plan, develop and undertake a specialist project which recognises key strengths and addresses skill gaps.
2. Research and synthesise industry resources, production methods and professional practices during project development in order to advance specialist knowledge and practice.
3. Engage and contribute professionally to a community of practice sharing practical processes and providing constructive critique to the work of peers.
4. Disseminate, defend and reflect upon a set of creative outcomes demonstrates advancement of practice in the chosen specialist area.

Indicative Content
1. Production methods: Analysis of key production methods and pipelines utilised by the creative sector.
2. Professional Contexts: Introduction to the vital components of obtaining professional recognition and gainful employment.
3. Project Planning: Insight and implementation of planning for project development and delivery.
4. Reflective Practice: Form essential reflective discussions of the self by recognising and logging practice and processes used past and present.
5. Peer Feedback: Critically evaluate the work of your peers using formal language to form practical, constructive advice.
6. Project Expectation Management: Review and evaluate project objectives at different stages to manage expectations for project delivery.
7. Specialist Practice: Evaluate the methods and techniques of relevant professionals in creative fields synonymous to the project. Extract valuable information and implement in project development.

DES310 Description

For this module, students will be required to work together on an interactive media project as part of a multidisciplinary team. Individual students will be expected to contribute to their team by taking on a professional role suited to their area of study. As part of the module, all students will be expected to: communicate with clients and relevant stakeholders; participate in pitching and presentations; research and test technical pipelines; create project documentation and planning materials; and contribute to the iterative design and development of a final interactive prototype.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a multidisciplinary development team, contributing to planning, presenting, prototyping, and production.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Contribute to the development, testing, enhancement, and completion of a defined interactive media project
2. Demonstrate the ability to fulfil and appraise their own defined professional role within a team, evaluating their contribution in relation to expectations of the comparable role in industry
3. Demonstrate teamwork, communication, and professionalism through collaboration on- and delivery of- a team project

Indicative Content
1. Team Organisation and Management - Attend and participate in team meetings, keep meeting minutes, and assign roles and responsibilities; Identify and overcome team problems, understand conflicts and approaches to conflict resolution, and engage with team building.
2. Communication and Professionalism - Demonstrate the ability to communicate within the team, with tutors, with clients/mentors, and with other stakeholders in a professional and respectful manner.
3. Development Methodologies - Understand and apply appropriate development methodologies framed by the requirements of a project and balance of a team, e.g. agile, scrum, lean, spiral, feature-driven, waterfall/traditional.
4. Research and Concept Development - Research similar products and competitors; Research and interpret the product marketplace, considering platform, user profiles, costs, regional differences etc; Conduct visual and audio research; Iteratively develop design concepts in response to a given brief.
5. Technologies and Pipelines - Research software and hardware technologies; Develop a technical plan for game development; Research, develop, test and document production pipelines.
6. Style and Branding - Develop a brand for the team and the project; Research, develop, document, and communicate a defined visual and audio style; Produce marketing and promotional materials.
7. Pitching and Presentation - Use appropriate software, hardware, game engines, and other tools to deliver a working digital prototype; Engage with regular user testing to inform design iteration, demonstrating an appreciation of user experience.
8. Prototype Development, Testing, and Iteration - Use appropriate software, hardware, game engines, and other tools to deliver a working digital prototype; Engage with regular user testing to inform design iteration, demonstrating an appreciation of user experience.
9. Release Management - Manage the software development process using source control, defect tracking, and build processes.
10. Project Delivery - Consider the methods for delivering products to the market, including market cycles, digital distribution, and the publisher-developer relationship; Deliver a complete prototype with accompanying press kit.

Game Design & Production - Semester 1

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Game Design and Production course.

Module 1: DES201 Gameplay and Narrative Design

Module 2: DES204 3D Design for Games

Module 3: DES205 Level Design and Scripting

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Game Design and Production course.

Module 1: DES303 Production & Leadership

 

For modules 2 & 3, choose one of the following pairs of modules:

DES304 Game Mechanics and System Design & DES308 Analytics and Data-Driven Game Design

DES306 Environment Art Production & DES307 Character Art Production

AUD311 Sound and Music for Games & AUD312 Game Audio Implementation

DES201 Description

The module will introduce students to the knowledge, processes and techniques necessary to formulate and explore effective, innovative game ideas with consideration for the structure of both gameplay and narrative design.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to engage with the development of innovative game concepts, through establishing an informed awareness of design process and evaluation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Describe and practice the techniques and processes required to effectively form, develop, and design games.
2. Demonstrate a considered design process and awareness of the key conceptual, audience, and cultural models that can impact on game design.
3. Create game design documentation and artefacts that reflect the processes utilised across the mainstream games industry and emergent development communities.

Indicative Content
1. Game Genre Mechanics - Deconstructing core components of popular game genres.
2. Constructs of Gameplay - What is gameplay and how is this broken down and communicated within the game design.
3. Design Documents and Artefacts - Physical prototypes, visual documentation, technical design, capturing requirements.
4. Game Design Process - Conceptualisation, iteration, phases of workflow, alternative approaches.
5. Narrative Theory for Game Design - Themes, narrative structures, characters, storyboarding, animatics, scripts.
6. Experimental Approaches - Exploring emergent practices and methods for innovative game design.
7. Visualisation and Digital Techniques - Utilising digital techniques to produce gameplay and narrative previsualisation, developing rudimentary digital prototypes.
8. Audience and Cultural Engagement - Discussing the role of audience and exploring cultural aspects of game design.

DES204 Description

This module will introduce students to the 3D game art pipeline, providing them with the knowledge and skills required to design and build their own 3D assets for games.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the technical and conceptual skills required to create 3D assets for games.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate the ability to create textured 3D game assets for application in a game engine.
2. Apply theories of colour, light, and composition to the iterative design and development of a 3D scene.
3. Deliver a portfolio of 3D game assets that demonstrates an appreciation of how artwork should be prepared and presented to prospective employers.

Indicative Content
1. Software skills - Work with a range of 2D, 3D, and game engine tools to produce 3D game assets.
2. Polygon modelling - Use polygon modelling tools to build 3D assets for games.
3. Curves and NURBS modelling - Create polygon models for games using curves and NURBS modelling tools.
4. UV mapping - Create and edit UV layouts for 3D models.
5. Materials - Learn to select, edit, and apply materials to 3D models in both 3D software and in game engines.
6. Texture production - Use 2D graphics packages to build textures and texture sets for 3D game models.
7. 3D painting - Create texture maps using 3D painting packages and techniques.
8. Sculpting - Use sculpting packages/tools to create high poly detail and generate advanced texture maps.
9. Lighting - Apply theories of colour and light to 3D game scenes.
10. Modular production - Learn to create modular 3D assets appropriate for the production of game scenes.

DES205 Description

This module develops student skills in the use of game engines with an emphasis on the creation of game content and levels underpinned by level design theory and practice.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the theoretical, practical, and technical knowledge required to utilise game engines and operate as an effective level designer.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to :
1. Utilise core game engine functionality and tools for game development.
2. Develop custom logic and entities for use in game development.
3. Demonstrate an appreciation for level design theory through the development of game levels utilising a prominent game engine.

Indicative Content
1. Terminology and concepts - Common aspects and features of game engines.
2. Editing systems - Creating custom geometry, terrain etc. with in-engine tools.
3. Scripting game logic - Adding interaction to a level.
4. AI and pathing - Pathing techniques and movement logic.
5. Physics - Creating custom physics interactions.
6. Interface - Creating and editing user interfaces.
7. Content - Importing art and audio content.
8. Cameras - Working with cameras, animating and switching between cameras, cut-scenes.
9. Spatial and lighting design - Considering appropriate theories for spatial layout, composition, lighting etc.
10. User experience - Considering the user journey, playtesting, iteration.

DES303 Description

This module develops an in-depth understanding of the issues around the production process and managing a creative team

Aims
The aim of this Module is to provide the student with an understanding of the role processes and methodologies associated with person- management skills required for the creative industries. Together with the legal and ethical frameworks surrounding creative media, and operating in a professional manner within these constraints.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Explain the issues relating to keeping a team of creative individuals content and productive
2. Analyse and evaluate techniques and practices to keep a team project on time and within budget
3. Know how to analyse and evaluate the risks associated with a development, and to classify and control these risks
4. Describe and discuss a range of current business models that underpin and drive media production and distribution.
5. Critically analyse a variety of legal, moral and ethical issues affecting the creative industries.

Indicative Content
1. Leadership - Management styles, defining roles, responsibilities skills etc. of good managers, assertiveness, rapport, influence, leadership, management strategies.
2. Controlling Software Production - Programmers, code, data, version control, tools, software reviews, the mythical man-month, the principles of software engineering.
3. Controlling Asset Production - Analogue artworks, digital artwork conversion and creation, static imagery, time-based imagery, FMV, character design, look'n'feel. Importance of audio sound effects, ambient noise, music creation, capture, editing, editing, conversion, storage, size, reproduction, immersion.
4. Production Control - The project reporting mechanisms, planning, management, organisation, staffing, directing, controlling, project initiation, plans, budget, resources, inventories, termination, project management tools.
5. Human Factors - Building self-esteem, confidence, intra- and inter- team relationships, domain expertise, discontent, resolving conflict, managing performance.
6. Handling Criticism - Internal and External mechanisms for evaluation, the media cycle and handling reviews
7. Team Dynamics - How teams operate and develop, relationships, stakeholders, reporting agreements, diversity as strength, goal-setting, identifying strengths and weaknesses.
8. Case Studies - How games and interactive media companies are managed. Variety of company structures and teams, value of analysis and post-mortems. Using games- related and non-games industry examples.
10. Managing Risk and Uncertainty - Identifying and managing risk in resources, processes and legal aspects. Quality assurance as part of production: planning, QA teams, outsourcing, costing, testing, alpha/beta/gold master stages.

DES304 Description

In this module students will develop the applied technical and creative skills necessary to design and script prototypes that demonstrate the functionality of game mechanics and systems. Students will promote rapid prototyping as a useful evaluation tool and an essential part of the development process.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the skills to analyse, develop and critique functional prototypes based on gameplay design.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the techniques required to design and develop gameplay prototypes
2. Consider how gameplay prototypes are underpinned by the design of systems and mechanics
3. Iteratively design and develop gameplay prototypes demonstrating an appreciation of required functionality and user experience
4. Evaluate the design and implementation of a gameplay prototype

Indicative Content
1. Evolution of Gameplay Mechanics - Examine how the implementation of gameplay mechanics has changed over time.
2. Game Systems - Examine game systems and consider how the relationships between mechanics and variables are crafted to create a balanced gameplay experience.
3. Gameplay Analysis - Analyse existing implementations of game mechanics and systems.
4. Gameplay Mechanics Functional Analysis - Analyse and deconstruct game mechanics design into their component parts required for functional implementation.
5. Gameplay Implementation - Explore the range of tools and techniques available to implement gameplay in prototype games.
6. Iterative Development - Understand the development process of rapid game prototyping.
7. Evaluation Methods - Identify how gameplay implementation can be evaluated in terms of desired functionality and user experience.
8. Aesthetics - Consider the effect of aesthetics on gameplay implementation and how aesthetics can be used to enhance the user experience.
9. Game Balancing - Explore and implement techniques to balance individual elements of a gameplay prototype and examine the effect this has on the overall user experience.
10. Emergent Gameplay - Explore the techniques that can be applied to create emergent gameplay within prototype games.

DES308 Description

As games have moved more towards services, subscription models, and live online updates, the collection and analysis of player data is increasingly important to the games industry. Data is valuable not only for improving user experience and balancing gameplay, but also understanding player behaviours and driving profits for games companies. This module will introduce game design students to player data collection and analysis, and prepare students for games and related creative industries that involve user research and product management.

Aims
The aim of this module is to introduce students to the tools, methods, and techniques that are used in the games industry to collect and analyse player data

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Incorporate player data collection into the design and implementation of game mechanics, levels, and interfaces
2. Interpret player behavior and decisions through collection and analysis of player data
3. Act upon this analysis to consider improvements for retention, balance, difficulty, and user experience

Indicative Content
1. Tools - Reviewing available in-engine and third-party solutions for analytics.
2. Data visualisation and interpretation - Utilising dashboards to display and interpret data.
3. Statistics and analysis - Introduction to basic statistical methods for analysing data.
4. Player behaviours - Track and understand player behaviours.
5. Balance and retention - Adjust game design based on data analysis.
6. Ads - Integrating advertising into games.
7. Monetisation strategies - Sales models for games such as premium, freemium, and subscriptions.
8. Monetisation performance - Understanding metrics such as DAU and ARPDAU to track players and revenue.

DES306 Description

In this module, students will engage with the creative and technical processes involved in the design and production of game environment art. Player engagement with and perception of these spaces will be critiqued, with consideration for visual style, layout, and environmental storytelling. By the end of this project students will have gained experience in the conceptualisation, planning, modelling, texturing, and construction of game environments, which will be particularly beneficial to those who have an interest in progressing into game art roles.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with specialist skills in the critique, design, and art production of game environments.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Carry out visual and design research in order to develop an innovative and expressive concept for a game environment project
2. Demonstrate a technical understanding of game engines, game art pipelines, and software solutions for game environments
3. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the conceptual and practical issues surrounding the design and realisation of game environments, considering visual style, spatial design, and user experience
4. Iteratively design and develop an original game environment, and present this work in a manner consistent with professional practice

Indicative Content
1. Visual research and concept design - Research real-world / fictional spaces and visual styles. Develop planning materials and concept designs in support of an environment art project.
2. Level design and player interaction - Apply knowledge from level design theory and user interaction and UX design to your understanding of environment art, layout, and navigation.
3. Spatial design - Consider architectural theories and principles when developing concepts for a virtual environment.
4. Environmental storytelling - Investigate how game worlds, spaces, and immersive environments create atmosphere and tell stories through layout, props, lighting, and textures.
5. 3D modelling - Design, build and unwrap 3D models appropriate for application in game engines. Consider sculpting and its application in game environment production.
6. Materials and maps - Paint texture maps and create complex materials for application to surfaces. Consider PBR.
7. Modular kits - Build and implement kits for modular environment design.
8. Environmental animation and movement - Consider how basic environmental animation can be implemented and connected to scripted player interactions.
9. Lighting - Apply static and dynamic lighting within your scenes. Understand light bakes and additional post-processing effects.
10. Game engines - Apply all of the above in-engine to demonstrate the ability to assemble environment art for presentation as part of a game product. Create builds and flythroughs to showcase your work.

DES307 Description

In this module students will develop their knowledge and understanding of videogame character design, and focus on the development of their technical and creative skills for character art production. By the end of this module, students will have greatly advanced their proficiency with art production tools and pipelines commonly used in the games and entertainment industries for the visualisation of 3D characters.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with specialist skills in the art production of 3D game characters.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Conduct visual research and iterative concept development for an original game character with a defined visual style
2. Demonstrate technical and artistic ability in the use of 3D digital methods to create game character assets
3. Use digital painting and advanced materials to add colour, texture, and detail to character models
4. Deliver final work demonstrating an awareness of professional approaches to character presentation and an ability to implement character assets in a game engine

Indicative Content
1. Visual Research - Conduct extensive research into existing characters, fashions, cultures, and other resources, developing ideas for use of form, shape, colour, and overall visual style.
2. Concept Development - Demonstrate an appreciation of game character design literature and the use of characters within games. Iteratively develop ideas and drawings for an original game character.
3. Sculpting - Use digital sculpting packages to develop character concepts and produce high-poly assets.
4. 3D Modelling - Use 3D modelling packages, tools, and techniques to build polygon-models.
5. UVs and Retopologisation - Rebuild meshes to develop new mesh layouts, edge flow, polygon density with a view to creating cleaner and more efficient models for games. Work with UV layouts for characters.
6. Painting - Use 2D/3D painting packages to produce textures for game characters
7. Materials - Build advanced materials for characters, considering different types of materials used within a character asset (e.g. skin, hair, cloth, leather, metal etc.); consider use of PBR.
8. Presentation - Produce character video turnarounds and captured images of character assets implemented in-engine; present work in a manner consistent with professional practice.

AUD311 Description

This module introduces students to the theory and practice of sound and music for games. Drawing on examples from film and animation as well as games, the module will explore how sound design for screen media has developed over time, and how the demands of interactivity pose game sound designers a unique set of challenges. The module will explore the production approaches and workflows that underpin interactive audio design and the tools and technologies that enable its implementation in a game environment.

Aims
This module aims to develop an understanding and working knowledge of the production techniques and workflows that underpin sound and music design for games.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Develop an applied understanding of the key theories, concepts, and practices pertinent to the design and production of sound and music for games
2. Define and produce an audio design document, taking into account audience, platform, and technical constraints
3. Demonstrate the creative and technical skills necessary to produce libraries of sound and music assets for implementation in a game

Indicative Content
1. Introduction - An overview of the history of sound and music in video games, from early 8-bit soundtracks generated by Programmable Sound Generators, through streaming Red-Book audio on CD to the latest multi-channel sample-based adaptive soundtracks.
2. Background - Modern soundtracks combine ideas from gaming, but also draw heavily on film soundtracks. We will examine the similarities and differences between the two, drawing conclusions on the roles and functions that sound and music play in a computer game.
3. Recording practice - We will introduce students to recording and production theory and practice, including microphone design, application and technique; digital recording theory and practice, and sound editing.
4. Adaptive sound - Students will explore the particular characteristics of adaptive sound design for interactive media, and how nuance and adaptability factors into the design and production process.
5. Application - What are the technologies and middleware systems that support dynamic audio effects for stereo, binaural and surround gaming systems and how do these affect the production process?
6. Technical constraints - What file formats and data compression techniques are available and what are the pros and cons of each? How do these impact on the end user experience?
7. Professional planning - Students will be encouraged to take a professional approach to project planning and management, including designing an audio design document, which details both the conceptual use of sound in a game, and its specific implementation and mechanics, and a complete sound asset list, that details all of the sound elements that will be used.
8. Professional practice - We will investigate the how sound production practice aligns with professional collaboration and development pipelines, including version control, file naming conventions and metadata, particularly with regard to automated processes for implementation and regionalisation, and identifying and protecting intellectual property.
9. Case studies and exemplars - Throughout the module, students will review and discuss case study examples that demonstrate how sound and music have been used in games across a range of different formats and platforms and at different periods in history.

AUD312 Description

This module introduces students to the real-time adaptive processes and structures that drive interactive sound effects and music in games. Students will investigate the different approaches that tools offer for real-time control of sound and music, and the processes through which pre-recorded sound assets are edited, tagged, implemented, and scripted to respond to player input.

Aims
This module aims to provide the student with an applied knowledge and understanding of how sound and music are integrated into a game engine, and the techniques and systems used by sound designers and composers to implement dynamic, reactive audio environments.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to :
1. Apply suitable methods of analysis to a game soundtrack considering the technical implementation of audio and associated processes, and how they integrate and respond to player input
2. Implement a library of sound fx within a playable game demo, considering the scripting of event and parameter management for adaptive audio
3. Implement dynamic background music, considering the variety of different approaches and techniques available with modern audio middleware

Indicative Content
1. Technology - Compare and contrast middleware solutions, exploring functionality and options; Work with game engines, using scripting for event management and parameter control.
2. Interfacing - Explore the different ways that sound and music can be triggered and/or driven by game events, and the different ways that sound and music can either lead or react to player input.
3. Spatial audio - Discuss how spatial placement and reverberation help to create and characterise a sense of believable game space, and how this can be achieved within different sections and/or environments within the game.
4. Implementation - Explore the full implementation cycle of sound assets, and look at what’s involved in getting multiple layers of sound to function correctly in response to player input in a game.
5. Sound file management - Understanding differences in file formats and data encoding, and the artefacts that can be introduced can mean the difference between a soundtrack that behaves as it should, and hours of troubleshooting.
6. Profiling and troubleshooting - Explore the options available for measuring the performance of a games audio implementation. Investigate some of the common problems that affect game audio, and what solutions and/or workarounds exist.
7. Analysis - Analysing the use of sound and music in a computer game requires a particular set of analytical tools and an appreciation of context. Students will explore these notions and develop a framework for analysing interactive game-based audio.
8. Case Studies and exemplars - Review and discuss case study examples that demonstrate how sound and music have been used in videogames across a range of different formats and platforms and at different periods in history.

Game Design & Production - Semester 2

Option 1 

This pathway is from the 2nd year of the BA Game Design & Production course.

Module 1: DES206 User Interfaces and interaction Design

Module 2: DES203 Interactive Media Production

Module 3: choose one of our elective modules

Option 2 

This pathway is from the 3rd year of the BA Game Design & Production course.

Module 1: DES311 Game Design Practice

Module 2: DES310 Professional Project - 40 credits (TBC)

DES206 Description

Operating at the intersection of graphic design, interaction design, programming, and psychology, User Interface (UI) designers hold significant responsibility within game development teams and digital design studios. This module provides an opportunity for game design students to develop their practical and technical skills in UI design, whilst also developing their applied knowledge and understanding of underpinning theories and methodologies.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to develop effective user interfaces (UI) underpinned by appreciation of interaction design and user experience (UX) design.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to :
1. Demonstrate an understanding of UI design practices, sensibilities, and theories
2. Research audiences and platforms to inform UX design that supports effective communication, accessibility, and interaction
3. Iteratively develop and test UI prototypes informed by knowledge and understanding of interaction design

Indicative Content
1. UX and UI - Considering user experience and the intersection with user interfaces. Examining the role of UX/UI designers in industry.
2. Interaction design - Discussing methodologies of interaction design and associated design disciplines such as human-computer interaction (HCI), user-centered design (UCD) and human factors.
3. Accessibility and inclusive design - Considering audience diversity and the need to design and develop accessible interfaces.
4. Game UI and menus - Diegetic, non-diegetic, meta, and spatial UI. Structuring menus for consistency, clarity, and effective communication with players.
5. Graphic design for interfaces - Graphic design principles and visual style considerations; skeuomorphism, flat design, hierarchy, composition.
6. Feedback - Interface animation, visual feedback, and audio feedback.
7. Controllers - Controller selection/design, control mapping, communicating controls to players.
8. Platforms - Understanding platforms - including mobile, console, PC, online, VR/AR/MR – and how platform selection interacts with UX and UI design.

DES203 Description

A complete introduction to the processes and purposes of designing and developing a piece of interactive entertainment.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with exposure to the processes, pipelines and challenges involved in team-based design and development of interactive entertainment.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Work as part of a team and undertake a specific role in the production of a game prototype.
2. Iteratively produce assets and documentation in support of a game concept
3. Reflect upon and present the challenges and issues in collaborative game development

Indicative Content
1. Historical Overview - How games have been designed, prominent genres, styles and techniques.
2. Concept and Communication - Conceptualising and communicating ideas, scoping requirements, giving and receiving critique.
3. Design Process - Establishing a process, proposing solutions, iteration and documentation.
4. Core Design - Working up the concept, graphics, features, setting, story, objectives, levels.
5. The development team - Roles and responsibilities, scheduling and milestones, inclusive and supportive working.
6. Rules and Mechanics - Implementing choices, interactivity, strategies, motivation and reward, balancing gameplay.
7. Look and Feel - Establishing a style, ambience, colour and mood, sound effects, and music.
8. Cultural and Commercial Awareness - Designing for an audience, markets, genres and platforms.

DES311 Description

The field of game design encompasses a breadth of specialist roles and applications. In this module, students will be supported to identify their own areas of interest and professional specialisation, taking into account factors such as game genres, audiences, platforms, technologies, and content. With the support of the tutor, students will research game design practice and develop a PDP targeted at skill and portfolio development.

Aims
The aim of this module is provide students with the opportunity to undertake advanced independent study in a defined area of game design practice, with a view to developing relevant creative, technical, and professional skills.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Research contemporary areas of game design practice, identifying roles, responsibilities, required skills, and relevant bodies of knowledge.
2. Identify an area of personal interest within the field of game design, and devise a personal development plan founded upon a skills audit
3. Undertake a specialist project following self-directed tutorials and reading, leading to the generation of a portfolio of new game design work
4. Demonstrate the ability to assess and communicate one’s own development, and to devise effective strategies for ongoing personal improvement

Indicative Content
1. Game design roles - Researching game design and related roles across the games industry, e.g. gameplay design, systems design, technical design, mission/quest design, level design, environment art/design, character art/design, narrative design, cinematics design, lighting and VFX design, sound design, content design, UX/UI design, monetisation design, immersive experience design, etc.
2. Games genres and audiences - Researching how factors such as game genres and target audiences impact on approaches to game design, skills, and bodies of knowledge.
3. Game technologies and platforms - Considering game design for a breadth of devices, e.g. mobile/tablet, specialist console, PC/Mac, online, VR, AR, MR, performance, and analogue game design.
4. Bodies of knowledge - Developing an appreciation of the relevant bodies of knowledge to game design in general, and specialist roles and applications in particular. Producing and making use of reading lists that encompass not only literature in game design and game studies, but also other fields and disciplines that overlap with specialist areas of game design practice.
5. Skills audit - Undertake structured review of current skills as mapped to game design in general and to specific roles and applications of game design that are of personal interest. Use a skills audit to assist in planning for personal development, and for helping to shape and update your CV.
6. Personal development planning - Develop a PDP that frames your self-directed learning, encompassing technical and software tutorials, reading to support development of theoretical and conceptual knowledge, and ongoing applied practice to improve skills, abilities, and to enhance your portfolio.
7. Specialist portfolio - Review the portfolios of peers and professionals, and carry out an independent study project that will underpin the production of a portfolio targeted at a specialist game design role or application.
8. Self-assessment and peer feedback - Understand the need to engage with regular and honest self-assessment, and the value of regular sharing of work with peers and wider communities of practice.

DES310 Description

For this module, students will be required to work together on an interactive media project as part of a multidisciplinary team. Individual students will be expected to contribute to their team by taking on a professional role suited to their area of study. As part of the module, all students will be expected to: communicate with clients and relevant stakeholders; participate in pitching and presentations; research and test technical pipelines; create project documentation and planning materials; and contribute to the iterative design and development of a final interactive prototype.

Aims
The aim of this module is to provide the student with the ability to operate professionally as a subject specialist within a multidisciplinary development team, contributing to planning, presenting, prototyping, and production.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module the student should be able to:
1. Contribute to the development, testing, enhancement, and completion of a defined interactive media project
2. Demonstrate the ability to fulfil and appraise their own defined professional role within a team, evaluating their contribution in relation to expectations of the comparable role in industry
3. Demonstrate teamwork, communication, and professionalism through collaboration on- and delivery of- a team project

Indicative Content
1. Team Organisation and Management - Attend and participate in team meetings, keep meeting minutes, and assign roles and responsibilities; Identify and overcome team problems, understand conflicts and approaches to conflict resolution, and engage with team building.
2. Communication and Professionalism - Demonstrate the ability to communicate within the team, with tutors, with clients/mentors, and with other stakeholders in a professional and respectful manner.
3. Development Methodologies - Understand and apply appropriate development methodologies framed by the requirements of a project and balance of a team, e.g. agile, scrum, lean, spiral, feature-driven, waterfall/traditional.
4. Research and Concept Development - Research similar products and competitors; Research and interpret the product marketplace, considering platform, user profiles, costs, regional differences etc; Conduct visual and audio research; Iteratively develop design concepts in response to a given brief.
5. Technologies and Pipelines - Research software and hardware technologies; Develop a technical plan for game development; Research, develop, test and document production pipelines.
6. Style and Branding - Develop a brand for the team and the project; Research, develop, document, and communicate a defined visual and audio style; Produce marketing and promotional materials.
7. Pitching and Presentation - Use appropriate software, hardware, game engines, and other tools to deliver a working digital prototype; Engage with regular user testing to inform design iteration, demonstrating an appreciation of user experience.
8. Prototype Development, Testing, and Iteration - Use appropriate software, hardware, game engines, and other tools to deliver a working digital prototype; Engage with regular user testing to inform design iteration, demonstrating an appreciation of user experience.
9. Release Management - Manage the software development process using source control, defect tracking, and build processes.
10. Project Delivery - Consider the methods for delivering products to the market, including market cycles, digital distribution, and the publisher-developer relationship; Deliver a complete prototype with accompanying press kit.