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Miss Lynsay Shepherd

Role: Lecturer

Division: Division of Computing and Mathematics

School/Department: School of Arts, Media & Computer Games

Telephone Number: +44 (0)1382 308685

Email: Lynsay.Shepherd@abertay.ac.uk



Biography

Dr Lynsay A. Shepherd studied at Abertay University, Dundee, and holds a PhD in Usable Security (2016), an MSc in Internet Computing (2011) and a BSc (Hons) in Computing (2009).  She is currently a lecturer in Usable Security at Abertay University, Dundee, and is an active member of the Security Research Group within the Division of Cyber Security.  Lynsay has also recently joined the Human-Centred Security Research Group at Abertay (http://www.hcisec.co.uk).

Lynsay's current research interests include: human factors of cyber security, security awareness, affective feedback, human–computer interaction, and open-source intelligence.

Lynsay's research website can be found at https://www.lynsayshepherd.co.uk/

Teaching

2017/18 Academic Session:

  • CMP204 Dynamic Web Development
  • CMP308 Professional Project Planning and Prototyping (co-deliverer)
  • CMP311 Professional Project Development and Delivery (co-deliverer)
  • CMP319 Ethical Hacking 2
  • CMP414 Web Futures (co-deliverer)

 

Previous modules taught:

  • CMP204 Dynamic Web Development, 2016 - onwards
  • CMP311 Professional Project Development and Delivery, 2017 - onwards, (co-deliverer)
  • CMP319 Ethical Hacking 2, 2016 - onwards
  • CMP401 Honours Project Scoping and Proposal, 2016/17 (co-deliverer)
  • CMP412 Mobile Forensics, 2016/17
  • CMP414 Web Futures, 2017 - onwards, (co-deliverer)

 

Previous modules taught (as a part-time lecturer):

  • CE0831A Data Design and Organisation, 2015/16, (co-deliverer)
  • CE0931A Information Architecture, 2015/16, (co-deliverer)

 

Previous modules involved with (as a teaching assistant)

  • CE0825A Object Oriented Programming 2, 2014/15, (co-deliverer)
  • CE0702A Practical Session 2, 2014/15, (co-deliverer)
  • CE0714A/CE0711A Computer Hardware Architecture and Operating Systems, 2012/13 to 2015/16
  • CE0937A Advanced Web Scripting, 2011/12
  • CE0931A Database and Internet Application Design, 2011/12 to 2015/16
  • CE0831A Web Standards, 2011/12 to 2012/13
  • CE0703A Professional Practice, 2011/12
  • SA0751A Database Fundementals, 2010/11 to 2011/12
  • SA1032A XML and the Mobile Internet, 2009/10 to 2011/12

Research

Despite the availability of security tools, end-user devices are still vulnerable to compromise via the risky security behaviour of end-users. Risky behaviour is not necessarily obvious to all end-users, and can be difficult to recognise. Lynsay is interested in the human aspects of cyber security, investigating how to effectively communicate security information to average end-users, with a view to improving their overall level of security awareness.

Current research interests include: human factors of cyber security, security awareness, affective feedback, human-computer interaction, and open-source intelligence.

Lynsay supervises a variety of projects at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. If you are interested in any of the aforementioned topics, please get in contact with her.

Publications

Conference and journal papers

Shepherd L.A., Archibald J., Ferguson R.I. (2017) Assessing the Impact of Affective Feedback on End-User Security Awareness. In: Tryfonas, T. (eds) Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust. HAS 2017. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 10292, pp. 143–159. Springer International Publishing.

Shepherd L.A., Archibald J. (2017) Security Awareness and Affective Feedback: Categorical Behaviour vs. Reported Behaviour. 2017 International Conference On Cyber Situational Awareness, Data Analytics And Assessment (CyberSA), London, 2017.

Shepherd LA, Archibald J, Ferguson R.I. Reducing Risky Security Behaviours: Utilising Affective Feedback to Educate Users. Future Internet. 2014; 6(4):760-772.

Shepherd, L. A. Archibald, J. and Ferguson, R. I. (2014). Reducing risky security behaviours: utilising affective feedback to educate users, Proceedings of Cyberforensics 2014, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, pp7-14, 2014

Shepherd, L. A. Archibald, J. and Ferguson, R. I. (2013). Perception of risky security behaviour by users: survey of current approaches. Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 8030,176-185

 

Theses

Shepherd, L. A. 2016. Enhancing security risk awareness in end-users via affective feedback. PhD, Abertay University, https://rke.abertay.ac.uk/en/studentTheses/enhancing-security-risk-awareness-in-end-users-via-affective-feed

Shepherd, L. A. 2011. Determining Identity on Mobile Phones Using Keystroke Analysis. MSc, Abertay University

Esteem

Editorial and reviewer roles

  • Programme Committee (Reviewer) – International Conference On Cyber Situational Awareness (IEEE Cyber SA 2017)
  • Programme Committee (Reviewer) – International Conference On Cyber Security and Protection (IEEE Cyber Security 2017)
  • Judging Panel, Poster Competition for Women in Cyber Security, Napier University, Edinburgh, Scotland (May 2017)

Knowledge Exchange

  • International Health Battle and iAge Project (Interreg Europe Project)- Lynsay participated as a team security expert in the International Health Battle and iAge Meetings, Hanze University Groningen, Netherlands, November 2013. It involved working on an eHealth case with a multidisciplinary team, forming a solution and presenting a pitch.

Funding

  • Recipient of a competitive Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA) studentship award of 3.5 years to support PhD work (2012-2016). Funding equated to approximately £18000 per year (total: £63000).
  • Collaborative Innovation Funding, Informatics Ventures, June 2014. Secured preliminary funding of £3000 to perform a market study investigating the requirements needed for a piece of Open Source Intelligence software.

Outreach

Invited talks

  • Presenter at the SICSA Cyber Security Christmas Lectures in 2016 with a presentation entitled “A Fridge Full Of Spam”.
  • Speaker at the SICSA Cyber Security Christmas Lectures from 2012-2014. Delivered talks to school pupils about social engineering and the danger of geolocation data shared in tweets.

Events

  • "Women in Security: protecting ourselves, protecting our world" event at Abertay University in March 2013. The aim of the event was to showcase the work female scientists are currently undertaking, and to persuade girls to pursue a career in STEM subjects. Lynsay provided a demo, illustrating the dangers of revealing too much information online.

Press