Dr John Malone

Lecturer

School School of Applied Sciences

Department Division of Sport and Exercise Sciences

Contact info

+44 (0)1382 30 8065

Biography

I joined Abertay University in 2014 from Liverpool Hope University, where I was a Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Sport and Exercise Science.  Previously, I held lecturing positions at University College Dublin and American College Dublin.

My academic qualifications include a BSc. (Hons.) in Sport, Coaching and Exercise (Manchester Metropolitan University); MSc. Exercise Physiology (Trinity College Dublin); PhD Sports Medicine (University College Dublin); PGDip Academic Practice (Liverpool Hope University). I am also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA).

My principal area of research is Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES).  I am currently interested in the development of NMES protocols for use in a home-based setting for elderly populations in collaboration with University College Dublin.

My wider interests include muscle physiology and ageing, sports recovery and strength and conditioning.  Other relevant qualifications include being a NSCA Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), and a NASM Level 3 Certified Personal Trainer.

Current Post:

2014 - Present:   Lecturer - Division of Sport and Exercise Sciences

Roles include:

  • Programme and Module Leader
  • Division Rep for Health and Safety

Previous HE Employment:

  • 2012-2014:   Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Sport and Exercise Science (Liverpool Hope University)
  • 2009-2012:   Associate Lecturer in Strength and Conditioning (University College Dublin)
  • 2008-2010:   External Lecturer in Anatomy and Physiology (American College Dublin)

Academic Qualifications:

  • 2001 - 2004:   BSc.(Hons.) Sport, Coaching & Exercise (Manchester Metropolitan University)
  • 2005 - 2006:   H.Dip. (Taught) Exercise Physiology (Trinity College Dublin)
  • 2007 - 2008:   MSc. (Research) Exercise Physiology(Trinity College Dublin)
  • 2009 - 2012:   PhD. Sports Medicine (University College Dublin)
  • 2012 - 2013:   PG Cert. Academic Practice (Liverpool Hope University)

Fellowships:

  • 2013 - :   Higher Education Academy (HEA)

Other Relevant Qualifications:

  • 2007:   NSCA – Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) 
  • 2009:   NASM – Level 3 Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) 

 

ACADEMIC YEAR 2016/17

Programme Leader:

  • BSc. (Hons.) Strength and Conditioning
  • BSc. (Hons.) Physical Activity and Health

Module Leader:

  • SPS305 - Practical Strength and Conditioning 1 (Yr. 3)
  • SPS410 - Practical Strength and Conditioning 2 (Yr. 4)
  • SPS401 - Work Placement (Yr 4)

Also Teach on:

  • SPS312 - Research Methods (Yr. 3)
  • SPS400 - Sports Research Project (Yr. 4)

Post Graduate Supervision:

2016-2017:   Primary supervisor to Mr Dominic O' Connor, who sucessfully completed his Viva in April 2016 for the award of MSc. by Research.  His thesis is entitled 'The Physiological and Subjective Responses to Varying Doses of Sprint Interval Training'.

My broad areas of interest include muscle physiology and ageing, sports recovery, testing and evaluation of human performance, strength and conditioning and exercise and health.

My principal area of research is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES).  At present, I am interested in the development of NMES protocols for use in a home based setting for elderly populations. 

 

2019

The dose response for sprint interval training interventions may affect the time course of aerobic training adaptations

O'Connor, D. & Malone, J. K. (2019) The dose response for sprint interval training interventions may affect the time course of aerobic training adaptations. . . .
View in Research Portal

2018

Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)

Cafolla, L., Caulfield, B., Cobley, J., Crowe, L. & Malone, J. K. (2018) Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). . . p. 394. .
View in Research Portal

2016

The effects of ageing and exercise on skeletal muscle structure and function

Malone, J. K. (2016) The effects of ageing and exercise on skeletal muscle structure and function. In: Sedentary lifestyle: predictive factors, health risks and physiological implications. . p. 69-84. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.
View in Research Portal

2015

The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation

Cobley, J. N., Margaritelis, N. V., Morton, J. P., Close, G. L., Nikolaidis, M. G. & Malone, J. K. (2015) The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation. . . .
View in Research Portal

2014

Neuromuscular electrical stimulation: no enhancement of recovery from maximal exercise

Malone, J. K., Blake, C. & Caulfield, B. (2014) Neuromuscular electrical stimulation: no enhancement of recovery from maximal exercise. . . p. 791-797. .
View in Research Portal

Neuromuscular electrical stimulation during recovery from exercise: a systematic review

Malone, J. K., Blake, C. & Caulfield, B. (2014) Neuromuscular electrical stimulation during recovery from exercise: a systematic review. . . p. 2478–2506. .
View in Research Portal

Test-retest reliability of the 30-sec Wingate cycle test in a trained male cohort

Malone, J. K., Blake, C. & Caulfield, B. (2014) Test-retest reliability of the 30-sec Wingate cycle test in a trained male cohort. . . p. 251-258. .
View in Research Portal

2012

The physiological effects of low-intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on short-term recovery from supra-maximal exercise bouts in male triathletes

Malone, J. K., Coughlan, G. F., Crowe, L., Gissane, G. C. & Caulfield, B. (2012) The physiological effects of low-intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on short-term recovery from supra-maximal exercise bouts in male triathletes. . . p. 2421–2432. .
View in Research Portal

NMES is not effective as a recovery intervention between two bouts of maximal aerobic exercise

Malone, J. K., Blake, C. & Caulfield, B. (2012) NMES is not effective as a recovery intervention between two bouts of maximal aerobic exercise. . . p. 647. .
View in Research Portal

The physiological effects of low-intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation on short-term recovery from supra-maximal exercise bouts in an elite athlete – A case study

Malone, J. K., Coughlan, G., Crowe, L. & Caulfield, B. (2012) The physiological effects of low-intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation on short-term recovery from supra-maximal exercise bouts in an elite athlete – A case study. . . p. E24. .
View in Research Portal

2011

The physiological effects of low-intensity NMES on short-term recovery from supra-maximal exercise bouts in trained male triathletes

Malone, J. K., Coughlan, G. ., Crowe, L., Gissane, G. C. & Caulfield, B. (2011) The physiological effects of low-intensity NMES on short-term recovery from supra-maximal exercise bouts in trained male triathletes. . . p. 525. .
View in Research Portal

Cardiac output is not related to the slowed O2 uptake kinetics in type 2 diabetes

Mac Ananey, O., Malone, J. K., Warmington, S., O'Shea, D., Green, S. & Egana, M. (2011) Cardiac output is not related to the slowed O2 uptake kinetics in type 2 diabetes. . . p. 935-942. .
View in Research Portal

2010

The physiological effects of low-intensity NMES on short-term recovery from supra-maximal exercise bouts

Malone, J. K., Coughlan, G., Crowe, L. & Caulfield, B. (2010) The physiological effects of low-intensity NMES on short-term recovery from supra-maximal exercise bouts. In: Proceedings of the 1st Annual Conference of the UK and Republic of Ireland Chapter of the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society. Kenney, L. (ed.), Cooper, G. (ed.). p. 20. . University of Salford.
View in Research Portal

2006

Cardiorespiratory responses to near fatiguing sustained and intermittent isometric contractions of the quadriceps muscles

Egana, M., Crampton, D. ., Malone, J. K. & Warmington, S. (2006) Cardiorespiratory responses to near fatiguing sustained and intermittent isometric contractions of the quadriceps muscles. In: Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland, Biomedical Sciences, Summer Meeting: Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland, Biomedical Sciences. . 2006 ed., . Irish Journal of Medical Science.
View in Research Portal

More Information

Funding

Jan 2017:  The Carnegie Trust:  Research Incentive Grant (£7,500) - Project Title: Unsupervised Home-Based Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Training to Improve Physical Activity in Ageing Populations.  Outcome - Unsuccessful.

Feb 2016 - Euorpean Network for Joint Evaluation of Connect Health Technologies (ENJECT) - Short Term Scientific Missions (STSM) Travel Grant (€1,150).  Outcome - Succesful. 

 

Esteem

Reviewer:

  • Physical Therapy in Sport
  • Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
  • Research in Sports Medicine
  • BMC Neurology

Knowledge Exchange

July 4th 2017:  appeared on the TV programme 'How to Lose Weight Well', which is a Channel 4 production.  My role included discussing the use of neuromuscular elctrical stimulation (NMES) for weight loss. 

Feb 16th 2017:  presented a Short Term Scientific Missions (STSM) Case Report as part of the European Network for the Joint Evaluation of Connected Health Technologies (ENJECT) at their European Cooperation in Science and Technology (ECOST) workshop in Paris, France. The title of my presentation was 'Unsupervised Hame based Training to improve Physical Function in Ageing Populations', which is a collaborative research framework between Abertay University and University College Dublin.

April 4th 2014:   I presented my research to staff and students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas entitled: ‘Current perspectives on the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation as a recovery modality to enhance sports performance’.

2010 - 2012:  I presented my PhD research at 4 international conferences, including the ECSS conference in Liverpool (2011) and Bruges (2012).

Meet the rest of the team

Dr Scott Hardie

Dr Scott Hardie

Division of Sport and Exercise Sciences | Head of Division

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Ms Yvette Wharton

Ms Yvette Wharton

Division of Sport and Exercise Sciences | Lecturer

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