Dr Ashley Rogers

Lecturer

School School of Business, Law and Social Sciences

Department Division of Sociology

Contact info

+44 (0)1382 30 8720

Biography

Ashley Rogers is a Lecturer in Criminology and Criminal Justice. She has a BSC(Hons) in Criminology and Sociology (University of Stirling), MSc in Human Rights and International Politics (University of Glasgow, 2009) and a second MSc in Applied Social Research Methods (University of Stirling, funded by ESRC, 2013).

Ashley completed her ESRC-funded socio-legal PhD in December 2017, which explored the experiences of women victims of violence in Bolivia and the challenges they face when accessing justice. In particular, she focused on the implementation of Law 348 to Guarantee Women a Life Free from Violence. Her other work includes examining the needs of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children from both the perspective of the children themselves (a follow on from a previous role at the Scottish Refugee Council) and from Scottish local authority perspectives. In addition, she has become increasingly interested in environmental issues and recently visited Malawi to investigate access to water and community resilience. This growing interest is particularly in relation to the notion of climate justice, responsibility and redistribution, and in turn, green criminology.

Her teaching emphasises the need to critically consider dominant conceptualisations and discourses of crime, drawing attention to crimes of the powerful including, but not limited to: state-corporate crime; human trafficking; criminalisation of immigration and border policing; hate crime and dismantling the privilege embedded within discourses of 'free speech'; violence against women and girls, and the crime of femicide; environmental crime and green criminology; penal practices and abolitionism. As a largely qualitative research, she also teaches primarily on ethnographic and creative methodologies.

Find more of Ashley on Twitter: @DrAshleyRogers

View Publications

  • Race, Ethnicity and Immigration
    • Colonialism, post-war migration, white privilege, processes of racialisation, criminalisation of migration, hate crime, seeking asylum and refugee processes
  • Criminal Justice Processes
    • Gender and crime, ethnicity and crime, young people and crime, critical perspectives on policing¬†
  • Crime and Punishment
    • The problem with statistics and an introduction to crimes of the powerful
  • Penal Institutions
    • Prisons in crisis, abolitionsm, harms of imprisonment, critical perspectives on the purpose of prison, prisons and families of those imprisoned, foreign national prisoners, women and prison
  • Policing and Justice in the 21st Century
    • Human trafficking and smuggling, policing borders, prostition, tansnational organised crime, state-corporate crime, drug trafficking
  • Honours Project (Research)
    • Ethnographic methods (including participant observation, interviewing, writing fieldnotes, writing ethographically, ethics, delineating the 'field'

Interests

Legal consciousness
Human rights
Justice
Women's rights
Social justice
Climate justice
Indigenous knowledges
Ethnography
Bolivia
Southern criminology
Malawi
Water rights

View Publications

Meet the rest of the team

Dr James Moir

Dr James Moir

Division of Sociology | Senior Lecturer

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Dr Nuala Killeen

Dr Nuala Killeen

Division of Sociology | Lecturer

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