BA (Hons) Criminology and Sociology

Get set to have your understanding of contemporary criminological and social issues challenged and developed on this fascinating Criminology and Sociology course. Our Criminology degrees are ranked top 10 in the UK for course satisfaction (The Guardian Guide 2022).

Course detail

Start Date

September

Duration

4 years (full-time)

Award Title

BA (Hons)

UCAS Code

M9L3

Programme Overview

This thought-provoking Criminology and Sociology degree covers everything from addiction and criminalisation to human rights and death. You'll learn how to think critically about how people engage and interact with the world around them. 

Criminology and Sociology is a flexible degree. For the first two years, everyone studies the same curriculum. In years three and four our academics help you explore areas such as:

  • Gender, crime and victimology.
  • Race and ethnicity.
  • The process of criminalisation.
  • Human rights and politics.

After the first two years of study, you can choose to specialise in other areas or carry on studying this pathway. See more in the 'How the Course Works' section below.

You will receive a strong grounding in theory and research methods, along with training in specialist data-analysis software. This degree equips you to succeed in developing your critical thinking skills and enhancing your employability, opening up a wide variety of career options.

Our Criminology degree scored 85% for Teaching and Learning Resources in the 2020 National Student Survey. Plus, Abertay is widely regarded as THE place to come for high quality teaching. But don't just take our word for it:

  • UK University of the Year for Teaching Quality (The Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide 2021).
  • UK Top 10 for Student Satisfaction & Teaching (Guardian University Guide 2021).
  • UK Top 10 for Student Satisfaction (National Student Survey 2020).

Study crime from every angle

Your Criminology and Sociology degree will put you at the forefront of the critical social debates defining the 21st century, from crime and addiction to human rights and climate change.

This covers all aspects of crime, so you’ll learn how it is defined, controlled and regulated in modern societies. 

You will deep dive into key criminal issues and learn about the relationship between crime, society, politics, media and criminal justice policy.

Potential Careers 

We are extremely proud of our alumni, who have gone into a variety of different roles such as:

  • Community development worker
  • Crime scene investigator
  • Detective
  • Police officer
  • Police staff
  • Prison officer
  • Probation officer
  • Social worker
  • Youth worker
  • Teacher
Person wearing white plastic suit and face mask

About Your Modules

All modules shown are indicative and reflect course content for the current academic year. Modules are reviewed annually and may be subject to change. If you receive an offer to study with us we will send you a Programme document  that sets out exactly which modules you can expect to take as part of your Abertay University degree programme. Please see Terms and Conditions for more information.

Modules

Year 1 Core Modules

You must study and pass all six core modules

Brief description

Key concepts regarding crime and punishment, how they are understood and represented in society and what impact this understanding of crime can have.

Module content:

  • The meaning of crime, deviance and punishment: What do we mean by crime, deviance and punishment? How and why do different societies define certain behaviours as criminal whilst others do not? External and internal social control; the problem of social order; conformity and deviance.
  • The extent of crime and deviance: The incidence of crime; How reliable are official statistics on crime? Who commits most crime? Are official statistics on crime useful? How do we ‘talk’ about crime and define criminal behaviour?
  • Crimes of the powerful: Exploring the dark figure of crime: uncovering the implications of dominant constructions of criminality. What crimes exist that we know very little about? Why might that be? Includes engagement with crimes of the powerful including state corporate crime and human trafficking.
  • Inequality and crime: The meaning of Criminalisation and an examination of aspects of this, including an examination of the shift from criminalising HARM to criminalising OFFENCE.

Brief description

A sociological examination of key contemporary social issues, challenges and problems.

Module content:

  • Social inequality and social division: Social class and social mobility; race, ethnicity and multiculturalism; gender and identity.
  • Globalization and globality: Media and culture; identity, nation-states and globalization; terrorism and political conflict.
  • Social life and everyday life: The life-course; families and family life; interactionism; education.

Brief description

The fundamental areas of civil law.

Module content:

  • Legal systems: The nature of law; the distinction between civil and criminal law; sources of law; the structure of the courts; impact of EU law on Scots law.
  • Contract: Nature and formation; essential features and validity; terms of the contract; breach of contract; extinction of contractual obligations.
  • Delict: Nature of delict; culpa and negligence; strict and vicarious liability; Consumer Protection Act 1987; defences to an action in delict.
  • Criminal law: Principles of Scots criminal law. Requirements for men’s rea and actus rues and causation. An introduction to the main features of selected crimes against the person such as homicide and assault (including common law and statutory aggravations). Selected defences to crimes against the person. Exculpating and mitigating factors.

Brief description

Introduction to the criminal justice system and processes in Britain. Examine how the criminal justice system operates, its key agencies and processes, as well as their relationship with the wider institutions, structures and issues in modern society. Consider theories of and debates concerning crime and criminal justice and how these have influenced the history and development of the criminal justice system.

Module content:

  • The criminal justice system: What is criminal justice? Is there a criminal justice 'system'? General characteristics, themes and principles; theories and approaches to crime prevention and crime control; crime control models vs 'due process' models; criminal justice in Scotland.
  • Key agencies: The role, functions and working practices of the main agencies operating within the criminal justice system (e.g. the police, courts, prisons and probation services) and the processes involved from arrest to probation.
  • Social power, inequality and criminal justice: Youth crime and justice; race and institutional racism; gender and crime; crime and criminalisation.

Brief description

The processes of social change within European history. Trace the dynamic interplay of politics, science, technology, economy, art, culture and ideas that has defined the epochs of classical antiquity, feudalism, early modernity and capitalist modernity.

Module content:

  • Lectures: Lectures will be divided into four distinct sections that cover the following historical epochs: classical antiquity, feudalism, early modernity and capitalist modernity. Lectures will cover the social structure, economy, politics, science, technology, ideas and culture of the historical epoch concerned and the processes of historical change that led to its breakdown and supersession by another type of socio-political formation.
  • Tutorials: Tutorials will be of a traditional format centred around the discussion of readings from the core texts, related videos and library exercises - they will also offer guidance regarding the assessment requirements.
  • Introduction and conclusion: In the first week there will be an Introduction to the module and a lecture that focuses on the question ‘What is history?’ In the final week there will be an exam revision session.

Brief description

The purpose of this module is to enable you to recognise the steps you need to take to ensure you achieve academic success.

Indicative content

  • The new challenge of studying in HE: Expectations of a student in higher education.
  • Successful student behaviours: Academic excellence is only part of a successful university experience.  Find out more about wider integration through your University community.
  • Sense of purpose and Abertay attributes: Recognising the opportunity that university offers and starting to think about where this might lead and how you might determine that direction, whether that be career or further study.
  • Reflections on personal strengths and challenges: Preparatory work to consider what those strengths and challenges might be.
  • Formative Diagnostic engagement: Diagnostic tool can be taken on multiple occasions as student engages with developmental process.
  • Growth and moving forward: How could you act upon this information?  What resources are available to support your development?
  • Action planning: How to create an action plan and measure your success in meeting it
  • Summative assessment: Create action plan and identify schedule of microcredentials to study in year one.

Year 1 MySuccess Modules - Term 1

You must study and pass three MySuccess modules of your choosing

Brief description 

Learn to understand the fundamentals of writing at university, including how to find the specific language for your subject and how to “sound academic” when you write. 

Indicative content

  • Finding the right words: Why having a big vocabulary is vital if you want to be a good writer. Introduction to the Academic Word List. How to build your subject vocabulary
  • Learning the style: What lecturers mean by “academic style”. How to learn the rules of academic writing. Why these vary in different subjects and different assignments
  • The connection between the right language and avoiding plagiarism: What we mean by “the right language” in writing. Some fundamental rules you need to remember. How this helps you to paraphrase (and why that’s vital). 
  • Being a guide for your reader: Why a clear structure is key to a good grade. How to lead your reader through your writing. How to make your writing “flow”.
  • Persuading your reader you’re right: Why all academic writing is persuasive writing. The importance of evidence. How to present your arguments and back them up

Brief description 

An introduction to the key digital capabilities you need for your studies. 

Indicative content

  • Map current skills: Identify current strengths against a range of digital skills students will need at university and are also sought by employers.  Create a plan to develop your digital skills journey using an online platform.
  • Digital Learning Environment: Identify tools including assistive technologies which will help you organise your learning and ensure your devices are efficient and secure.
  • Institutional Systems: Understand how to engage with institutional tools such as MyLearningSpace, MS Teams, OASIS, MyAbertay Dashboard and Calendar
  • Digital Communication and Collaboration: Use different types of online communication to communicate with other students and your lecturers.  Understand how learning networks are used professionally.
  • Digital Learning and Development: Understand how to develop skills in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Forms and OneDrive skills to an advanced level by gaining software provider accreditation.
  • Digital Creativity and Problem solving: Use appropriate tools to create and edit digital content, including multimedia while respecting copyright. 
  • Digital Identity: Identify effective use of social media to present a positive digital identify. 

Brief description 

Take a guided tour of our location, heritage, culture, industry and innovations, find out how you can get involved, and what’s on our horizon.

Indicative content

  • Location: We will explore the geography that makes Dundee’s setting “probably more extraordinary than any other city in the UK. It is about as ideal – ludicrously ideal – as any setting could be.” – Stephen Fry. Did you know there is an extinct volcano in the city centre? and why our city is known as #SunnyDundee (one of the sunniest cities in Scotland)… It’s all down to geography…
  • Heritage:  The 3 ‘J’s – Jute, jam and journalism… the industrial foundations of modern Dundee – our link with the world through international trade (e.g. Dundee does not grow oranges – so how did we get to be famous for our Dundee marmalade?). Dennis the menace and his Beano pals will have a tale to tell you … and the McManus galleries hold many a local secret for you to uncover (find the Tay Whale).
  • Industry and innovation: A city of innovation and reinvention… with lots of innovation over the centuries in Dundee, we will explore the Recent: Biomed, computer games… And the Future: MSIP, Eden project, E-Games arena. One of the first places in the UK to have Green health prescriptions (and we have lots of parks!)
  • Culture: Take a ‘virtual’ trip to Antarctica on RRS Discovery, explore the history of industry at Verdant works, marvel at the displays in the V&A, dance at the Dundee rep, soak in culture at Dundee Contemporary Arts, and marvel at developments in medicine, engineering, environment and more at Dundee science centre…
  • Take part: Dundee is a friendly city, we say hello we help each other, we have lots of communities large and small. Discover how Abertay fits into the city and how you can too.

Brief description 

Take the first step on your journey towards becoming an independent, confident and accomplished information literate student in your chosen subject area, gaining an understanding of the fundamental skills you will need for research both at University and in lifelong learning.

Indicative content

  • Getting started: Identifying the ‘knowledge gap’ and the information needed to fill it: why information literacy matters. 
  • Understanding Information sources: How scholarly information is generated and disseminated; key characteristics of different information types (e.g. print/electronic, primary/ secondary, bibliographic/full-text, open access/paywall).
  • Searching for information: Planning, using and refining appropriate search strategies; online search tools (Google vs specialist services); using a range of web and database search functionality (e.g. truncation, phrasing, filters)
  • Evaluating information: Using appropriate quality criteria to critically evaluate information from any source to determine authority and bias.
  • Referencing: Understanding what is meant by academic integrity, plagiarism and the need for appropriate referencing; creating reference lists and in-text citations; use of referencing tools to manage information.

Brief description 

Learn how to present and persuade a targeted audience that an idea is beneficial – presenting a clear and well-supported message or point of view to influence a decision.

Indicative content

  • What is visual communication and why is it important? Overview of forms of visual communication as a tool to convey an idea, concept, design thinking or project and why it is important to present in a simple and inspirational way to deliver impact to a chosen target audience.
  • Let’s go mood boarding! How to gather, distil and present focused visual information for an idea, concept, design thinking or project on a mood board in a simple and engaging format to a chosen target audience.
  • What is persuasive writing and why is it important? Overview of structuring written communication to persuasively present a clear and well supported idea or point of view (evidence) including counter views to influence a decision by a target audience.

Brief description 

Gain an early opportunity to start planning your personal and career development for your life beyond University. 

Indicative content

  • The new challenge of knowing the future now: What will the future look like for me and what can I do to prepare? Videos, presentations and interactive activities sessions on a range of topics and concepts to help provide a wider context for self-development.
  • Who am I? Use of a range online interactive online self-assessment tools and activities used to create your own personal profile and benchmark your own career readiness.
  • My current personal profile and my future-(professional) self:  Using results and data from self-assessment tools to create personal profile. You're Introduced to the Career Management Cycle model as an approach to personal development, interactive self-reflection and for planning suitable personal goals. 
  • Mind the Gap: Use of positive case studies from previous students/graduates. (Where are they now?) To help inspire and raise your career aspirations. 
  • Growth and moving forward: Set out your next steps based on a range of opportunities available to do so. 
  • Decoding the jargon: Decode the jargon terms used in education/employment/work /careers. 
  • Action planning: Use of SMART technique in setting personal goals.

Brief description 

Experience first-hand what Abertay has to offer and further embed yourself as a member of the Abertay community.

Indicative content

  • Student Representation: The student voice is important to both us and the University. We value your opinions, and our reps allow us to hear it. Learn all about our Class reps, Division reps and Community reps. The University also delivers the Lead Voices, which recruits students to advocate the voices of students belonging to protected characteristics.
  • Societies: Societies are student led and student organised. Find out more about societies: what they do, the committee structure, society council and the skills you can gain from being part of a society. If you don'tt see something you like, then you can learn how to create a society of your own.
  • Sports: Whether you're interested in competitive level or looking for a social activity, there are a variety of sports clubs to join. Learn about our different sports clubs, the Sports Union, their committees and physical activities the University has to offer. There are several links between physical activity and wellbeing including mental health which will also be discussed.
  • Peer Mentoring: The Abertay Peer Mentoring programme connects students to other students. Abertay Mentors are experienced students who are keen to support the academic and personal success of others.
  • Enterprise: Bell Street Ventures is the University’s centre for enterprise who offer workshops, resources and consultation. Open to students and graduates whether you want to start a business, change the world or choose who you want to work with as a freelancer.

Brief description 

Gain the knowledge and awareness of techniques and behaviours that are known to positively influence ongoing wellbeing.

Indicative content

  • Course overview: Introduction to the course and to the underpinning theory.
  • Connecting: Consideration of the value of building strong social relationships and Identifying ways of becoming more connected at Abertay and within local communities.
  • Being active: Highlighting the benefits of becoming physically active and providing examples of how this might be achieved from different starting points and circumstances.
  • Taking notice: Introducing useful techniques such as mindfulness and grounding.
  • Learning: Explaining the link between learning and wellbeing and showcasing a range of opportunities open to Abertay students.
  • Giving: Exploring the value of giving in different contexts and flagging options as an Abertay student, including peer mentoring, Student Association involvement and volunteering opportunities.
  • Course summary and next steps: Creating an action plan to adopt the behaviours above.
  • Summative assessment: An online quiz structured around the five elements above.

 

Year 2 Core Modules

You must study and pass all five core modules

Brief description

This module addresses the emergence and development of key criminological perspectives of continuing relevance for the understanding of crime and processes of criminalization.

Module content:

  • Challenging criminological positivism: Labelling perspectives, Marxism and crisis, The New Criminology / Radical Criminology
  • Theorizing and managing crime and criminality
    Left realism, Right realism, Control theories, Situational crime prevention
  • Innovation in criminological theory
    Feminist criminology, Critical criminology / Green Criminology, Cultural criminology

Brief description

This module is intended to introduce the work of three key social theorists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, Karl Marx, Max Weber and Emile Durkheim. Their work is used to critically illustrate the nature of capitalist modernity and the foundations of contemporary sociological theory and practice.

Module content:

  • KARL MARX: Capitalism, Workers` Movement and The Communist Manifesto (1848); Dialectics, Fetishism and the Purpose of Critique; Value, Labour, Money; Capital, Surplus Value and Exploitation; Primitive Accumulation, the Logic of Separation and the Question of Crisis; Class Struggle, Revolution and Communism.
  • MAX WEBER: Introduction: contextual overview and biography; The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism; Conception of sociology and methodology; Bureaucratisation and rationalisation; Class, status and party; Political sociology: power, legitimacy and the state.
  • EMILE DURKHEIM: Introduction: contextual overview and biography; The Rules of Sociological Method; Suicide; The Division of Labour in Society; Morality and Religion; Crime, Deviance and the Law.

Year 2 Elective Modules - Term 2

You must study and pass one elective module of your choosing

Year 3 Core Modules

You must study and pass all four core modules

Brief description

Examine the relationship between gender and crime.

Module content:

  • The feminist critique of criminology: The emergence of the feminist critique and the challenge to the feminine 'other'.
  • Women and crime: The pattern of women's crime. Deviance, femininity and the response to female transgression.
  • Men and crime: Masculinity and crime, crime as structured action, crime as a resource for doing gender. The situational context and crime.

Brief description

This is a social theory module. It is not a history or biography of great thinkers. It encourages students to read closely the arguments of leading schools of social theory and develop their analytical capacities by discussing and further elaborating some of the main developments in social thought over the past half century or so.

Module content:

  • Norbert Elias and the Civilizing Process: The Civilizing Process in Context; The State and the De-Civilizing Process.
  • The Frankfurt School and Critical Theory: Traditional and Critical Theory; Walter Benjamin: `Theses on the Philosophy of History'.
  • Relational Sociology of Pierre Bourdieu `The Real is Relational': Habitus, Doxa, Field and Capital; Bourdieu and the Field of Culture;
  • Foucault: History, Power, Knowledge; Discipline and Punish.
  • Postmodernism: Postmodernism & Postmodernity; Habermas: Rejecting Postmodernism and Reconstructing Modernity.

Brief description

This module will examine the history of race and racism in 19th, 20th and 21st century Britain, from the 'Scramble for Africa' through the postwar/post-colonial period to the present. It will examine the various forces, processes and discourses through which race, ethnicity and the racialised subject have been constructed, shaped and changed. It will also examine theoretical approaches to and debates about race and ethnicity, racism, race relations and anti-racism, and how these have developed in response to both historical developments and social-political activism.

Module content:

  • The Concept and Construction of Race and Ethnicity: This section will look at the concept and construction of race and ethnicity, and the production of racial knowledge from the colonial period to the present.
  • Race, Ethnicity and Nation: This section will examine the (re)construction and relationship between race, ethnicity and nation in Britain in light of postwar/ post-colonial immigration and the end of empire.
  • Race, Ethnicity and Identity: This section will examine the politics, construction and expression of racial and ethnic identities in post-colonial Britain in response to colonialism, migration, discrimination and racism.
  • Race and Class: This section will examine the relationship between race and class as sites of social-political identification, power, inequality, political struggle and analysis, as well as debates over which is the most effective framework for analysis and activism.
  • Race and Gender: This section will examine the relationship between race and gender as sites of social-political identification, power, inequality, political struggle and analysis, as well as debates over which is the most effective framework for analysis and activism.
  • Race, Crime, Civil Unrest and Political Protest: This section will examine the relationship (within analysis and representation) between race, the law, crime, civil unrest and political protest against socioeconomic conditions, policing and state policy.
  • Anti-Racism, Race Relations and Multiculturalism: This section will examine the history and development of anti-racist and race relations discourses, activism, strategies and legislation, how they have attempted to combat forms of racism, discrimination and inequality, and debates surrounding them.
  • Race, Ethnicity and the Politics of Popular Culture: This section will examine popular culture (e.g. music, film or television) in terms of postcolonial cultural politics, multiculturalism, representation, identity and political activism.

Brief description

The prison system, the experience of imprisonment and penal policy and practice in the UK. Learn about developments in penal policy and practice, the lived experience of imprisonment and consider alternatives to imprisonment.

Module content:

  • Contemporary developments in penal theory, policy and practice: Penal institutions in contemporary society. The crises of legitimacy in penal institutions. Reorganisation and reform. Privatisation of the prison system.
  • Prison life the reality: ‘Doing time’ the actuality of prison life, the ‘total institution’? Strategies for survival, regime activities, ‘banged up’ prisoners, prison staff and civilian staff. Dealing with social exclusion. The diversity of the prison population. Stratification and power within prisons.
  • Alternatives to imprisonment the way forward?: Reducing risk or protecting the public? Reducing fear of crime? Human or humane containment and warehousing. Therapeutic prisons. Electronic tagging, community service orders, mediation/reparation.
  • Attitudes to imprisonment: Why do we have prisons? Why are they at the centre of penal policy? Are they culturally ‘acceptable’? Abolitionism.
  • Foreign nationals: Detention centres; foreign national prisoners and race relations in prisons; are immigration detention centres new types of penal establishments; critical issues surrounding foreign national prisoners in the UK.

Year 3 Option Modules 

You must study and pass one option module of your choosing in Term 2

Brief description

Criminological and sociological perspectives on drug governance and addiction

Module content:

  • Historical, political and social contexts of drugs consumption and governance: Historical contexts in the growth of drug consumption and its governance. State and criminal justice drugs policy in the UK. 12 step and other recovery movements.
  • Theorising addiction: Freedom, compulsion and willpower. Neuropharmacology (and its critics) the social construction of addiction. Sociological approaches.
  • Case studies: Heroin and opioids. Smoking and anti-smoking. Alcohol.

Brief description

Work placement where students will spend a specified time working in an area or on a project related to their programme either in the physical business environment or remotely communicating through digital platforms (eg Microsoft teams, ZOOM etc).

Module content: 

  • Placement preparation: Attend placement workshops (no more than 2 x 1 hour) in semester one in order to prepare for the placement, including CV preparation. Discuss with placement tutor placement options.
  • Placement briefing: Responsibilities of all parties involved; expectations; professional conduct. of placement; requirements of professional conduct.
  • Experiential Learning: Supervised Placement carried out 1 day per week for 10 weeks (preferred structure) or 10 day block; feedback; employer assessment, student reflection on performance while on placement. while on placement.
  • Placement check: Discussions will take place between the placement tutor, student and employer to ensure satisfactory progress is being made.
  • Placement presentation: Poster presentation focused on student's placement learning and employability skills development, and on learning through experience to peers and employers. Poster presentation focused on student's placement learning and employability skills development, and on learning through experience to peers and employers. learning and employability skills development, and on learning through experience to peers and employers.
  • Business Investigation/Business project: Research within the placement organisation, a business/management issue, or participate in a workplace project and report on the findings/outcomes.

Year 4 Core Modules

You must study and pass all three core modules

Brief description

Conduct and present a simple investigation into a sociological topic of their choice, the result of which is a 10,000 word dissertation.

Module content:

  • Research design: Selecting the appropriate method for a specified topic and conducting actual research - with guidance from project supervisor.
  • Reviewing literature: Collecting evidence within relevant field of research and its application to the field of study.
  • Analysing and interpreting data: Collecting, dealing with and understanding data; turning data into words and/or numbers - with guidance from project supervisor.
  • Presenting findings: Making research findings ‘public’; writing-up your project - with guidance from project supervisor.

Brief description

This advanced level module will focus on the question of power in modern societies - the key theme which lies at the heart of political sociology. The module is divided into four inter- connected sections: sociological and political theories of power; social configurations of power; alternative visions of power relations; and social movements and the contestation of power.

Module content:

  • Lectures: The lecture programme is divided into four key sections: Sociological and political theories of power; States, citizenship, rights and the law; Alternative visions of power relations - utopia and dystopia; Contesting power - social movements and political protest.
  • Tutorials: Students will be required to read set literature each week and to bring notes and points of contention from lectures to tutorials for discussion.

Year 4 Option Modules

You must study and pass two option modules of your choosing – one in Term 1 and one in Term 2

Brief description

Changing attitudes to death, dying and killing. The connections between power and the right to take or preserve life, how death and killing are represented and legitimated in various contexts.

Module content:

  • The death-denial thesis: Changing ideas of death and dying from pre-modernity to postmodernity Death denial and ambivalence the sequestration of death The ‘revival’ of death.
  • Social, political and legal constructions of death: State crime and deviance, militarism.
  • Death and representation: Conflict, commemoration and public memorialising; Death and popular culture, representations of war and death in news.
  • Death and power: The social mechanisms of oppression, consent and legitimation that determine when, how and why people kill and die; Terror Genocide.
  • Bioethics and politics: The sanctity of life versus the quality of life; The politics of ‘ethical’ decisions about life and death; Capital punishment.

Brief description

The significance of human rights in the world today. Gain a grounding in human rights from a social theoretical perspective, including current debates and trends in human rights.

Module content:

  • History and theory of human rights: Classical origins in Greece and Rome. Classical liberal thought. The French and American Revolutions. Marx. Critical social theory. Postcolonialism.
  • Human rights in transition: Human rights in armed conflict. Responsibility to protect. Refugees and asylum seekers. Genocide and torture. The International Criminal Court.

How the Course Works

This degree is part of a larger portfolio of three courses covering Criminology, Policing and Sociology. 

The first two years of each course follow the same curriculum. This initial two-year curriculum covers the fundamentals of criminology and sociology, recognising the deep interplay between the two.

Our two-year foundation approach means you can keep your options open until you’ve learnt more about what really interests you. Having gained two years of knowledge, at the end of year two you choose from one of these pathways: 

Your chosen course will be reflected in your degree title e.g. BSc (Hons) Criminology and Policing. And, of course, we’re here to help if you need help deciding which path to take.

Remember, you only need to apply for ONE course, as the first two years are the same for everyone.

The pathways are new for 2022, so are for students applying for year one only. Anyone applying for years two or three should email admissions@abertay.ac.uk for full details.

 

Teaching and Assessment

You’ll learn through a blend of lectures, tutorials, seminars, workshops, online discussion forums, video screenings, guest speaker presentations, directed and private study, and student-focussed group work.

Other assessment methods include supervised examinations, essays, reports, portfolios, presentations, project work, class and online tests, and reflective analyses. In your final year, you’ll design and produce a research project under the dedicated supervision of a member of academic staff.

Around one third of the course is assessed through examination, although the exact proportion depends on your module choices.

Put simply, we aim to give you all the skills you need to move straight into a job or further study when you graduate.

Entry Requirements

All applicants must have passes in English and Maths - National 5 English grade C or GCSE grade C/4 or equivalent. National 5 ESOL is accepted in lieu of National 5 English. National 5 Lifeskill Maths/Applications of Maths/National 4 Maths/National 4 Lifeskill Maths or Chemistry, Biology or Physics IS accepted in lieu of Maths. GCSE Maths or numerate subject such as Science, Biology, Chemistry at grade C/4.

Higher Application of Maths at grade C accepted.

Below are the literate subjects we accept for entry on this course:

One of the following: Business Management; Classical Studies; Economics; English; ESOL; Geography; History; Media Studies; Modern Studies; Philosophy; Politics; Psychology; Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies; Sociology

If there is a subject that does not appear, please contact our Admissions Office (admissions@abertay.ac.uk) who will be able to confirm whether or not it would be considered for entry.

Please visit our Entry from College pages for suitable College courses.

Republic of Ireland applicants, click on the UK tabs and scroll down to find your Entry Requirements.

See information about studying and applying to Abertay for International students.

Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
Higher (standard entry) ABBB Literate subject
Higher (minimum entry) We may make you an offer at the minimum entry grades if you meet the criteria. Find out if you're eligible for minimum entry (see below). BBC Literate subject at B
A-Level BCC Literate subject
Irish Highers H2H3H3H3 Literate subject
International Baccalaureate 29 Points Literate subject at S5 or H4
BTEC Extended Diploma DMM Health & Social Care/Public Services/Travel & Tourism
AHEAD   Successful completion of the relevant stream of our AHEAD programme
SWAP ABB Access to: Humanities, Arts & Humanities and Primary Education, University Study, Community, Education & Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences and Primary Teaching, Languages, Arts & Social Science, Degree Studies, Celtic Studies
SQA HNC/HND A Our Entry from College pages list approved HNC courses​
BTEC HNC D Health & Social Care
Qualification Type Grade Requirements Essential Subjects
Advanced Higher ABB One from Sociology, Politics, History, Psychology, Modern Studies plus one other literate subject
A-Level ABB To include Sociology, Politics, History, Psychology plus one other literate subject
International Baccalaureate 34 Points Two from Social and Cultural Anthropology, Global Politics , History, or Psychology plus one other Higher subject
SQA HNC/HND A/AA Our Entry from College pages list approved HNC courses
BTEC HND D Health & Social Care

We accept a wide range of qualifications from applicants from across the world. Please select your country from the searchable list below to view different qualification entry requirements. If you have different qualifications to those listed, please contact us using the form below.

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Academic Requirements

Applicants will typically be required to achieve BCC at A-Level, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma with an overall score of 29 points, to include any essential subject(s) at S5 or H4.

English language: English B at S5 or H4 is accepted. For English A, no grade is specified. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically require a High School GPA of 3.0, plus one of the following:

  • SAT (I) score of 1150
  • 3 AP Tests at grades 433
  • 3 SAT Subject Tests at 600
  • ACT Composite score of 26

A combination of AP/SAT II tests may be used, provided they are in different subjects.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) with 6 units as follows: 1 unit at II, 3 units at III, 2 units at IV, to include any essential subject(s) at III.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the European Baccalaureate with an overall grade of 73%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

English language: English Language 1 at grade 6 or English Language 2 at grade 7 are accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomë e Maturës Shtetëore with an overall grade of 8.0, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Technique / Commercial with an overall grade of 15, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat de l'Enseignement Secondaire with an overall grade of 15, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants with national school qualilfications will typically be required to pass the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 13/20, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Trayecto Técnico Profesional with an overall grade of 7.0, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Técnico Superior/Universitario with an overall grade of 7.0, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Araratian Baccalaureate at Extended Level with grades BBC, to include any essential subjects.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary General Education wih an average of 13 and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 66%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Year 12 Certificate plus ATAR rank of 80 or Overall Position of 9, to include any essential subject(s) at Year 12 with grade B, grade 3 or Sound Achievement.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Reifeprüfung/Maturazeugnis with an overall grade of 2.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

English language: English at grade 2 in the Reifeprüfung/Maturazeugnis is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Tam Orta Tahsil Hazzinda Aggestat with an average of 4, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 68%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Shahadat Al-Thanawaya Al-Aama/General Secondary Education Certificate with an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree or post-secondary diploma in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70% or 2.75 (on the 4 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Intermediate/Higher Secondary School Certificate at an average of 2.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 55% or B-, to include any essential subject(s) at 60% or grade B.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of General Secondary Education at an average of 6, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 6.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur with an overall average of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma van secundair onderwijs with an overall average of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Abschlusszeugnis der Oberstufe des Sekundarunterrichts with an overall average of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma de Bachiller at 64%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 70%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Certificate of Secondary Education at an average of 4.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificado de Conculsão de Segundo Grau with an average score of 8.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.0.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificado de Conclusão de Ensino Médio with an average score of 8.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.0.

Applicants will typically be required to pass Brunei A Levels in 3 subjects at grades BCC, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma za Sredno Obrazonvanie with an average score of 4.75, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma of Upper Secondary Education at average of C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 67%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalaureat or Baccalaureat Technique at an overall grade of 13, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 12.

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Secondary School Diploma or Diplôme d'Études Collégiales with five grade 12 subjects at an average of 70%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Licencia de Education at an average of 4.5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 5.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to complete Senior Middle/High School Certificate/Diploma at an average of 77%, to include any essential subject(s) at 77%; and pass GAOKAO with 550 points (based on the 750 points scheme).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Bachiller Academico at an average of 3.25, and the first year of a university degree or Tecnico Universitario in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Svjedodžba o Maturi with an overall grade of 3.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Apolytírio Lykeíou with an overall grade of 17.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 17.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vysvědčení o maturitní zkoušce with an overall grade of 2.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Studentereksamen (STX), including 3 Level A subjects an overall grade of 7, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

English language: Studentereksamen English Level A or B at grade 7 is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Bachiller at an average of 7.0, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 14 / 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Gumaasiumi lõputunnistus with an average score of 3.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4; and pass 3 state examinations at a minimum of 60% (or 2 states examinations plus C1 Advanced English CAE or IELTS).

English language: 75% in the English state examination is accepted, or C1 Advanced English CAE or IELTS (overall score 6.0 with no band lower than 5.5). For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Studentsprogv at an overall grade of 7, to include any essential subject(s) at Level A grade 7.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Ylioppilastutkinto/Studentexamen at an overall grade 4.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

English language: Advanced English at grade 5 within the Ylioppilastutkinto/Studentexamen is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Général/Professionnel/Technologique at an overall grade 12.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 13.

English language. English at grade 14 in the Baccalauréat Général/Professionnel/Technologique is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Option Internationale du Baccalauréat at an overall grade 11.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 13.

English language. English at grade 13 in the Option Internationale du Baccalauréat is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the NECO in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 60%/2.70, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%/2.70.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the NECO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the WAEC in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 60%/2.70, to include any essential subject(s) at 60%/2.70.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the WAEC is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sashualo Skolis Atestati (Secondary School Certificate) at an average grade of 7, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Shualo Specialuri Sastsavleblis Diplomi (Special School Leaving Diploma) at an average grade of 7, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Abitur with an overall grade of 2.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 11.

English language: Abitur English at grade 10 is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the NECO in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of B/55%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade B/55%.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the NECO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the WAEC in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of B/55%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade B/55%.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the WAEC is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Greek Apolytirion of Geniko Lykeio at grade 17.5 and 3 Pan-Hellenic exams at an average of 16.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 17.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Hong Kong HKDSE at 3333 in 4 core subjects, with elective subjects at 433 (for 3 electives) or 44 (for 2 electives), to include any essential subject(s) at 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Érettségi Bizonyítvány at an overall grade 4.2, with 2 higher subjects at grade 4, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Stúdentspróf at an overall grade 6.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 6.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Indian Senior School (Year 12) exam at an average of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan/Madrasah Aliyah (SMK / MA) at 78%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Post School Qualification Diploma 1 at 2.5, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants from Ireland should check the UK Year 1 Entry tab for entry requirements with Irish Highers.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Te'udat Bagrut or Bagrut with at least 2 subjects at level 5 and 1 subject at level 4 at an average of 65%, to include any essential subject(s) at Level 5 with 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma di Esame di Stato at 75%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8 (on the 10 point scale) or grade 16 (on the 20 point scale).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Upper Secondary School Leaving Certificate at grade 3.75, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Completed Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 75% / 2.67, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) at an average of B, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 55%, to include any essential subject(s) at 55%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.6, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Atestas par vispārējo vidējo izglītību with an average score of 7.5, to include 3 state exams at a minimum of 75%, to include any essential subject(s) at 70%.

English language: 80% in the English state exam is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Baccalauréat Libanais or Baccalauréat II with 14, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 12.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Brandos Atestatas with an average score of 7.5 with a minimum of 75% in 3 state exams, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.

English language: 80% in the English state exam is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplôme de Fin d'Études Secondaires at an overall grade of 44, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 44.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Higher Secondary Education with 73%, to include any essential subject(s) at 73%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Ensino Secundário Complementar with grade 2.8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Cambridge Overseas Higher School Certificate (COHSC) with grades BCC, to include any essential subject(s) at grade C.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Malawian School Certificate of Education at grade 5, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 65%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM) with a minimum of 3 subjects at BBC or 2.67 GPA, to include any essential subject(s) at grade B/3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Unified Examination Certificate (UEC) with 4 subjects at 75% / A2 B5 B5 B5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 75%/B5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Matriculation Certificate Examination with grades BB at Advanced level and BCCC at Intermediate level, to include any essential subject(s) at Advanced level grade C.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomă de Bacalaureat with an overall grade of 7.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary Education at 70%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 75%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Higher Secondary Education Certificate (HSC) with 68%, to include any essential subject(s) at 65%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Voorbereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO) with an overall score of 7.0, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

English language: English at grade 8 in HAVO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the NECO in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.0 or 55%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.0 or 55%.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the NECO is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the WAEC in at least five subjects at an average of B/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.0/55%, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.0/55%.

English language: English at C6 or higher in the WAEC is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Secondary School Leaving Diploma/Matura with an overall grade of 3.75, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vitnemål for Vidergaende Opplaering with an overall average of 3.8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

English language: English at grade 4 in the Vitnemål for Vidergaende Opplaering is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Higher Secondary School Certificate at an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 64%/3.0, to include any essential subject(s) at 68%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Matura with an average score of 65%, to include 3 Advanced subjects at a minimum of 50%, to include any essential subject(s) at Advanced level with a score of 70%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma/Certificado Nível Secundário de Educação with an overall grade of 15, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 16.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Qatar Senior School Certificate (Shahadat Al-Thanawaya Al-Aama) at an average of 60%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 2.5/75%, to include any essential subject(s) at 2.5/75%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diplomă de Bacalaureat with an overall grade of 7.5, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 8.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Attestat o Srednem Obrzovanii (Certificate of Secondary Education) at an average of 4, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.7, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Secondary Education Certificate (Tawjihiyah) with an average of 60%, and either the post-secondary diploma or first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.5/75%, to include any essential subject(s) at 75%.

Applicants will typically be required to pass Singapore GCE A-Levels with grades BCC, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Vysvedčenie o maturitnej skúške at grade 2.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.

English language: English at B2 level at grade 2 in the Vysvedčenie o maturitnej skúške is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Maturitetno spričevalo at grade 3.8, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 4.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the National Senior Certificate (with Matriculation Endorsement) with 4 subjects at 6555, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Bachiller with an average score of 7.2, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 7.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Sudan School Certificate with an average of 60%/C, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70%/B, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Avgangsbetyg/Slutbetyg fran Gymnasieskola with an average score of 16.5, to include any essential subject(s) at level 5 grade B.

English language: English Level 5 at grade B or English Level 6 at grade C in the Avgangsbetyg/Slutbetyg fran Gymnasieskola is accepted. For alternative English language qualifications, please see below.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificat de Maturité with an overall grade of 4.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass Maturitätszeugnis with an overall grade of 4.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Attestato Di Maturità with an overall grade of 4.6, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.6, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to complete the Certificate of Secondary Education/Maw 6 with an average of 75%/3.3, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 3; or complete the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average of 2.5, to include any essential subject(s) at 2.5.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the High School Diploma at an average of 55%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.2 (on the 5 point scale) or 60 (on the 100 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Secondary Education at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 3.7, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Certificate of Complete General Secondary Education, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 70% / 2.6 (on the 4 point scale) / 4.2 (on the 5 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the General Secondary Education Certificate Examination at 65%, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 2.3, to include any essential subject(s) at grade 2.3.

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Diploma of Academic Lyceum at an average of 3, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 65%, to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Título de Técnico Superior Universitario, and the first year of a university degree in a relevant subject with an average grade of 55% / 6.3 (on the 10 point scale) / 13 (on the 20 point scale), to include any essential subject(s).

Applicants will typically be required to pass the Zimbabwe General Certificate of Education at Advanced Level with grades BCC, to include any essential subject(s).


English Language Requirements

All courses at Abertay University are taught in English. If your first language is not English, you will need to demonstrate that you meet our English language requirements. Accepted English language qualifications include:

IELTS - overall score of 6.0 with no band lower than 5.5

TOEFL - overall score of 78 (individual elements: L-17, R-18, S-20, W-17)

Cambridge FCE/CAE/CPE - overall score of 169 on Cambridge Grading Scale

International Baccalaureate - English B at S5 or H4, English A no specific grade required

European Baccalaureate - English Language 1 at grade 6 or English Language 2 at grade 7

You do not need to prove your knowledge of English language if you are a national of certain countries. Please see English Language Requirements for the full list of accepted qualifications and further details.

 

If your academic qualifications aren't listed above, or if you have any further questions, please contact our international team using the form below. There is also lots of useful information for international applicants on how to apply, visa information, and studying in Scotland on our international pages.


Contact our International Team

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Support for Ukrainian students

We're keen to offer help to Ukrainian students who may wish to transfer from their existing institution in Ukraine or to register with us as new students for intake in September. There will be no tuition fees charged for the duration of the degree programme, as those with refugee status are treated as ‘Home/Scottish’ students and will also have access to the Student Awards Agency for Scotland bursary and student loans. Our Recruitment Team can help guide applicants.

SEND AN ENQUIRY

Not sure if you're eligible for entry?

If you have the potential and motivation to study at university, regardless of your background or personal circumstances, we welcome your application.

We understand some people have faced extra challenges before applying to university, which is why we consider the background in which your academic grades have been achieved when making an offer.

If you expect to receive passes in three Scottish Highers (grades A-C) and have either ...

  • been in care
  • participated in a targeted aspiration-raising programme such as LIFT OFF, LEAPS, FOCUS West, or Aspire North
  • no family background of going to university
  • attended a school or lived in an area where not many people go to university

... we encourage you to submit an application.

Fees and funding

The course fees you'll pay and the funding available to you depends on factors such as your nationality, location, personal circumstances and the course you are studying. 

More information

Find out about grants, bursaries, tuition fee loans, maintenance loans and living costs in our undergraduate fees and funding section.

 

Scholarships

We offer a range of scholarships to help support your studies with us.

As well as Abertay scholarships for English, Welsh, Northern Irish and international students, there are a range of corporate and philanthropic scholarships available. Some are course specific, many are not. There are some listed below or you can visit the Undergraduate scholarship pages.

View all

Abertay RUK Scholarship: Science and Social Science

A scholarship for prospective undergraduate Science and Social Science students applying from England, Wales or Northern Ireland.

Abertay International Scholarship

This is an award of up to £12,000 for prospective international undergraduate students.

Gain in-demand skills

Our criminology degrees equip you with the skills needed for a successful and varied career, especially if you want to work with or manage groups of people.

Some graduates go onto further study, often in the police, social policy/social work, criminology, law or criminal justice system. Scotland needs people trained in these areas, so it’s good news for your future.

Whatever you choose, we help you to become a confident, knowledgeable graduate with a great set of transferable skills, ready to start your career.

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Industry links & networking

We actively incorporate external speakers into the curriculum. These come from the media, business, the criminal justice system, the voluntary sector and local community groups.

There is a real-world work placement option in third year, giving you work experience and networking opportunities.

Some graduates have gone on to get a job in the organisation where they did their placement or through contacts they have made there. 

Group of males wearing suits sitting at desks

Get inspired

Meet some of our Criminology graduates and find out what they've gone on to do.

A picture of Stephen Annis at Abertay University

Stephen Annis

Stephen is a Trainee Solicitor at Blackadders.

Find out more

Graduate standing in front of bookshelf holding a book

Beata Kozłowska

Beata is a Legal Executive at Maguire McClafferty Solicitors in Dublin.

Find out more

Exterior of Abertay Universities Bernard King Library

Laura Scofield

Laura provides in-depth family support to both children and young people in families who have a loved one imprisoned.

Find out more

Unistats

Unistats collates comparable information in areas students have identified as important in making decisions about what and where to study. The core information it contains is called the Unistats dataset (formerly the Key Information Set (KIS)).

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