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Accessibility help

Help with access / Setting up your browser / Accessibility

Help with access

Can I use screen magnification software?

Although some of the built-in features of the web browser that you use might be helpful, they do not offer the same level of access as the magnification software packages developed by specialist software suppliers. The Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) website provides in-depth information for partially sighted web users.

I have very restricted vision. What are my options?

If you have little or no vision, the internet can be accessed using a speaking browser and refreshable Braille displays. A speaking browser reads aloud the contents of the entire website. Braille displays translate the site's content into Braille, which can be read by touch. Visit the RNIB website for details of technology designed to help if you have a visual disability.

I have physical disabilities. What can help me to access the site?

The AbilityNet website provides information that can help people with disabilities make better use of computers. AbilityNet is a British charity.

Alternative formats for reading site information

Alternative formats of all guides and publications on this site are available on request from:

IT Helpdesk
Information Services
University of Abertay Dundee
Bell Street
Dundee
DD1 1HG

Tel: 01382 308 888

Email: helpdesk@abertay.ac.uk

Setting up your browser

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All our suggestions to improve the accessibility of web pages will apply to every site you visit. Please note that they won't affect images on the screen. The following information will help you to change the font, change the text size, change the text and background colour and turn off page images on Microsoft Internet Explorer. Further help and support for other browsers is available from their help menus.

Microsoft Internet Explorer

To apply permanently the font and colour changes below:

Changing the font

Using a sans serif font (such as Arial), rather than a serif font (such as Times New Roman) can make text easier to read:

Displaying text larger or smaller

Changing text and background colour

Website authors and designers often specify particular fonts, typefaces and background colours for their pages, and the combinations can sometimes make the text difficult to read. You can override these settings by choosing your own preferred, clearer colour scheme - black text on a yellow background gives the most contrast:

To close images on web pages

To change the size of the window

There are more options to make websites easier to read, such as removing animation and expanding text. To look at the other options:

Accessibility

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The University of Abertay Dundee website has been designed with accessibility in mind, and should therefore be as accessible to as many modern browsing devices as possible, including screen readers and mobile browsers. We check all new content added, and as and when feedback is received we will make accessibility enhancements should they be required.